Special Issue "Tumor Diagnosis and Treatment: Imaging Assessment"

A special issue of Tomography (ISSN 2379-139X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2022 | Viewed by 1031

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Filippo Crimi’
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Radiology, Department of Medicine-DIMED, University of Padova, 35100 Padova, Italy
Interests: CT; MRI; US; PET/CT; PET/MRI

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Imaging is becoming increasingly important in the field of oncology and, nowadays, it is a pivotal tool for clinical decision-making. Imaging is used for cancer screening, diagnosis, staging, restaging, and monitoring for cancer recurrence. For diagnosis and screening, scientific societies are promoting standardized systems of reporting in order to reduce the variability of the reports and to improve the detection of small tumors. These criteria are in a continuous state evolution and improvement since imaging techniques are being continually developed, and it is necessary to improve the accuracy of the reporting systems as much as possible.

In staging and restaging, multiple criteria have been proposed to evaluate the response of the tumors and metastases to neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapies (chemo or radiotherapies), starting from the well-known RECIST criteria up to the volumetric analyses and the evaluation of the image texture. With specific software for texture analysis, it is possible to extract different features from US, CT, and MRI images that are mainly not appreciable by the eye of the radiologist, thus allowing a quantitative evaluation of the tumoral masses that was not possible a few years ago. This technique is illuminating new pathways in the field of diagnostics, and the help of artificial intelligence in evaluating such a large amount of data could become an ordinary application in a few years.

Dr. Filippo Crimi’
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • CT
  • MRI
  • US
  • PET/CT
  • PET/MRI
  • diagnosis
  • staging
  • texture analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Predictors of Metastatic Lymph Nodes at Preoperative Staging CT in Gastric Adenocarcinoma
Tomography 2022, 8(3), 1196-1207; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8030098 - 22 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Background. The aim of this study was to identify the most accurate computed-tomography (CT) dimensional criteria of loco-regional lymph nodes (LNs) for detecting nodal metastases in gastric cancer (GC) patients. Methods. Staging CTs of surgically resected GC were jointly reviewed by two radiologists, [...] Read more.
Background. The aim of this study was to identify the most accurate computed-tomography (CT) dimensional criteria of loco-regional lymph nodes (LNs) for detecting nodal metastases in gastric cancer (GC) patients. Methods. Staging CTs of surgically resected GC were jointly reviewed by two radiologists, considering only loco-regional LNs with a long axis (LA) ≥ 5 mm. For each nodal group, the short axis (SA), volume and SA/LA ratio of the largest LN, the sum of the SAs of all LNs, and the mean of the SA/LA ratios were plotted in ROC curves, taking the presence/absence of metastases at histopathology for reference. On a per-patient basis, the sums of the SAs of all LNs, and the sums of the SAs, volumes, and SA/LA ratios of the largest LNs in all nodal groups were also plotted, taking the presence/absence of metastatic LNs in each patient for reference. Results. Four hundred and forty-three nodal groups were harvested during surgery from 107 patients with GC, and 173 (39.1%) were metastatic at histopathology. By nodal group, the sum of the SAs showed the best Area Under the Curve (AUC), with a sensitivity/specificity of 62.4/72.6% using Youden’s index with a >8 mm cutoff. In the per-patient analysis, the sum of the SAs of all LNs in the loco-regional nodal groups showed the best AUC with a sensitivity/specificity of 65.6%/83.7%, using Youden’s index with a >39 mm cutoff. Conclusion. In patients with GC, the sum of the SAs of all the LNs at staging CT is the best predictor among dimensional LNs criteria of both metastatic invasion of the nodal group and the presence of metastatic LNs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tumor Diagnosis and Treatment: Imaging Assessment)
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Case Report
18F-FES PET/CT Improves the Detection of Intraorbital Metastases in Estrogen-Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: Two Representative Cases and Review of the Literature
Tomography 2022, 8(2), 1060-1065; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8020086 - 07 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Orbital metastases are a rare but life-altering complication in cancer. Most commonly seen in breast cancer, metastases to the optic nerves or extraocular muscles can have a devastating impact on visual acuity and quality of life. Hormone receptor status plays a central role [...] Read more.
Orbital metastases are a rare but life-altering complication in cancer. Most commonly seen in breast cancer, metastases to the optic nerves or extraocular muscles can have a devastating impact on visual acuity and quality of life. Hormone receptor status plays a central role in metastatic breast cancer treatment, with endocrine therapy often representing first-line therapy in hormone-receptor-positive cancers. Staging and treatment response evaluation with positron emission tomography (PET) computed tomography (CT) imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is limited by high physiologic uptake in the intracranial and intraorbital compartments. Thus, traditional staging scans with 18F-FDG PET/CT may under-detect intraorbital and intracranial metastatic disease and inaccurately evaluate active metastatic disease burden. In comparison, 18F-fluoroestradiol (18F-FES) is a novel estrogen-receptor-specific PET radiotracer, which more accurately assesses the intracranial and intraorbital compartments in patients with estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) cancers than 18F-FDG, due to lack of physiologic background activity in these regions. We present two cases of breast cancer patients with orbital metastases confirmed on MR imaging who underwent PET/CT imaging with 18F-FES and 18F-FDG. Multimodality imaging with 18F-FES PET/CT offers higher detection sensitivity of orbital metastases, compared with traditional 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging, and can improve the assessment of treatment response in patients with estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tumor Diagnosis and Treatment: Imaging Assessment)
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