Special Issue "Advances in Computer Graphics, Geometric Modeling, and Virtual and Augmented Reality"

A special issue of Symmetry (ISSN 2073-8994). This special issue belongs to the section "Computer and Engineering Science and Symmetry/Asymmetry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Andres Iglesias Prieto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Applied Mathematics and Computational Sciences, University of Cantabria, C.P. 39005 Santander, Spain
2. Department of Information Science, Faculty of Sciences, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, 274-8510 Funabashi, Japan
Interests: swarm intelligence and swarm robotics; bio-inspired optimisation; computer graphics; geometric modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Mikio Shinya
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Information Science, Faculty of Sciences, Narashino Campus, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi 274-8510, Japan
Interests: computer graphics; rendering; natural phenomena; material perception; multiple scattering
Prof. Dr. Akemi Galvez Tomida
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Applied Mathematics and Computational Sciences, University of Cantabria, C.P. 39005 Santander, Spain
2. Department of Information Science, Faculty of Sciences, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, 274-8510 Funabashi, Japan
Interests: computer graphics; geometric modelling and processing; artificial intelligence; soft computing for optimisation; evolutionary computation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Norimasa Yoshida
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, 1-2-1 Izumi-cho Narashino, Chiba 275-8575 Japan
Interests: computer-aided geometric design; computer graphics; aesthetic curves and surfaces; log-aesthetic curves; logarithmic curvature/torsion graphs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Computer graphics is unanimously recognized as a major field in computer science and a driving force of our current technological world. Nowadays, computer graphics can be found everywhere: From breathtaking special effects and computer animation for theatrical movies and TV films to thrilling digital worlds and believable synthetic actors in blockbuster video games; from scientific visualization to engineering applications; from noninvasive medical imaging techniques for diagnosis and therapy to advertising, education, architecture, surveying, archaeology, and many others. The field of computer graphics is constantly evolving as a result of the latest advances in hardware and software, such as powerful multi-core graphical cards (GPUs) or exciting, recently-released devices for virtual and augmented reality. Similarly, geometric modeling (the collection of algorithms, methods and techniques to describe the shape and geometric features of an object) is a fundamental tool in many applied and industrial fields, such as computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) for the automotive, aerospace, and ship building industries, robotics, biomedical engineering (medical implants and prosthesis), and so on.

This Special Issue aims to foster the dissemination of high-quality research in methods, theories, techniques, tools and devices concerning computer graphics, geometric modeling, and virtual and augmented reality. Original research articles are solicited on all aspects of those fields, including novel potential or real applications for solving challenging problems and opening new promising lines of research.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Geometric Modeling
  •      CAD/CAM
  •      Solid Modeling
  •      Physically Based Modeling
  •      Computer-Aided Geometric Design (CAGD)
  •      Curve and Surface Reconstruction
  •      Geometric Processing
  •      Scientific Visualization
  •      Autonomous Agents
  •      Computer Animation
  •      Video Games
  •      Rendering
  •      Multimedia
  •      Virtual Reality
  •      Augmented Reality
  •      Virtual Worlds
  •      Texture Models
  •      Human-Computer Interaction
  •      Computer Graphics and Internet
  •      Artificial Intelligence for Computer Graphics and Geometric Modeling
  •      Computer Graphics Software and Hardware
  •      Computer Graphics Applications (Art, Education, Engineering, Entertainment, Medicine, etc.)
  •      Current and Future Trends in Computer Graphics

Prof. Andres Iglesias Prieto
Prof. Mikio Shinya
Prof. Norimasa Yoshida
Prof. Akemi Galvez Tomida
Guest Editos

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Symmetry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Computer Graphics
  • Geometric Modeling and Processing
  • Virtual and Augmented Reality
  • Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM)
  • Curve and Surface Reconstruction
  • Computer Animation and Video Games
  • Rendering and Texturing

