The Impact of Climate Change on Watershed Hydrology: Precipitation, Flood, and Drought

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 2939

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Korea Environment Institute, Sejong 30147, Republic of Korea
Interests: watershed hydrology; regional frequency analysis; flood risk management; hydrologic modeling; integrated water resource management; geomorphology; climate-land-water interaction; ecohydrology; machine learning
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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea
Interests: urban hydrology; urban green infrastructure; urban water availability; urban stormwater management; water quality modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon-si 16227, Republic of Korea
Interests: hydrology; environmental engineering; hydrological modeling; spatial–temporal analysis; hydro-meteorology; risk analysis; climate change impacts; statistical analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is with great pleasure that we ask you to share your novel research results in the field of watershed hydrology related to flood/drought risk analysis, social–ecological systems, hydrology, hydraulics, integrated water resource management, environment, and climate change adaptation in a broad sense to the Special Issue “Hydrology” of Water. Integrated water management in watershed hydrology plays a significant role in building nature-based cities and societies when considering water availability, hydroclimate variability, water pollution, and ecological impairment. Furthermore, strategic natural resource management with sustainable utilization can assist in providing solutions for global water and environmental issues. Moving toward integrated water governance is highly crucial to solve global issues related to water resources and water-related disaster management, including complexity and variability under climate change. This Special Issue of Water aims to showcase the state of the art in the adaptation and use of observed data for risk analysis, extreme hydrometeorological events, integrated water resource management, social–ecological systems, aquatic ecosystems, and natural environments. 

Given the importance and relevance of this Special Issue, we invite researchers to contribute original research articles as well as review articles. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Impact of climate change on hydrology;
  • Integrated water governance;
  • Water-related disaster risk analysis;
  • Water resources management;
  • Sustainable social–ecological systems;
  • Hydrological/environmental modelling;
  • Water quality monitoring;
  • Hydrologic and hydraulic analyses;
  • River ecosystem resilience;
  • Geomorphological processes and characteristics;
  • Water policy;
  • Environmental assessment;
  • Machine learning technology.

Dr. Kichul Jung
Dr. Daeryong Park
Dr. Myoung-Jin Um
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • integrated water management
  • water-related disaster risk analysis
  • impact of climate change on hydrology
  • hydrologic/hydraulic/water quality/ecological modelling
  • stream resilience and aquatic ecosystem enhancement
  • data analysis/statistical analysis/machine learning
  • climate change adaptation
  • sustainable development strategies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3078 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Suitability of the Flood Defense Policy of Republic of Korea for Risk Reduction in Local Rivers
by Kichul Jung, Heejin An, Sewon Hwang, Seung Beom Seo, Hyemin Park, Chan Park and Jonghyun Yoo
Water 2023, 15(22), 3908; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15223908 - 9 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1139
Abstract
This study examines whether the fluvial flood defense system of Korea is appropriate for risk reduction. Using spatial socioeconomic data and remote sensing, we estimated the potential economic damage that can be caused by the flooding of local streams and rivers along the [...] Read more.
This study examines whether the fluvial flood defense system of Korea is appropriate for risk reduction. Using spatial socioeconomic data and remote sensing, we estimated the potential economic damage that can be caused by the flooding of local streams and rivers along the Nakdong River (the longest river in Korea). For the analysis, a river risk map including return periods (50, 80, 100, and 200 years) and spatial inventories (residential, agricultural, industrial assets, and human lives) was employed to determine flood-prone areas and assess the damage within the inundation areas. A quantitative flood analysis was conducted using an object-based method to estimate the expected annual damage. We then compared the estimated damage for each tributary within the designed return periods and found no correlation. Numerous tributaries with low-defense targets were considered high-risk, while those with high-defense targets were assessed as low-risk. The dataset used in this study covered four damage categories. Among them, flood damage to residential assets appeared to have the highest value, whereas flood damage to industrial assets had the lowest value. The results demonstrate that the Korean government needs to tailor its flood defense policy based on quantitative risk assessments to effectively manage flood risks, especially given the increasing risk of climate change. Full article
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19 pages, 15207 KiB  
Article
Parameter Optimization of Coupled 1D–2D Hydrodynamic Model for Urban Flood Inundation
by Chang-Young Ha, Beom-Jin Kim, Jae-Nam Lee and Byung-Hyun Kim
Water 2023, 15(16), 2946; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15162946 - 15 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1299
Abstract
In this study, the sensitivity of the parameters was analyzed using PEST (Parameter ESTimation) to improve the accuracy of the runoff and flooding analysis in urban areas. Using four parameters (watershed width, roughness coefficient of impervious and pervious areas, and Manning’s roughness coefficient [...] Read more.
In this study, the sensitivity of the parameters was analyzed using PEST (Parameter ESTimation) to improve the accuracy of the runoff and flooding analysis in urban areas. Using four parameters (watershed width, roughness coefficient of impervious and pervious areas, and Manning’s roughness coefficient for conduits) with high sensitivity, six scenarios were created according to the number of parameters considered, and a PEST-SWMM (Storm Water Management Model) combined simulation was performed. The scenarios were applied to the Seocho 3, 4, 5, Yeoksam, and Nonhyun drainage basins in which inundation damage occurred due to the heavy rain on 21 July 2013. The sensitivity of the four parameters was in the order of Manning’s roughness coefficient for conduits, the roughness coefficient of the impervious area, the watershed width, and the roughness coefficient of the pervious area. When the PEST–SWMM coupled analysis for each scenario was performed using the analyzed sensitivity results, the RMSE (Root Mean Square Error) decreased by up to 2.37 cm and the RPE (Relative Peak Error) decreased by 22.04% compared to the SWMM alone. When the accuracy of each scenario was analyzed, similar or better accuracy was obtained as far as the parameters were considered. However, the further consideration of less sensitive parameters tends to reduce the accuracy. In this study, it was found that a more efficient simulation in terms of accuracy and calculation time could be obtained when constructing scenarios by considering only highly sensitive parameters. Additionally, when combining two-dimensional (2D) flood analysis with other rainfall events, it can help study real-time flood forecasting in urban areas. Full article
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