Research in Application of Advanced Water Treatment Technology

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Wastewater Treatment and Reuse".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (3 March 2023) | Viewed by 4853

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), Baltimore, MD, USA
Interests: urban planning; green infrastructure; ecological engineering; water and wastewwater treatment; water distribution system; wastewater collection systems; waste management; operations research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to review current technologies and solutions with regard to advanced water treatment.

Uncontrolled discharge of contaminated water and wastewater, which is increasingly common from various industrial and municipal activities and other sources, has negatively affected the quality of water resources. The development of novel materials and techniques has contributed to significant technological improvements in this area as well as enhancing system efficiency and capacity. Stormwater treatment systems isolate pollutants of concern to both public and ecosystem health. Adequate stormwater management can solve many problems arising from water pollution.

This issue focuses on the treatment technologies improving wastewater treatment, such as physicochemical processes, biological and activated sludge processes, advanced oxidation processes and advanced wastewater treatment plant management. New technologies that can produce clean water and energy from water and wastewater treatment and recent scientific developments and technical solutions in these areas will be emphasized. We also welcome research on various methods for the removal, treatment and detection of emerging contaminants (ECs) in water and wastewater and the efficient management of wastewater treatment plants.

Dr. Cheinchi Chang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water treatment
  • contaminants removal
  • wastewater
  • water pollution
  • technology process
  • water management
  • pollution control

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 1235 KiB  
Article
Comparing Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Perborate Ultraviolet Advanced Oxidation Processes for 1,4-Dioxane Removal from Tertiary Wastewater Effluent
by Tulsi L. Shukla and Steven J. Duranceau
Water 2023, 15(7), 1364; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15071364 - 1 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2797
Abstract
Ultraviolet advanced oxidation processes (UV-AOPs) were compared using sodium perborate (UV/NaBO3 AOP) or hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2 AOP) for 1,4-dioxane removal from tertiary wastewater effluent. Both UV-AOPs were also tested with the addition of acetic acid. Results revealed that sodium [...] Read more.
Ultraviolet advanced oxidation processes (UV-AOPs) were compared using sodium perborate (UV/NaBO3 AOP) or hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2 AOP) for 1,4-dioxane removal from tertiary wastewater effluent. Both UV-AOPs were also tested with the addition of acetic acid. Results revealed that sodium perborate performed similarly to hydrogen peroxide. The UV/NaBO3 AOP with 6 milligrams per liter (mg/L) as H2O2 resulted in 43.9 percent 1,4-dioxane removal, while an equivalent UV/H2O2 AOP showed 42.8 percent removal. Despite their similar performance, NaBO3 is approximately 3.3 times more expensive than H2O2. However, the solid form of NaBO3 can provide a major benefit to remote and mobile operations. Unlike H2O2 solution, which degrades over time and requires repeated costly shipments, NaBO3 is a convenient source of H2O2, and a long-term supply can be shipped at once and mixed into solution as needed. The addition of acetic acid to a UV/H2O2 AOP was found to enhance 1,4-dioxane removal, increasing treatment effectiveness by 5.7%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research in Application of Advanced Water Treatment Technology)
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16 pages, 1964 KiB  
Article
Aspects of Polymeric-Based Membranes in the Water Treatment Field: An Interim Structural Analysis
by Muhammad Farzik Ijaz, Hamad F. Alharbi, Ahmed Zaki Alsaggaf and Abdulaziz K. Assaifan
Water 2023, 15(6), 1114; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15061114 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1565
Abstract
Solar-driven interfacial evaporation (SDIE) is considered a sustainable and environmentally friendly technology for using solar energy to produce fresh water, which is a crucial resource for the existence of human life. Porous membranes are widely used in SDIE owing to their porous structure, [...] Read more.
Solar-driven interfacial evaporation (SDIE) is considered a sustainable and environmentally friendly technology for using solar energy to produce fresh water, which is a crucial resource for the existence of human life. Porous membranes are widely used in SDIE owing to their porous structure, which is highly suitable for this kind of photothermal material and allows an efficient supply of water and escape of vapor during the evaporation process. Electrospinning is perhaps the most versatile technique to produce highly porous structures of nanofiber membranes with a large surface-to-volume ratio, high porosity, low density, and many advantages. Nevertheless, acquiring a stronger background on the initial research questions in this enticing field of research needs further investigation. Typically, for the enhancement of process control, the impact of flow rate on the morphology of the prepared membrane is quite important. This research article has two-fold objectives: firstly, it discusses the fundamental description of the photothermal conversion mechanism of polymer-based photothermal materials for water treatment. A systematic investigation supported by previous studies revealing the working mechanism and the design of solar-driven interfacial evaporation has been provided. On the other hand, our interim experimental results elaborate on the influence of process conditions such as electrospinning parameters on the structural morphology and diameter of fabricated electrospun nanofibers produced by using the coaxial electrospinning setup in our lab. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the morphology of the electrospun nanofibers. Our introductory results provide a useful insight into tuning the necessary process parameters to fabricate electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber membranes by electrospinning technique. From our preliminary results after the three processing experiments, it is revealed that a polymer concentration of 10% wt., an applied voltage of 20 kV, a tip-to-collector distance of 18 cm, and a flow rate of 0.8 mL/h produce the optimum nanofiber membranes with a uniform structure and a diameter in the range 304–394 nm. The variation in the diameter of nanofibers in the three processing conditions is endowed by the regulation of the initiating droplet extruded from the tip of the metallic needle (syringe jet) to the collector using the electrospinning setup. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research in Application of Advanced Water Treatment Technology)
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