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Special Issue "Sustainability in Leadership and Education"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Osman Titrek

Sakarya University Faculty of Education Educational Sciences Department Educational Administration and Supervision Program Postal Code: 54300 Hendek, Sakarya, Turkey
Website | E-Mail
Interests: lifelong learning; leadership; education; entrepreneurship; creativity; innovation; sustainability; development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Defined as the ability of being permanent, sustainability is addressed with many different topics in ecologic, economic and social fields. Therefore, it can be claimed that sustainability is an important term which embraces the requirements of today’s world. Nowadays, there are efforts to keep living in each field all over world. Some of these fields which have concerns about maintaining their lifespans are education and leadership. Education provides people to maintain their lives, and covers all human lifetime. Therefore, it is expected that lifelong learning, defined as learning from the cradle to the grave, and sustainability are related to each other. One the other hand, leadership gives opportunity people to gather others around a specific purpose. In this context, it guides people and maintains their lives. Therefore, it can be claimed that leadership in all different fields can be in relationship between sustainability.

This Special Issue aims to shed light on the relationships between sustainability and education, and administration. In this respect, this issue directly focuses on sustainability from the viewpoint of lifelong education and leadership. Authors from different speciality fields, such as education, psychology, social sciences, ecology, business administration etc. are invited to submit their studies about the possible relationships between lifelong education, leadership and sustainability. All the theoretical and practical studies are accepted in this issue. The importance of this study is to enlighten sustainability in terms of both maintaining and managing lives. For this reason, different studies from different specialty fields are welcomed in this issue.

Prof. Dr. Osman Titrek
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • leadership
  • lifelong education
  • sustainability

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ethical Leadership, Affective Commitment, Work Engagement, and Creativity: Testing a Multiple Mediation Approach
Sustainability 2019, 11(16), 4489; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164489
Received: 11 July 2019 / Revised: 15 August 2019 / Accepted: 16 August 2019 / Published: 19 August 2019
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Abstract
This study aimed to explore the relationships among ethical leadership (EL), affective commitment (AC), work engagement (WE), and employees’ creativity (EC). In total, 233 Chinese public sector employees completed the survey in three phases. We used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation [...] Read more.
This study aimed to explore the relationships among ethical leadership (EL), affective commitment (AC), work engagement (WE), and employees’ creativity (EC). In total, 233 Chinese public sector employees completed the survey in three phases. We used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) to analyze the data. The paper found positive relationships between EL and WE and with EL and EC. The results further revealed that AC partially mediates the EL-WE relationship, while both AC and WE fully mediate the relationship between EL and EC. Testing these relationships via a multiple-mediated approach significantly contributed to the existing research on leadership. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
Open AccessArticle
A Sustainable Approach to Mental Health Education: An Empirical Study Using Zhuangzi’s Self-Adaptation
Sustainability 2019, 11(13), 3677; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11133677
Received: 21 February 2019 / Revised: 21 June 2019 / Accepted: 26 June 2019 / Published: 4 July 2019
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Abstract
No one can avoid feeling frustrated, and contemporary schools should take the lead in supporting mental health. A sustainable approach to such education can be found in Zhuangzi (ca 369–ca 286 BCE), a representative of Taoist schools who is credited with writing the [...] Read more.
No one can avoid feeling frustrated, and contemporary schools should take the lead in supporting mental health. A sustainable approach to such education can be found in Zhuangzi (ca 369–ca 286 BCE), a representative of Taoist schools who is credited with writing the Zhuangzi, a philosophical and literary text. The first section of this study uses qualitative research methods to identify 70 concepts regarding self-adaptation in the Zhuangzi and classifies them into 11 categories. The individual sentences from which these concepts originated are then logically reordered by category to create texts that aid a reader’s understanding of Zhuangzi’s philosophy. The second section of this study uses purposive sampling through an online questionnaire to consider university student feedback on self-adaptation philosophy. Overall, 84.12% of students agreed or strongly agreed that self-adaptation could help them deal with frustration, and 40.80% of students identified the category “mental state” as the most helpful. Furthermore, 88.91% of students reported that thinking about their mental state was most helpful in interpersonal relationship situations. Thus, self-adaptation offers individuals a sustainable, healthy means of dealing with life’s challenges. The findings of this study may have far-reaching impacts on European and American society by cultivating the general public’s interest in Zhuangzi’s philosophy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Perceived Barriers to Implementing Education for Sustainable Development among Korean Teachers
Sustainability 2019, 11(9), 2532; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11092532
Received: 3 April 2019 / Revised: 24 April 2019 / Accepted: 26 April 2019 / Published: 1 May 2019
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Abstract
The objective of this study was to identify whether there are any homogeneous subclasses of teachers exhibiting different profiles of barriers to implementing ESD among Korean secondary teachers, and to examine whether teachers’ experiences of taking an ESD course in their pre-service teacher [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to identify whether there are any homogeneous subclasses of teachers exhibiting different profiles of barriers to implementing ESD among Korean secondary teachers, and to examine whether teachers’ experiences of taking an ESD course in their pre-service teacher education and in their in-service training on ESD are predictive of membership in subclasses of perceived barriers to implementing ESD. Korean secondary teachers from various subjects were selected as a sample. I carried out latent class analysis (LCA) on barrier variables and assessed the association of both the experiences of taking an ESD course in their pre-service teacher education and in-service training on ESD with membership in the latent subclasses using multi-nominal logistic regression. These analyses were performed using PROC LCA. Research results are as follows: Firstly, four latent classes were identified: the few barrier, the individual barrier, the combination of individual and class-driven structural barrier, and the combination of individual and structural barrier. Secondly, both the experiences of taking an ESD course in their pre-service teacher education and in-service training on ESD were significant predictors of latent class membership. The current study could potentially assist both pre-service teacher educational institutions and in-service teacher training organizations with strategies designed to improve ESD competency among teachers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Does Project Children’s University Increase Academic Self-Efficacy in 6th Graders? A Weak Experimental Design
