Special Issue "Traffic Safety within a Sustainable Transportation System"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Alexander Paz

Guest Editor
Science and Engineering Faculty, School of Civil Engineering and Built Environment, Queensland University of Technology
Dr. Naveen Veeramisti

Guest Editor
Traffic Safety and Operations Engineer, CA Group Inc., 2785, S Rainbow Blvd, Las Vegas, NV 89146, USA
Interests: traffic safety; data analytics; traffic operations; network modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Traditional traffic engineering, transportation planning, and traffic safety activities are disconnected. However, actual transportation system performance and its sustainability are highly influenced by the interdependencies among decisions made from these three disciplines. Hence, research addressing interdependencies between traffic safety and other relevant activities is highly desirable. Advancements in analysis, prediction, and mitigation with sustainable transportation and safety considerations are extremely important to improve system performance.

This Special Issue aims to present state-of-the-art research related to recent advancements in sustainable transportation safety. Topics of interest included but are not limited:

  • Sustainable transport policy effects on traffic safety
  • Smart cities with safety and sustainable considerations
  • Environmental effects on sustainable transport and safety
  • Safety data analytics on sustainable transportation
  • Connected and automated vehicles infrastructure systems
  • Impacts of e-commerce and freight systems on traffic safety

Prof. Alexander Paz
Dr. Naveen Veeramisti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable transportation
  • Traffic safety
  • Transport policy
  • Environmental impacts
  • Data analytics
  • Smart cities
  • Automated and connected vehicles

