Special Issue "Sustainable Citizenship and Education"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Education and Approaches".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Eloy López Meneses
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Education and Social Psychology. Area of School Organization and Didactics. Pablo de Olavide University. 41013, Spain
Interests: ICT in Education; Didactics; MOOCs; Online and Ubiquitous learning
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Emilio José Delgado-Algarra
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Integrated Didactics, Universidad de Huelva, Avenida de la Fuerzas Armadas, S/N, 21007 Huelva, Spain
Interests: educational technologies; digital citizenship; didactics of social sciences; didactics of history; citizenship education; historical memory; teacher training
Dr. César Bernal-Bravo
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Education Sciences, Language, Culture and Arts, Rey Juan Carlos University, Paseo Artilleros s/n, 28032 Madrid, Spain
Interests: digital citizenship; citizenship education; didactics of social sciences; innovation in social sciences; use of ICTs in social sciences
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonio Alejandro Lorca-Marín
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Integrated Didactics, Universidad de Huelva, Avenida de la Fuerzas Armadas, S/N, 21007 Huelva, Spain
Interests: educational technologies; didactics of experimental sciences; conceptions; teacher training; problem-based learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last several decades, habitat loss, the overexploitation of natural resources, and pollution have led to catastrophic decreases in biodiversity 1. Sustainability represents the maximal achievement using the minimumfrom environmental, social, and economic points of view, considering climatic responsiveness, efficiency, and the balance between the natural environment and artificial configurations 2,3. Since the 1980s, together with the impulse of globalization, the debate on what citizenship is and how to educate for democratic citizenship has intensified, with the participation of universities, public institutions, and international organizations 4. In accordance with the current environmental situation, sustainable citizenship and education have become key elements to ensure the future of humanity, and they are essential to foster sustainability awareness, critical participation, and socio-environmental improvement.

Connected with the importance of sustainable citizenship participation and sustainable education, the United Nations published The Sustainable Development Goals 5, which include aspects such as Quality Education (Goal 4), Sustainable Cities and Communities (Goal 11), Responsible Consumption and Production (Goal 12), Climate Action (Goal 13), and Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions (Goal 16). Regarding this, education has become a fundamental means for transformation of the economy and society around the welfare of citizens, the sustainability of human activities, and the stability of the environment.

The scope of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for researchers to share their innovative work, in the form of conceptual and research articles, about the role of education in fostering sustainable commitment, sustainable participation, and social and economic transformation, among other related issues. This special section will focus on (but is not limited to) the following topics:

  • Sustainable citizenship education;
  • Educational institutions and sustainable citizenship;
  • Educational approaches and sustainable citizenship;
  • Education for sustainable commitment;
  • Education for sustainable participation;
  • Sustainable education for social transformation;
  • Sustainable cities and education;
  • Sustainable communities and education;
  • Education for responsible consumption;
  • Education for climate action;
  • Education for peace;
  • Justice-oriented education.

Dr. Eloy López Meneses
Dr. Emilio José Delgado-Algarra
Dr. César Bernal-Bravo
Dr. Antonio Alejandro Lorca-Marín
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • educational institutions
  • educational approaches
  • sustainable citizenship education
  • education for sustainable commitment
  • education for sustainable participation
  • sustainable education for social transformation
  • sustainable cities
  • sustainable communities
  • education for responsible consumption
  • education for climate action
  • education for peace
  • justice-oriented education