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 778; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030778
Received: 16 December 2018 / Revised: 26 January 2019 / Accepted: 28 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
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Abstract
The purpose of this study is to determine whether students’ academic self-efficacy levels increase through a 20 week of education that is based on the problem-based learning theory and transmitted in an inter-disciplinary manner in Project Children’s University. The project aimed to teach [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to determine whether students’ academic self-efficacy levels increase through a 20 week of education that is based on the problem-based learning theory and transmitted in an inter-disciplinary manner in Project Children’s University. The project aimed to teach students to learn how to learn. Eventually, students will be life-long learners and gain sustainable learning skills. In order to observe the effect of Project Children’s University, academic self-efficacy levels are measured in terms of “self-efficacy in ability”, “context”, and “education quality domains”. Changes in treatment group students’ academic self-efficacy levels are modeled in growth curve modeling framework throughout three waves. Then, they are compared with those of control group students using Welch’s t test. Results have shown that the levels of academic self-efficacy throughout the research have fallen significantly for the treatment group students. In addition, the levels of self-efficacy in ability of the treatment group students were significantly higher than the levels of the control group students. On the other hand, the levels of context of the treatment group students were significantly lower than the levels of the control group students. In conclusion, Project Children’s University has failed to increase students’ academic self-efficacy levels, but entitled them to understand what academic self-efficacy really means, to socialize, to be self-confident students, and to criticize themselves more rationally. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Sustainability of Cooperative Professional Development: Focused on Teachers’ Efficacy
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 585; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030585
Received: 15 September 2018 / Revised: 16 January 2019 / Accepted: 17 January 2019 / Published: 23 January 2019
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Abstract
In this study, we aim to gain critical insights into how cooperative professional development affects teachers’ efficacy. To this end, the purpose of this study is to identify cooperative professional development types (CPD-type) and to reveal the relationship between CPD-type and teachers’ efficacy [...] Read more.
In this study, we aim to gain critical insights into how cooperative professional development affects teachers’ efficacy. To this end, the purpose of this study is to identify cooperative professional development types (CPD-type) and to reveal the relationship between CPD-type and teachers’ efficacy in Korean middle schools, controlling for gender, age, years of experience and school climate. The data of this study are derived from the 2013 Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) conducted by the OECD. The K-mean cluster analysis was used to identify distinct clusters of middle school teachers based on CPD. This process identified four specific groups: the disengaged group (36.8%), the collaborative group (11.3%), the activity-focused group (24.8%), and the coordinative group (27.1%). Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that all dummy variables of CPD-type were statistically significant, controlling for gender, age, years of experience, and school climate. Comparing the relative importance of each variable on teachers’ efficacy, the CPD1 (1 = the collaborative group) variable was most important. The results of this study provide a rationale for teachers to participate in collaborative professional development actively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Examination of Teacher Candidates’ Lifelong Learning Competence and Basic Motivation Resources as Parts of Sustainability
Sustainability 2019, 11(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11010023
Received: 27 July 2018 / Revised: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 14 December 2018 / Published: 20 December 2018
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Abstract
The purpose of this research is to determine the level of teacher candidates’ lifelong learning competence and basic motivation resources and to examine the lifelong learning competence and basic motivation of teacher candidates in terms of some variables (gender and to be a [...] Read more.
The purpose of this research is to determine the level of teacher candidates’ lifelong learning competence and basic motivation resources and to examine the lifelong learning competence and basic motivation of teacher candidates in terms of some variables (gender and to be a university student or not). For this purpose, a quantitative study was designed. The research was conducted with 382 teacher candidates being educated in the pedagogical formation program at Trakya University. In this research, “Key Competences for Lifelong Learning Scale” and “Basic Motivation Resources Scale” were used as tools for measurement. As a result of the analyses, it was determined that the basic motivation resources of teacher candidates in all of the dimensions of the scale and lifelong learning competence of teacher candidates except from “communicative competence at a foreign language/s” sub-dimension of the scale are above average. In terms of gender variables, significant difference was found in the “communicative competence at a foreign language/s” sub-dimension of “Key Competences for Lifelong Learning Scale” in favor of male teacher candidates and, on the other hand, significant differences were found in the “the competence of learning to learn” and “the competence of cultural awareness and expression” sub-dimension of “Key Competences for Lifelong Learning Scale” in favor of female teacher candidates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
Open AccessArticle
The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Level of the Undergraduate Students of Midwife and Nurse in Terms of Sustainability in Nursing and Midwifery Education
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3574; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103574
Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 19 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 7 October 2018
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Abstract
Self-directed learning is a necessary skill for students and workers to remain lifelong learners. Being self-directed in learning allows nurses to stay elastic, open to change and sustain their, professional development. The aim of this study was to determine the level of self-directed [...] Read more.