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Article
Integrated Hybrid Second Order Algorithm for Orthogonal Projection onto a Planar Implicit Curve
Symmetry 2018, 10(5), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym10050164 - 15 May 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1425
Abstract
The computation of the minimum distance between a point and a planar implicit curve is a very important problem in geometric modeling and graphics. An integrated hybrid second order algorithm to facilitate the computation is presented. The proofs indicate that the convergence of [...] Read more.
The computation of the minimum distance between a point and a planar implicit curve is a very important problem in geometric modeling and graphics. An integrated hybrid second order algorithm to facilitate the computation is presented. The proofs indicate that the convergence of the algorithm is independent of the initial value and demonstrate that its convergence order is up to two. Some numerical examples further confirm that the algorithm is more robust and efficient than the existing methods. Full article
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Article
Automatic Generation of Dynamic Skin Deformation for Animated Characters
Symmetry 2018, 10(4), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym10040089 - 31 Mar 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2725
Abstract
Since non-automatic rigging requires heavy human involvements, and various automatic rigging algorithms are less efficient in terms of computational efficiency, especially for current curve-based skin deformation methods, identifying the iso-parametric curves and creating the animation skeleton requires tedious and time-consuming manual work. Although [...] Read more.
Since non-automatic rigging requires heavy human involvements, and various automatic rigging algorithms are less efficient in terms of computational efficiency, especially for current curve-based skin deformation methods, identifying the iso-parametric curves and creating the animation skeleton requires tedious and time-consuming manual work. Although several automatic rigging methods have been developed, but they do not aim at curve-based models. To tackle this issue, this paper proposes a new rigging algorithm for automatic generation of dynamic skin deformation to quickly identify iso-parametric curves and create an animation skeleton in a few milliseconds, which can be seamlessly used in curve-based skin deformation methods to make the rigging process fast enough for highly efficient computer animation applications. Full article
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Article
Cuckoo Search Algorithm with Lévy Flights for Global-Support Parametric Surface Approximation in Reverse Engineering
Symmetry 2018, 10(3), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym10030058 - 03 Mar 2018
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2205
Abstract
This paper concerns several important topics of the Symmetry journal, namely, computer-aided design, computational geometry, computer graphics, visualization, and pattern recognition. We also take advantage of the symmetric structure of the tensor-product surfaces, where the parametric variables u and v play a symmetric [...] Read more.
This paper concerns several important topics of the Symmetry journal, namely, computer-aided design, computational geometry, computer graphics, visualization, and pattern recognition. We also take advantage of the symmetric structure of the tensor-product surfaces, where the parametric variables u and v play a symmetric role in shape reconstruction. In this paper we address the general problem of global-support parametric surface approximation from clouds of data points for reverse engineering applications. Given a set of measured data points, the approximation is formulated as a nonlinear continuous least-squares optimization problem. Then, a recent metaheuristics called Cuckoo Search Algorithm (CSA) is applied to compute all relevant free variables of this minimization problem (namely, the data parameters and the surface poles). The method includes the iterative generation of new solutions by using the Lévy flights to promote the diversity of solutions and prevent stagnation. A critical advantage of this method is its simplicity: the CSA requires only two parameters, many fewer than any other metaheuristic approach, so the parameter tuning becomes a very easy task. The method is also simple to understand and easy to implement. Our approach has been applied to a benchmark of three illustrative sets of noisy data points corresponding to surfaces exhibiting several challenging features. Our experimental results show that the method performs very well even for the cases of noisy and unorganized data points. Therefore, the method can be directly used for real-world applications for reverse engineering without further pre/post-processing. Comparative work with the most classical mathematical techniques for this problem as well as a recent modification of the CSA called Improved CSA (ICSA) is also reported. Two nonparametric statistical tests show that our method outperforms the classical mathematical techniques and provides equivalent results to ICSA for all instances in our benchmark. Full article
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Article
Interactive Cutting of Thin Deformable Objects
Symmetry 2018, 10(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym10010017 - 05 Jan 2018
Viewed by 1624
Abstract
Simulation of cutting is essential for many applications such as virtual surgical training. Most existing methods use the same triangle mesh for both visualization and collision handling, although the requirements for them in the interactive simulation are different. We introduce visual-collision binding between [...] Read more.
Simulation of cutting is essential for many applications such as virtual surgical training. Most existing methods use the same triangle mesh for both visualization and collision handling, although the requirements for them in the interactive simulation are different. We introduce visual-collision binding between high-resolution visual meshes and low-resolution collision meshes, and thus extend the spatially reduced framework to support cutting. There are two phases in our framework: pre-processing and simulation. In the pre-processing phase, the fvisual-collision binding is built based on the computation of geodesic paths. In the simulation phase, the cutting paths are detected on the collision triangles and then mapped to local 2D coordinates systems in which the intersections between visual mesh and the cutting paths are calculated. Both collision and visual meshes are then re-meshed locally. The visual-collision binding is updated after cutting, based on which the collision-simulation and visual-simulation embedding are updated locally. Experimental results show that our cutting method is an efficient and flexible tool for interactive cutting simulation. Full article