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
An Examination of the Safety Impacts of Bus Priority Routes in Major Israeli Cities
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8617; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208617 - 17 Oct 2020
Abstract
Bus priority routes (BPRs) promote public transport use in urban areas; however, their safety impacts are not sufficiently understood. Along with proven positive mobility effects, such systems may lead to crash increases. This study examines the safety impacts of BPRs, which have been [...] Read more.
Bus priority routes (BPRs) promote public transport use in urban areas; however, their safety impacts are not sufficiently understood. Along with proven positive mobility effects, such systems may lead to crash increases. This study examines the safety impacts of BPRs, which have been introduced on busy urban roads in three major Israeli cities—Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and Haifa. Crash changes associated with BPR implementation are estimated using after–before or cross-section evaluations, with comparison-groups. The findings show that BPR implementation is generally associated with increasing trends in various crash types and, particularly, in pedestrian crashes at junctions. Yet, the results differ depending on BPR configurations. Center lane BPRs are found to be safer than curbside BPRs. The best safety level is observed when a center lane BPR is adjacent to a single lane for all-purpose traffic. Local public transport planners should be aware of possible negative implications of BPRs for urban traffic safety. Negative safety impacts can be moderated by a wider use of safety-related measures, as demonstrated in BPRs’ operation in Haifa. Further research is needed to delve into the reasons for the negative safety impacts of BPRs under Israeli conditions relative to the positive impacts reported in other countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety within a Sustainable Transportation System)
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Open AccessArticle
Safety Analysis of a Modified Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control Algorithm Accounting for Communication Delay
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7568; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187568 - 14 Sep 2020
Abstract
Cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) is a promising technology to improve traffic efficiency and enhance road safety. In this paper, a modified CACC control model considering the communication time delay is proposed, which is used to investigate the longitudinal safety impacts of the [...] Read more.
Cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) is a promising technology to improve traffic efficiency and enhance road safety. In this paper, a modified CACC control model considering the communication time delay is proposed, which is used to investigate the longitudinal safety impacts of the communication time delay to the CACC platoon. Then, the communication time delay model is integrated into the CACC model to simulate the realistic information transfer process in the CACC platoon. Then a microscopic CACC platoon simulation is designed and conducted to verify the feasibility and reliability of the modified CACC control algorithm. The obtained results reveal that the modified CACC control algorithm can not only reduce about 96.6% of inter-vehicle spacing error, but also enhance the vehicles’ ability to sense the upstream traffic changes. Furthermore, to quantitatively analyze the longitudinal safety influence of the time delay caused by representative communication systems, sensitivity analysis experiments of headway time were designed and conducted. In the sensitivity analysis, the time exposed time-to-collision (TET) and the time-integrated time-to-collision (TIT) were introduced as the key performance indicators (KPIs) to quantify the rear-end collision risks. Sensitivity analysis results demonstrate that the performance of the CACC platoon is strictly related to the applied wireless communication style. Furthermore, the CACC system supported by the 5th generation (5G) communication system shows great advantages in narrowing the minimal headway time gap and reducing the rear-end collision risks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety within a Sustainable Transportation System)
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Open AccessArticle
Road Investment and Traffic Safety: An International Study
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6332; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166332 - 06 Aug 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The aim of this study is to analyse whether the economic resources invested in roads—both investment in construction and expenditure on maintenance and conservation—have any influence on road fatality rates. Since this is a complex problem, and because there are many factors that [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to analyse whether the economic resources invested in roads—both investment in construction and expenditure on maintenance and conservation—have any influence on road fatality rates. Since this is a complex problem, and because there are many factors that can influence the fatality rate, other variables related to specific transport, socioeconomic and meteorological factors are also considered. The study was carried out using a panel data model, modelling road mortality as a function of 12 variables. The scope of the study is international, focusing on the interurban road network. Data were collected from 23 European countries for the period 1998–2016. The main results obtained are that both expenditure on road maintenance and conservation and the proportion of motorways in the total road network contribute to reducing road mortality. Contrariwise, greater investment in construction leads to an increase in the fatality rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety within a Sustainable Transportation System)
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Open AccessArticle
Classification of Inter-Urban Highway Drivers’ Resting Behavior for Advanced Driver-Assistance System Technologies using Vehicle Trajectory Data from Car Navigation Systems
Sustainability 2020, 12(15), 5936; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12155936 - 23 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Fatigue-related crashes, which are mainly caused by drowsy or distracted driving, account for a significant portion of fatal accidents on highways. Smart vehicle technologies can address this issue of road safety to improve the sustainability of transportation systems. Advanced driver-assistance system (ADAS) can [...] Read more.
