Next Article in Journal
Getting Involved with Vaccination. Swiss Student Teachers’ Reactions to a Public Vaccination Debate
Next Article in Special Issue
Forecasting Road Traffic Deaths in Thailand: Applications of Time-Series, Curve Estimation, Multiple Linear Regression, and Path Analysis Models
Previous Article in Journal
Values and Green Product Purchase Behavior: The Moderating Effects of the Role of Government and Media Exposure
Open AccessArticle

Factors Contributing to the Relationship between Driving Mileage and Crash Frequency of Older Drivers

1
Department of Public Administration, Kangwon National University, 1 Gangwondaehak-gil, Seoksa-dong, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24341, Korea
2
Department of City and Regional Planning, Ohio State University, 275 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6643; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236643
Received: 21 October 2019 / Revised: 19 November 2019 / Accepted: 22 November 2019 / Published: 24 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic Safety within a Sustainable Transportation System)
As a characteristic of senior drivers aged 65 +, the low-mileage bias has been reported in previous studies. While it is thought to be a well-known phenomenon caused by aging, the characteristics of urban environments create more opportunities for crashes. This calls for investigating the low-mileage bias and scrutinizing whether it has the same impact on other age groups, such as young and middle-aged drivers. We use a crash database from the Ohio Department of Public Safety from 2006 to 2011 and adopt a macro approach using Negative Binomial models and Conditional Autoregressive (CAR) models to deal with a spatial autocorrelation issue. Aside from the low-mileage bias issue, we examine the association between the number of crashes and the built environment and socio-economic and demographic factors. We confirm that the number of crashes is associated with vehicle miles traveled, which suggests that more accumulated driving miles result in a lower likelihood of being involved in a crash. This implies that drivers in the low mileage group are involved in crashes more often, regardless of the driver’s age. The results also confirm that more complex urban environments have a higher number of crashes than rural environments. View Full-Text
Keywords: low-mileage bias; traffic crash; older driver; spatial analysis; traffic safety low-mileage bias; traffic crash; older driver; spatial analysis; traffic safety
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, D.; Guldmann, J.-M.; Choi, C. Factors Contributing to the Relationship between Driving Mileage and Crash Frequency of Older Drivers. Sustainability 2019, 11, 6643.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop