Coastal Processes and Climate Change

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Water".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2023) | Viewed by 16849

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta, Egypt
2. Geography Department, College of Arts and Social Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman
Interests: remote sensing; earth science; climate change; coastal dynamics; geomorphology

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Guest Editor
Petroleum and Mining Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Tishk International University, Erbil 44001, Iraq
Interests: remote sensing of land & vegetation; landcover/land use; drought; land degradation; change detection; land surface temperature
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coastal environments represent a complex dynamic interface that reflects the natural and human interactions. Scientists are encouraged to publish original research related to the characterization of the different aspects of coastal processes and dynamics. The recent pressures upon the coastal zone have escalated worries regarding the shoreline geomorphology and stability as well as sediment transport and deposition. Rising sea levels also impose a worldwide concern, particularly for low-lying coastal zones.

The vision of this Special issue is to provide the literature with up-to-date information on coastal dynamics, resilience, and adaptation measures toward the recent spiraling concerns of rising sea levels and human interference. It provides a leading interdisciplinary platform for researchers and specialists to present their overviews, visions, innovations, trends, and solutions adopted toward coastal processes and dynamics. This Special Issue also aims to present the latest conclusions regarding the analysis, monitoring and modelling of coastal processes.

  • Study of environmental parameters regarding coastal erosion, accretion, inundation, and stability.
  • Provide new innovations regarding data collections, analytical methods, and modelling techniques of coastal processes.
  • Environmental impact assessment of coastal engineering structure in terms of coastal stability and sediment transport.
  • Study of coastal pollution problems with focusing on pollutant transport by waves and littoral currents.
  • Remote sensing using different platforms (passive and active) of shoreline dynamics and deterioration of coastal ecosystems.
  • Geospatial analysis of coastal vulnerability to inundation and subsidence, particularly at low-lying coastal landscapes.

Prof. Dr. Mohamed Hereher
Prof. Dr. Ayad M. Fadhil Al-Quraishi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coastal erosion
  • fluvial systems
  • remote sensing
  • engineering structures
  • sea level rise
  • protection measures
  • coastal ecosystems
  • coastal vulnerability