Fatigue-related crashes, which are mainly caused by drowsy or distracted driving, account for a significant portion of fatal accidents on highways. Smart vehicle technologies can address this issue of road safety to improve the sustainability of transportation systems. Advanced driver-assistance system (ADAS) can aid drowsy drivers by recommending and guiding them to rest locations. Past research shows a significant correlation between driving distance and driver fatigue, which has been actively studied in the analysis of resting behavior. Previous research efforts have mainly relied on survey methods at specific locations, such as rest areas or toll booths. However, such traditional methods, like field surveys, are expensive and often produce biased results, based on sample location and time. This research develops methods to better estimate travel resting behavior by utilizing a large-scale dataset obtained from car navigation systems, which contain 591,103 vehicle trajectories collected over a period of four months in 2014. We propose an algorithm to statistically categorize drivers according to driving distances and their number of rests. The main algorithm combines a statistical hypothesis test and a random sampling method based on the renowned Monte-Carlo simulation technique. We were able to verify that cumulative travel distance shares a significant relationship with one’s resting decisions. Furthermore, this research identifies the resting behavior pattern of drivers based upon their travel distances. Our methodology can be used by sustainable traffic safety operators to their driver guiding strategies criterion using their own data. Not only will our methodology be able to aid sustainable traffic safety operators in constructing their driver guidance strategies criterion using their own data, but it could also be implemented in actual car navigation systems as a mid-term solution. We expect that ADAS combined with the proposed algorithm will contribute to improving traffic safety and to assisting the sustainability of road systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety within a Sustainable Transportation System)
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Open AccessArticle
Relationships between Body Mass Index and Self-Reported Motorcycle Crashes in Vietnam
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1382; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041382 - 13 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The relationship between overweight, obesity, or body mass index (BMI) and crashes among drivers of passenger cars, vans, and trucks has been the focus of much research. However, little is understood about this relationship among motorcyclists, particularly motorcycle taxi drivers who tend to [...] Read more.
The relationship between overweight, obesity, or body mass index (BMI) and crashes among drivers of passenger cars, vans, and trucks has been the focus of much research. However, little is understood about this relationship among motorcyclists, particularly motorcycle taxi drivers who tend to work long hours. Motorcycle taxis are an increasingly popular and important mode of travel in many cities, especially in South-East Asia, due partly to the rise of ride-hailing services. This paper assesses the body mass index (BMI) of motorcycle taxi drivers in Vietnam and its impacts on crashes among three types of drivers (traditional, ride-hailing, and hybrid). Data from a structured questionnaire survey of motorcycle taxi drivers conducted in Hanoi, Vietnam were used. Results show that 18.8% of motorcycle taxi drivers were overweight or obese whereas only 1.4% were underweight. Fulltime motorcycle taxi drivers were more likely to be overweight or obese. Results of random effect binary logistic regression show that overweight and obese motorcycle taxi drivers had significantly higher overall and injury crash risks, when compared to normal-weight motorcycle taxi drivers. Results also indicate that hybrid motorcycle taxi drivers had lower overall and injury crash risks when compared to traditional motorcycle taxi drivers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety within a Sustainable Transportation System)
Open AccessArticle
Forecasting Road Traffic Deaths in Thailand: Applications of Time-Series, Curve Estimation, Multiple Linear Regression, and Path Analysis Models
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 395; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010395 - 03 Jan 2020
Cited by 4
Abstract
In 2018, 19,931 people were killed in road accidents in Thailand. Thus, reduction in the number of accidents is urgently required. To provide a master plan for reducing the number of accidents, future forecast data are required. Thus, we aimed to identify the [...] Read more.
In 2018, 19,931 people were killed in road accidents in Thailand. Thus, reduction in the number of accidents is urgently required. To provide a master plan for reducing the number of accidents, future forecast data are required. Thus, we aimed to identify the appropriate forecasting method. We considered four methods in this study: Time-series analysis, curve estimation, regression analysis, and path analysis. The data used in the analysis included death rate per 100,000 population, gross domestic product (GDP), the number of registered vehicles (motorcycles, cars, and trucks), and energy consumption of the transportation sector. The results show that the best three models, based on the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), are the multiple linear regression model 3, time-series with exponential smoothing, and path analysis, with MAPE values of 6.4%, 8.1%, and 8.4%, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety within a Sustainable Transportation System)
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Open AccessArticle
Factors Contributing to the Relationship between Driving Mileage and Crash Frequency of Older Drivers
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6643; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236643 - 24 Nov 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
As a characteristic of senior drivers aged 65 +, the low-mileage bias has been reported in previous studies. While it is thought to be a well-known phenomenon caused by aging, the characteristics of urban environments create more opportunities for crashes. This calls for [...] Read more.
As a characteristic of senior drivers aged 65 +, the low-mileage bias has been reported in previous studies. While it is thought to be a well-known phenomenon caused by aging, the characteristics of urban environments create more opportunities for crashes. This calls for investigating the low-mileage bias and scrutinizing whether it has the same impact on other age groups, such as young and middle-aged drivers. We use a crash database from the Ohio Department of Public Safety from 2006 to 2011 and adopt a macro approach using Negative Binomial models and Conditional Autoregressive (CAR) models to deal with a spatial autocorrelation issue. Aside from the low-mileage bias issue, we examine the association between the number of crashes and the built environment and socio-economic and demographic factors. We confirm that the number of crashes is associated with vehicle miles traveled, which suggests that more accumulated driving miles result in a lower likelihood of being involved in a crash. This implies that drivers in the low mileage group are involved in crashes more often, regardless of the driver’s age. The results also confirm that more complex urban environments have a higher number of crashes than rural environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety within a Sustainable Transportation System)
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