Special Issue "The 10th Anniversary of Vaccines—Vaccines against Emerging and Tropical Infectious Diseases"

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Vaccines against (re)emerging and Tropical Infections Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 600

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nirbhay Kumar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
Interests: parasitic diseases; tropical medicine; malaria immunology and vaccinology; malaria–helminth immunobiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2022, we will celebrate the 10th anniversary volume of the journal Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X), and we would be thrilled if you could join us on this wonderful occasion.

Vaccines is an international, peer-reviewed, quick-refereeing, open access journal published online by MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Vaccines is indexed by SCIE, PubMed (NLM), as well as others. The Impact Factor for this journal is 4.961, and it ranks 77/161 (Q2) in “Immunology” and 59/139 (Q2) in “Medicine, Research & Experimental Pharmacology” in Web of Science. The inaugural issue was released in 2013, and in 2020, we published the 1000th paper in this journal. In 2021, we achieved our goal of publishing 1200 papers in one year. Vaccines is definitely a rapidly developing journal.

In recognition of this significant milestone, we are launching a Special Issue entitled “The 10th Anniversary of Vaccines—Vaccines against Emerging and Tropical Infectious Diseases”. This Special Issue will include high-quality papers on topics within the broad scope of Vaccines. We will consider manuscripts that investigate immunology and vaccinology against emerging and tropical infectious diseases,  immunological responses to vaccine targets, novel approaches for vaccine development, novel vaccine delivery platforms, novel immunomodulatory adjuvants, role of innate immunity, immune correlates of vaccine efficacy, and evaluation of vaccines using animal models and humans. It is our pleasure to invite you to contribute an original research paper or a comprehensive review article for peer review and possible publication in Vaccines.

Prof. Dr. Nirbhay Kumar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Effective Functional Immunogenicity of a DNA Vaccine Combination Delivered via In Vivo Electroporation Targeting Malaria Infection and Transmission
Vaccines 2022, 10(7), 1134; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10071134 - 16 Jul 2022
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Abstract
Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) and Pfs25 are leading candidates for the development of pre-erythrocytic and transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV), respectively. Although considerable progress has been made in developing PfCSP- and Pfs25-based vaccines, neither have elicited complete protection or transmission blocking in clinical trials. [...] Read more.
Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) and Pfs25 are leading candidates for the development of pre-erythrocytic and transmission-blocking vaccines (TBV), respectively. Although considerable progress has been made in developing PfCSP- and Pfs25-based vaccines, neither have elicited complete protection or transmission blocking in clinical trials. The combination of antigens targeting various life stages is an alternative strategy to develop a more efficacious malaria vaccine. In this study, female and male mice were immunized with DNA plasmids encoding PfCSP and Pfs25, administered alone or in combination via intramuscular in vivo electroporation (EP). Antigen-specific antibodies were analyzed for antibody titers, avidity and isotype by ELISA. Immune protection against sporozoite challenge, using transgenic P. berghei expressing PfCSP and a GFP-luciferase fusion protein (PbPfCSP-GFP/Luc), was assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging and blood-stage parasite growth. Transmission reducing activity (TRA) was evaluated in standard membrane feeding assays (SMFA). High levels of PfCSP- and Pfs25-specific antibodies were induced in mice immunized with either DNA vaccine alone or in combination. No difference in antibody titer and avidity was observed for both PfCSP and Pfs25 between the single DNA and combined DNA immunization groups. When challenged by PbPfCSP-GFP/Luc sporozoites, mice immunized with PfCSP alone or combined with Pfs25 revealed significantly reduced liver-stage parasite loads as compared to mice immunized with Pfs25, used as a control. Furthermore, parasite liver loads were negatively correlated with PfCSP-specific antibody levels. When evaluating TRA, we found that immunization with Pfs25 alone or in combination with PfCSP elicited comparable significant transmission reduction. Our studies reveal that the combination of PfCSP and Pfs25 DNAs into a vaccine delivered by in vivo EP in mice does not compromise immunogenicity, infection protection and transmission reduction when compared to each DNA vaccine individually, and provide support for further evaluation of this DNA combination vaccine approach in larger animals and clinical trials. Full article
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