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Citizenship Training through sMOOCs: A Participative and Intercreative Learning
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8301; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208301 - 09 Oct 2020
Abstract
sMOOCs (social massive open online courses) have revealed themselves as a remarkable opportunity to foster the culture of participation and open knowledge and sustainability. Due to their communicative potential, they make it possible for participants to interact, to create ubiquitous learning, and to [...] Read more.
sMOOCs (social massive open online courses) have revealed themselves as a remarkable opportunity to foster the culture of participation and open knowledge and sustainability. Due to their communicative potential, they make it possible for participants to interact, to create ubiquitous learning, and to build knowledge in a collective way. This educational and communicative line has set the basis for the European ECO (e-learning, communication, open data) Project, i.e., the purpose of our study, which, beyond training teachers, is decidedly betting on open life-long education. The results presented in the study have been elicited by following a quantitative methodology, through the analysis of a “sMOOC Step by Step” community, intended to become an educational gate to students’ empowerment, shared knowledge, and participation in the course. Results show that collaborative work practices organized by teachers in that virtual learning community encourage educational changes. Both the degree of satisfaction with the learning achieved and the way students perceive its direct applicability to real-life professional contexts prove the effectiveness of this training model. Our research has expanded, aiming to discover sMOOCs opportunities for teacher training and assessing the motivation shown by the virtual learning community towards such an educational reality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Citizenship and Education)
Open AccessArticle
Social Networks Consumption and Addiction in College Students during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Educational Approach to Responsible Use
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7737; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187737 - 18 Sep 2020
Abstract
Within the framework of digital sustainability, the increase in Internet consumption, and especially online social networks, offers social benefits, but is not without its drawbacks. For example, it can lead to psychological and/or psychiatric disorders in some people. Numerous researches are highlighting the [...] Read more.
Within the framework of digital sustainability, the increase in Internet consumption, and especially online social networks, offers social benefits, but is not without its drawbacks. For example, it can lead to psychological and/or psychiatric disorders in some people. Numerous researches are highlighting the similarities of these addictions with the consumption of toxic substances. University students are heavy users of the Internet and, in certain situations, addiction to online social networks can be the result of depression, harassment, and anxiety, among others, affecting their daily life, including their academic responsibilities. In recent months, an anomaly has occurred that may have contributed to intensifying this problem, namely the confinement produced by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has affected the whole world to a greater or lesser extent. In this cross-sectional study, with a descriptive and quantitative methodology, students from 14 Spanish universities were investigated in the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in order to understand the effects of this situation on the problem described. The results show a high consumption of social networks during that time, with significant incidences of addiction. In parallel, the presence of comorbidity has been determined. In this scenario, it would be necessary to implement university educational programs to redirect these addictive behaviors, as well as preventative recommendations and actions to minimize negative impacts. This is a major problem that is growing, exacerbated by the global pandemic produced by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Situations of this gravity call for the development of preventive and educational measures for the responsible and sustainable use of ICT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Citizenship and Education)
Open AccessArticle
Influence of ICTs on Math Teaching–Learning Processes and Their Connection to the Digital Gender Gap
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6692; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166692 - 18 Aug 2020
Abstract
This study presents research aimed at analyzing whether, in contrast with traditional methodologies, the usage of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the process of learning mathematics affects gender distinctions by affecting the low rate of matriculation of women into technological studies. The [...] Read more.
This study presents research aimed at analyzing whether, in contrast with traditional methodologies, the usage of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the process of learning mathematics affects gender distinctions by affecting the low rate of matriculation of women into technological studies. The research was carried out by utilizing a quasi-experimental pretest–posttest procedure using a non-equivalent control group with traditional teaching methodology (textbook and usual drawing tools), and an experimental group, in which a classroom wiki and its digital equivalents were used in the Cabri, Geogebra, and Descartes programs. A quantifiable comparison of the effects on teaching was performed by assessing the strengths and weaknesses of employing ICTs. The results show a higher motivation in the experimental group, evident in their learning and their better marks compared to those of the control group. In addition, in the pretest and posttest, women’s marks were better than those of men. In conclusion, the transformation of the teaching–learning methodologies in mathematics is demanded with the use of programs such as Dynamic Geometry or Geogebra, which enable greater student involvement and more meaningful and relevant learning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Citizenship and Education)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Citizenship and Pluriculturalism Approaches of Teachers in the Hispanic and Japanese Contexts: Higher Education Research
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3109; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083109 - 13 Apr 2020
Abstract
Current higher education policies include several challenges, such as the academic internationalization of universities, mobility, and cultural plurality. Beyond the official curriculum, university educators have conceptions of citizenship and pluricultural competence. To understand the conceptions of educators on both topics in the Hispanic [...] Read more.
Current higher education policies include several challenges, such as the academic internationalization of universities, mobility, and cultural plurality. Beyond the official curriculum, university educators have conceptions of citizenship and pluricultural competence. To understand the conceptions of educators on both topics in the Hispanic and Japanese contexts of higher education, this article presents a quantitative study involving a collaboration between a sample of education and social sciences teaching staff from universities in Spain and Japan. The CYASPS® (Citizenship and Plurilingual Social Actors in Higher Education) instrument and a categories system were designed for data collection and analysis with the support of SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) software. Using a comparative approach, this study investigated the teaching staffs’ conceptions about citizenship and pluricultural teaching–learning environments, which focused on their views regarding different kinds of citizenship, citizens’ participation, and sources for the development of pluricultural competences. Based on a descriptive and factorial analysis, there were significant correlations between citizenship and pluricultural competence, with relevant connections between key aspects of pluricultural competence, including awareness of the rights from the liberal citizenship model, civic commitment of the republican citizenship model, and several elements of cosmopolitan and radical citizenship. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Citizenship and Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Student Concepts after a Didactic Experiment in Heritage Education
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 3046; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12073046 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This work highlights the importance of heritage education as a vehicle for citizen education. We present an analysis of concepts of heritage, citizenship, and territory held by third-year social science students. The results are obtained from statistical analysis of a questionnaire given before [...] Read more.
This work highlights the importance of heritage education as a vehicle for citizen education. We present an analysis of concepts of heritage, citizenship, and territory held by third-year social science students. The results are obtained from statistical analysis of a questionnaire given before and after a didactic intervention and the application of a table of categories drawn up based on heritage education in terms of the parameters we consider desirable, from a holistic, socio-critical, motivating, and participatory perspective. The outcomes show the success of the intervention, with the students presenting better reflective and critical knowledge of their environment, showing appreciation, respect, protection, and dissemination of heritage as a symbol of identity and favoring the commitment to sustainable actions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Citizenship and Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
An Integrated Model Approach of Education for Sustainable Development: Exploring the Concepts of Water, Energy and Waste in Primary Education
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2947; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072947 - 07 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Education for Sustainable Development requires improving the knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of students at all levels of education. However, this should start from the earliest stages of education, promoting an effective teaching/learning process of key concepts for sustainable development. Accordingly, the general objective [...] Read more.
Education for Sustainable Development requires improving the knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of students at all levels of education. However, this should start from the earliest stages of education, promoting an effective teaching/learning process of key concepts for sustainable development. Accordingly, the general objective of this research was to analyze the concepts of water, energy and waste in the primary education curriculum (6–12 years) in Spain. A qualitative research approach was followed, with an exploratory and descriptive design. A system of categories was established for each of the concepts under study, with the aim of classifying the references found, analyzing their integration into the different subjects, academic courses, curricular elements and levels of cognitive demand required of the students. The results of the lexicographical analysis of the content reveal that the regulations governing primary education in Spain mainly focus on the concept of energy and, to a lesser extent, on the concepts of water and waste. In addition, cognitive levels of knowledge and comprehension predominate based on the taxonomy used. The results suggest the need to develop initiatives for the educational framework that promote not only learning, but also attitudes and behaviors that contribute to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Citizenship and Education)
Back to TopTop