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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34 pages, 17943 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Impact of Anthropogenic Evolution and Natural Processes on Shoreline Dynamics Using Multi-Temporal Satellite Images and Statistical Analysis
by Perumal Balakrishnan, Ammar Abulibdeh and Tahsin Abul Kasem Kabir
Water 2023, 15(8), 1440; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15081440 - 7 Apr 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2495
Abstract
This research aims to examine changes in the eastern part of Qatar’s shoreline from 1982 to 2018 by means of satellite imagery. Five different time periods, namely 1982, 1992, 2002, 2013, and 2018, were analysed to determine shoreline movements and shoreline variations. Techniques [...] Read more.
This research aims to examine changes in the eastern part of Qatar’s shoreline from 1982 to 2018 by means of satellite imagery. Five different time periods, namely 1982, 1992, 2002, 2013, and 2018, were analysed to determine shoreline movements and shoreline variations. Techniques such as maximum likelihood classification, the normalised difference vegetation index, and tasselled cap transformation were utilised to extract the shoreline data. Linear regression rate statistics were used to quantify the rate of shoreline variations. The results indicate that the majority of shoreline accretion is a result of human activities such as coastal construction, land reclamation, and building artificial islands, which are associated with the high economic activity over the past two decades. Significant changes were observed in Lusail City, The Pearl, and Hamad International Airport (HIA). Natural sediment accumulation was also observed in Al Wakra and on the southern side of HIA. In general, there were more land gains than losses throughout the study period, and the shoreline increased by twice its previous length. The field survey confirmed the presence of sandy and rocky beaches, as well as a shoreline with protective structures such as natural limestone rocks and concrete reinforcement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Processes and Climate Change)
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11 pages, 2070 KiB  
Article
Contamination and Risk Assessment of Potentially Toxic Elements in Coastal Sediments of the Area between Al-Jubail and Al-Khafji, Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia
by Hassan Alzahrani, Abdelbaset S. El-Sorogy, Saleh Qaysi and Fahad Alshehri
Water 2023, 15(3), 573; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15030573 - 1 Feb 2023
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2278
Abstract
Coastal environments need continuous environmental risk assessment, especially with increasing coastal development and human activities. The present work evaluates the distribution, contamination, and environmental risk of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in coastal sediments between Al-Jubail and Al-Khafji cities along the Arabian Gulf, Saudi [...] Read more.
Coastal environments need continuous environmental risk assessment, especially with increasing coastal development and human activities. The present work evaluates the distribution, contamination, and environmental risk of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in coastal sediments between Al-Jubail and Al-Khafji cities along the Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia, and documents the influence of background references applied in pollution indices. Thirty-two sediment samples were collected for analysis of Ni, Cu, Cr, As, Zn, Pb and Hg using ICP-AES. The ranges of PTEs (mg/kg) were in the following order: Cr (3.00–20.0), Ni (2.00–32.0), Zn (2.00–14.0), As (2.00–4.00), Pb (1.50–5.00), Cu (1.00–5.00), and Hg (0.50–1.00). The coastal sediments show severe enrichment with As and Hg, and no to minor enrichment and a low contamination with Cr, Cu, Cr, Zn, and Pb. Based on sediment quality guidelines, concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, As, and Cr do not represent a concern for benthic communities, while Ni and Hg show a risk for benthic communities in four and 17 sampled areas, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated a geogenic source for Zn, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb, mixed natural and anthropogenic sources for As, and an anthropogenic source for Hg, mostly from oil pollution, sewage, and industrial effluents spreading near Al-Jubail industrial city. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Processes and Climate Change)
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13 pages, 5758 KiB  
Article
Towards Quantifying the Coastal Vulnerability due to Natural Hazards using the InVEST Coastal Vulnerability Model
by Amna Al Ruheili and Alaba Boluwade
Water 2023, 15(3), 380; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15030380 - 17 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2755
Abstract
Coastal areas and coastal communities are facing threats due to the impacts of climate change. Therefore, assessing their vulnerabilities and the potential for natural habitats to contribute to protecting coastal areas and communities is essential for effective long-term planning, sustainability, and resilient coastal [...] Read more.
Coastal areas and coastal communities are facing threats due to the impacts of climate change. Therefore, assessing their vulnerabilities and the potential for natural habitats to contribute to protecting coastal areas and communities is essential for effective long-term planning, sustainability, and resilient coastal management. This study modeled and mapped coastal vulnerability using the InVEST 3.9.1 model developed by the Natural Capital Project Coastal Vulnerability model to explore the role of natural habitats in mitigating coastal hazards in Southern Al Sharqiya and Al Wusta Governorates of the Sultanate of Oman. The results showed that the highest hazard classification > 2.67 represented 18% of the coastal distribution, the intermediate hazard classification ranging between 2.31 and 2.66 represented 38% of the coastal distribution, and the lowest hazard classification ranging between 1.22 and 2.30) represented 44% of the coastal distribution. These results, however, did not account for the role of natural habitats in coastal protection. In terms of the role of natural habitats in mitigating coastal hazards, the presence of natural habitats reduced the extent of the highest exposed shoreline by 14% and 8% for the highest and intermediate areas, respectively. Under the natural habitat’s scenario, the habitats could provide 59% protection for the coastal communities under the highest exposure category and 41% under the intermediate category. Under a no-habitat scenario, about 75% of the coastal communities are exposed and vulnerable to coastal hazards under the highest hazard exposure category and 25% under the intermediate category. These results demonstrate that it is critical, especially for policymakers, to enhance the protection of coastal ecosystems to achieve coastal resilience. This study buttresses the importance of coastal ecosystem assessments in ensuring coastal resilience and climate change adaptation processes for any coastal countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Processes and Climate Change)
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14 pages, 3140 KiB  
Article
Environmental Assessment of Surface Seawater in Al-Uqair Coastline, Eastern Saudi Arabia
by Mansour H. Al-Hashim, Abdelbaset S. El-Sorogy, Fahad Alshehri and Saleh Qaisi
Water 2022, 14(21), 3423; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14213423 - 27 Oct 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2131
Abstract
The contamination of seawater with anthropogenic factors is a global challenge because of its negative impacts on marine environments and coastal societies. Therefore, assessing water contamination is crucial. The present work uses pollution indices and multivariate statistical analyses to document high-level heavy metal [...] Read more.
The contamination of seawater with anthropogenic factors is a global challenge because of its negative impacts on marine environments and coastal societies. Therefore, assessing water contamination is crucial. The present work uses pollution indices and multivariate statistical analyses to document high-level heavy metal concentrations and identify potential polluters by analyzing 35 seawater samples collected from Al-Uqair coastline, Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia. The total content of heavy metals (HMs) (μg/L) ranged from 7109 to 7398 for Sr, 7.00–14.50 for Cr, 3.30–9.90 for Zn, 3.00–8.80 for Fe, 4.40–7.60 for As, 1.20–6.90 for Ni, 2.30–4.70 for V, 1.10–3.80 for Cu, 2.50–3.10 for Se, 0.31–1.43 for Al, 0.18–1.10 for Hg, 0.04–0.08 for Cd, 0.09–0.43 for Pb, and 0.02–0.10 for Sb. The recorded average concentrations of HMs were below the maximal admissible concentration of the World Health Organization (WHO). The heavy-metal pollution index (HPI) indicates that 14.29% of the water samples were below medium pollution, and 85.71% were below high pollution. All seawater samples were categorized under low contamination and good water on the basis of the degree of contamination (Cd) and water pollution index (PIj), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicates mixed anthropogenic and natural sources for the investigated metals, with increasing control of the anthropogenic factors for Cr, Zn, As, V, Ni, Se, Cu, Hg, Pb, Sb, and Cd; and the control of natural factors for Sr, Fe, and Al. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Processes and Climate Change)
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Review

