Wastewater Land Treatment System: Research, Designs, and Operation

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2024) | Viewed by 2112

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biosystems and Agriculture Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Interests: food processing wastewater irrigation; modeling of water and solute transport in soil; water management for agricultural irrigation using sensor technologies; phosphorus removal from wastewater using a nano-engineered media
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Guest Editor
Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439, USA
Interests: waste to resources; waste nutrient management; phosphorus recovery and reuse; municipal and industrial wastewater treatment; decentralized wastewater management; anaerobic digestion; renewable energy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wastewater land application can be advantageous due to its low cost, energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and maintenance requirements. Land application has been used for treating various wastewater types such as domestic, food processing, milking facility, farm residuals, etc. More than 60 million people in the United States depend on individual onsite or small community cluster systems to treat their wastewater. The use of onsite wastewater treatment systems is expected to increase to an estimated one-third of all new housing development and can cost 30–50% less to operate than a typical conventional wastewater treatment system.

Moreover, water scarcity is a global issue and agriculture is the primary source of freshwater depletion in the United States. Food processing wastewater is often irrigated on crop land to grow corn and alfalfa for animal feed, reducing the use of freshwater and nutrients. In addition, the proper land application of wastewater can promote groundwater recharge, ultimately sustaining groundwater resources.

The topics covered in this Special Issue will include, but are not limited to, the following.

  • Innovative research, design, and operation of wastewater land application.
  • Impact of climate change on the performance of land application treatment systems.
  • Groundwater recharge potential from land-applied wastewater land application.
  • Potential greenhouse gas emission reduction associated with the energy usage in wastewater land application, compared to conventional wastewater treatment systems

Dr. Younsuk Dong
Dr. Steven Safferman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wastewater land application
  • onsite wastewater treatment system
  • decentralized wastewater treatment system
  • wastewater irrigation
  • agricultural wastewater
  • food processing wastewater

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

23 pages, 274 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Low-Volume Meat Processing Wastewater and Impact of Facility Factors
by Gregory Rouland, Steven I. Safferman, Jeannine P. Schweihofer and Andrea J. Garmyn
Water 2024, 16(4), 540; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16040540 - 9 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1804
Abstract
Low-volume meat processing facilities often rely on decentralized wastewater treatment due to cost constraints and the lack of access to centralized treatment. Improved characterization of these facilities’ wastewater is crucial for meeting local groundwater discharge permits. This study also directly correlates treatment systems [...] Read more.
Low-volume meat processing facilities often rely on decentralized wastewater treatment due to cost constraints and the lack of access to centralized treatment. Improved characterization of these facilities’ wastewater is crucial for meeting local groundwater discharge permits. This study also directly correlates treatment systems and facility characteristics to the results of the characterization. The total nitrogen (TN), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and phosphorus (P) reductions ranged from −15% to 83%, 43% to 95%, and −75% to 62%, respectively. Slaughtering and smoking were found to significantly increase nutrient concentrations. The average TN leaving the slaughterhouses and processing-only facilities was 519 mg/L-N and 154 mg/L-N, respectively. The average BOD produced by the slaughterhouses and processors was 3002 mg/L and 1660 mg/L, respectively. Filtration was found to reduce BOD, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and trace metals. Aeration in a treatment lagoon was found to significantly reduce BOD, COD, and N compounds. The results indicate that even simple decentralized wastewater treatment systems, combined with facility management practices, can substantially reduce permitted wastewater characteristics. The facility with the best BOD removal had an effluent value of 71.3 mg/L, representing a 96% reduction. The facility with the best TN removal had an effluent value of 20 mg/L, representing a 92% reduction prior to discharge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wastewater Land Treatment System: Research, Designs, and Operation)
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