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Article
Tangible Visualization Table for Intuitive Data Display
Symmetry 2017, 9(12), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym9120316 - 13 Dec 2017
Viewed by 2383
Abstract
We propose a new tangible visualization table for intuitive and effective visualization of terrain data transferred from a remote server in real time. The shape display approximating the height field of remote terrain data is generated by linear actuators, and the corresponding texture [...] Read more.
We propose a new tangible visualization table for intuitive and effective visualization of terrain data transferred from a remote server in real time. The shape display approximating the height field of remote terrain data is generated by linear actuators, and the corresponding texture image is projected onto the shape display. To minimize projection distortions, we present a sophisticated technique for projection mapping. Gesture-based user interfaces facilitate intuitive manipulations of visualization results. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our system by displaying and manipulating various terrain data using gesture-based interfaces. Full article
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Article
A Study for Parametric Morphogeometric Operators to Assist the Detection of Keratoconus
Symmetry 2017, 9(12), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym9120302 - 05 Dec 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2105
Abstract
The aim of this study is to describe a new keratoconus detection method based on the analysis of certain parametric morphogeometric operators extracted from a custom patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) model of the human cornea. A corneal geometric reconstruction is firstly performed using zonal [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to describe a new keratoconus detection method based on the analysis of certain parametric morphogeometric operators extracted from a custom patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) model of the human cornea. A corneal geometric reconstruction is firstly performed using zonal functions and retrospective Scheimpflug tomography data from 107 eyes of 107 patients. The posterior corneal surface is later analysed using an optimised computational geometry technique and the morphology of healthy and keratoconic corneas is characterized by means of geometric variables. The performance of these variables as predictors of a new geometric marker is assessed through a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and their correlations are analysed through Pearson or Spearman coefficients. The posterior apex deviation variable shows the best keratoconus diagnosis capability. However, the strongest correlations in both healthy and pathological corneas are provided by the metrics directly related to the thickness as the sagittal plane area at the apex and the sagittal plane area at the minimum thickness point. A comparison of the screening of keratoconus provided by the Sirius topographer and the detection of corneal ectasia using the posterior apex deviation parameter is also performed, demonstrating the accuracy of this characterization as an effective marker of the diagnosis and ectatic disease progression. Full article
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Article
Convergence Analysis on a Second Order Algorithm for Orthogonal Projection onto Curves
Symmetry 2017, 9(10), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym9100210 - 01 Oct 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1657
Abstract
Regarding the point projection and inversion problem, a classical algorithm for orthogonal projection onto curves and surfaces has been presented by Hu and Wallner (2005). The objective of this paper is to give a convergence analysis of the projection algorithm. On the point [...] Read more.
Regarding the point projection and inversion problem, a classical algorithm for orthogonal projection onto curves and surfaces has been presented by Hu and Wallner (2005). The objective of this paper is to give a convergence analysis of the projection algorithm. On the point projection problem, we give a formal proof that it is second order convergent and independent of the initial value to project a point onto a planar parameter curve. Meantime, for the point inversion problem, we then give a formal proof that it is third order convergent and independent of the initial value. Full article
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Article
Hybrid Second-Order Iterative Algorithm for Orthogonal Projection onto a Parametric Surface
Symmetry 2017, 9(8), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym9080146 - 05 Aug 2017
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2398
Abstract
To compute the minimum distance between a point and a parametric surface, three well-known first-order algorithms have been proposed by Hartmann (1999), Hoschek, et al. (1993) and Hu, et al. (2000) (hereafter, the First-Order method). In this paper, we prove the method’s first-order [...] Read more.
To compute the minimum distance between a point and a parametric surface, three well-known first-order algorithms have been proposed by Hartmann (1999), Hoschek, et al. (1993) and Hu, et al. (2000) (hereafter, the First-Order method). In this paper, we prove the method’s first-order convergence and its independence of the initial value. We also give some numerical examples to illustrate its faster convergence than the existing methods. For some special cases where the First-Order method does not converge, we combine it with Newton’s second-order iterative method to present the hybrid second-order algorithm. Our method essentially exploits hybrid iteration, thus it performs very well with a second-order convergence, it is faster than the existing methods and it is independent of the initial value. Some numerical examples confirm our conclusion. Full article
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