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18 pages, 22139 KiB  
Review
Understanding Climate Change and Heavy Metals in Coastal Areas: A Macroanalysis Assessment
by Wen Jye Mok, Mazlan Abd Ghaffar, Mohd Iqbal Mohd Noor, Fathurrahman Lananan and Mohamad Nor Azra
Water 2023, 15(5), 891; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15050891 - 25 Feb 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 6340
Abstract
Increasing human-induced climate issues, such as water pollution, have triggered rapid physiochemical changes, especially in coastal regions. These changes have directly impacted aquatic animals that live near coastal areas, such as bivalves and crustaceans (e.g., clams, crabs), as well as those that live [...] Read more.
Increasing human-induced climate issues, such as water pollution, have triggered rapid physiochemical changes, especially in coastal regions. These changes have directly impacted aquatic animals that live near coastal areas, such as bivalves and crustaceans (e.g., clams, crabs), as well as those that live in the lower areas of the habitat (i.e., sediment). Heavy metal pollution (e.g., mercury) is one of the most concerning physiochemical changes in these areas. The effects of heavy metals on coastal environments and organisms can be substantial, in spite of restoration efforts. Thus, more studies are needed to analyze the current situation of the impacts of climate-change-related issues on heavy metal concentrations in coastal areas. In this paper, we provide a scientometrics analysis of the interactions between climate change and heavy metal concentrations in coastal regions around the world. Scientometrics is the quantitative analysis of the available literature, with a focus on research patterns, using continuous and systematic methods. Our results showed that there was a total of 7922 related studies from 1979 to 2021. Heavy metal contamination, ecological quality status and ocean acidification are among the most influential keywords in this field. We concluded that among climate change issues, heavy metals are becoming a popular topic within research associated with climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Processes and Climate Change)
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