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Bridging Peace and Sustainability amidst Global Transformations

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Social Ecology and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 3632

Special Issue Editors

Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1, Higashihiroshimashi 739-8530, Japan
Interests: international relations; peacebuilding; peace–sustainability nexus Anthropocene
Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation, Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima 739-8527, Japan
Interests: development and environment; field experiments; environmental economics and policy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The conceptual and empirical linkages between peace and sustainability are widely recognized in academic and policy circles. The adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development confirms this recognition. However, many initiatives on peace and sustainability continue to operate in silos, undermining the positive and mutually reinforcing relationship between them. An enhanced integration of peace and sustainability components is imperative for addressing complex challenges that come with global transformations and are manifested environmentally, socially, politically, and economically across levels. It is therefore crucial to identify the pathways that enhance the peace-promoting potential of sustainability and the sustainability-promoting potential of peace. Since 2018, the Network for Education and Research on Peace and Sustainability (NERPS) at Hiroshima University has led several initiatives aimed at providing a better understanding of the complex and dynamic interactions between peace and sustainability. These include a Special Issue published in Sustainability Science (Sharifi et al., 2021) and several articles and book chapters focused on this nexus (Sharifi and Simangan, 2021; Sharifi, Simangan, et al., 2021a, 2021b; Sharifi, Simangan, Kaneko, et al., 2021; Simangan et al., 2021). This Special Issue of Sustainability aims to build on these efforts by focusing on various pathways that bridge peace promotion and sustainable development. We encourage researchers and practitioners to submit original research articles, case studies, reviews, critical perspectives, and viewpoint articles on topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Interactions between SDG 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) and other SDGs;
  • Co-benefits and synergies between peace and sustainability efforts;
  • Trade-offs and conflicts between peace and sustainability efforts;
  • Peace– sustainability nexus under future climate and development scenarios;
  • Contributions of peacebuilding efforts to climate change adaptation and mitigation;
  • International collaboration for promoting peace and sustainability;
  • Integrated approaches towards peace and sustainability;
  • Integrated assessment of peace and sustainability initiatives;
  • The varied manifestations of peace and sustainability at different scales;
  • Climate-sensitive approaches to conflict resolution and post-conflict peacebuilding;
  • The future of environmental cooperation and peacebuilding;

Note: This Special Issue is associated with the “NERPS Conference 2023” held in Bangkok, Thailand, from Feb 28-Mar 3, 2023. APC waivers will be available for selected papers from the conference. For more details, see: https://nerps.org/thailand_nerps2023/.

References

Sharifi, A.; Simangan, D. Environmental Sustainability: The Missing Pillar of Positive Peace. In K. Standish, H. Devere, A. Suazo, & R. Rafferty (Eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Positive Peace,2021, pp 1-19, Springer, Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-15-3877-3_35-1.

Sharifi, A.; Simangan, D.; Kaneko, S. The literature landscape on peace–sustainability nexus: A scientometric analysis. Ambio, 2021a, 50(3), 661-678. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-020-01388-8.

Sharifi, A.; Simangan, D.; Kaneko, S. Three decades of research on climate change and peace: a bibliometrics analysis. Sustainability Science, 2021b, 16(4), 1079-1095. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11625-020-00853-3.

Sharifi, A.; Simangan, D.; Kaneko, S.; Virji, H. The sustainability–peace nexus: why is it important? Sustainability Science, 2021, 16(4), 1073-1077. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11625-021-00986-z.

Simangan, D.; Sharifi, A.; Kaneko, S. Positive Peace Pillars and Sustainability Dimensions: An Analytical Framework. International Studies Review, 2021, 23(4), 1884-1905. https://doi.org/10.1093/isr/viab054.

Dr. Ayyoob Sharifi
Dr. Dahlia Simangan
Prof. Dr. Shinji Kaneko
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • sustainability
  • peace
  • global change
  • SDGs
  • peace-sustainability nexus

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1101 KiB  
Article
Climate Change and Cereal Crops Productivity in Afghanistan: Evidence Based on Panel Regression Model
Sustainability 2023, 15(14), 10963; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151410963 - 13 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1782
Abstract
Afghanistan frequently faces drought and other climate change-related challenges due to rising temperatures and decreased precipitation in many areas of the country. Therefore, acquiring a thorough comprehension of the implications of climate change on the cultivation of key cereal crops is of the [...] Read more.
Afghanistan frequently faces drought and other climate change-related challenges due to rising temperatures and decreased precipitation in many areas of the country. Therefore, acquiring a thorough comprehension of the implications of climate change on the cultivation of key cereal crops is of the utmost importance. This is particularly significant in the context of Afghanistan, where the agricultural sector plays a pivotal role, contributing close to a quarter of the country’s national gross domestic product and serving as the primary source of employment for 70% of the rural workforce. In this paper, we employ a panel regression model to evaluate the relationship between climate change and cereal productivity in Afghanistan’s agro-climatic zones. Temperature had a significant negative impact, implying that a mean temperature increase of 1 °C decreased wheat and barley yields by 271 and 221 kg/ha, respectively. Future medium- and high-emission scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5, respectively) for the period 2021–2050 were considered for future yield predictions. To project future climate change impacts, the estimated panel data regression coefficients were used to compute the projected changes in cereal yields. During the period 2021–2050, the mean yield of wheat is projected to decrease by 21 or 28%, the rice yield will decrease by 4.92 or 6.10%, and the barley yield will decrease by 387 or 535 kg/ha in the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios, respectively, further emphasizing the need for targeted actions to tackle the effects of climate change on agriculture in Afghanistan in alignment with SDG 2 (Zero Hunger) and SDG 13 (Climate Action). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bridging Peace and Sustainability amidst Global Transformations)
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22 pages, 2114 KiB  
Article
Investigating Risks to the Implementation of the Great Equatorial Landbridge (GELB) Highway Project across Africa
Sustainability 2023, 15(14), 10905; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151410905 - 12 Jul 2023
Viewed by 939
Abstract
Transboundary Trade Corridors (TTC) are becoming increasingly important for achieving national, regional, and global development objectives. However, the cross-boundary nature of these projects involves dealing with diverse contexts that span across different countries and involve multiple stakeholders with varying interests. These circumstances exacerbate [...] Read more.
Transboundary Trade Corridors (TTC) are becoming increasingly important for achieving national, regional, and global development objectives. However, the cross-boundary nature of these projects involves dealing with diverse contexts that span across different countries and involve multiple stakeholders with varying interests. These circumstances exacerbate the risks and uncertainties that arise during their implementation, intensifying the challenges involved in making decisions about how to proceed with their execution. Insufficient evaluations of development projects have been identified as a contributing factor to unforeseen risks, which in turn can result in the underperformance and failure of transportation infrastructure projects. This ultimately acts as an impediment to achieving sustainable development goals. Further, rapid deployment of post risk-event corrective measures can exacerbate, for instance, macro-economic crisis and civil unrest. The Great Equatorial Land Bridge is a TTC planned to traverse five countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic, South-Sudan, Ethiopia, and Kenya. Despite the anticipated advantages for globalization, political cooperation, and regional integration, the risks that must be addressed to successfully implement this project are still uncertain. We, therefore, use a Multicriteria Decision-Making (MCDM) framework to investigate risks to its successful implementation. The analysis results highlight that effectively managing economic, political, and geographic risks is crucial for the successful implementation of the project. Policy-makers, contractors and multiple stakeholders will benefit from this study’s depiction of the risks and their relative importance. Results can also inform actions toward sustainable development of the project. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bridging Peace and Sustainability amidst Global Transformations)
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