Self-directed learning is a necessary skill for students and workers to remain lifelong learners. Being self-directed in learning allows nurses to stay elastic, open to change and sustain their, professional development. The aim of this study was to determine the level of self-directed learning readiness of undergraduate students of nursing and midwifery. This study also investigated whether there were associations between the level of self-directed learning readiness and selected demographic variables such as gender, department, academic level and monthly income in the undergraduate students. Quantitative research method was used in this research. A total of 398 students participated in this survey conducted at the Faculty of Health Sciences of University of Amasya. The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS) that was developed by Fisher et al., was used. In the data analysis, descriptive statistics, Kruskal Wallis H test and Mann Whitney U test were applied. In this study, it was revealed that nursing and midwifery students had relatively high self-directed learning readiness. However, students received the lowest score for the self-management dimension, which indicates that students need support in self-management skills. As a result of the Mann Whitney U test, it was put forward that there were statistically significant differences in level of self-directed learning readiness based on gender and department. As a result of the Kruskal Wallis H test, it was found that there was no difference in level of self-directed learning readiness based on monthly income variable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
Open AccessArticle
Role of Healthy Work Environments in Sustainability of Goal Achievement; Ethical Leadership, Intention to Sabotage, and Psychological Capital in Jordanian Universities
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3559; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103559
Received: 10 September 2018 / Revised: 28 September 2018 / Accepted: 1 October 2018 / Published: 4 October 2018
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Abstract
(1) Background: Long-term competitiveness and sustainability of goal achievement are constantly being sought out by organizations. This study examined the link between ethical leadership, intention to sabotage, and psychological capital in Jordanian universities and how they provide a healthy environment conducive to goal [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Long-term competitiveness and sustainability of goal achievement are constantly being sought out by organizations. This study examined the link between ethical leadership, intention to sabotage, and psychological capital in Jordanian universities and how they provide a healthy environment conducive to goal achievement sustainability. The literature indicated gaps in knowledge regarding the correlation between these variables in non-western countries, which this study intends to fill. The study drew from social learning theory and self-control theory. (2) Methods: Data was obtained by collecting survey questionnaires from a sample of 376 employees in different universities in the north of Jordan, and was analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and Structural Equation Modeling. (3) Results: A significant and direct negative relationship was found between both ethical leadership and psychological capital on employees’ intention to sabotage. Also, a significant and direct positive effect was found between ethical leadership and psychological capital. Furthermore, it was found that psychological capital mediated the relationship between ethical leadership and employees’ intention to sabotage. (4) Conclusions: Leaders have a critical role in increasing employee psychological capital and decreasing intention to sabotage. Many implications indicated by the study’s findings, both theoretical and practical, were discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
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Open AccessArticle
The Sustainability of Teaching Personification in Language Education: A Qualitative Analysis Using Kwang-Chung Yu’s Free Verse
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3517; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103517
Received: 12 August 2018 / Revised: 23 September 2018 / Accepted: 26 September 2018 / Published: 30 September 2018
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Abstract
Many scholars consider Kwang-Chung Yu (1928–2017) a prominent practitioner of free verse. The poetic quality of his work shows considerable ingenuity, and a key feature is his use of personification to create a humorous style. Collection of Humorous Free Verses by Kwang-Chung Yu [...] Read more.
Many scholars consider Kwang-Chung Yu (1928–2017) a prominent practitioner of free verse. The poetic quality of his work shows considerable ingenuity, and a key feature is his use of personification to create a humorous style. Collection of Humorous Free Verses by Kwang-Chung Yu contains the most representative examples of his work. As there are no existing studies on how Yu’s personification technique could be used for language education, the present study takes a qualitative approach to explore this topic. Of the verses featured in the collection, 88% of them use personification, and 102 personified themes were found overall. The discussion consists of four parts that serve as references for language education: (1) an analysis of examples representing the six categories of personified themes, (2) eight major reflection shortcuts for personification; (3) the association and application of eight types of situations for personification; and (4) a review of an online questionnaire and its positive results. The concluding section summarises Yu’s use of personification and presents a comprehensive model of personification for language education based on a pragmatic analysis. This model is a study of a master poet and is sure to be of interest to anyone who wants to know how personification techniques are crafted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Supporting Theoretical Courses through Application
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3439; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103439
Received: 14 August 2018 / Revised: 17 September 2018 / Accepted: 26 September 2018 / Published: 27 September 2018
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Abstract
Ecological crises have affected the architecture discipline, and different techniques, technologies, and design approaches have flourished. A theory about the effect of ecology on architectural design, formulated as ecological design, and its education has started in institutes. However, it is important that the [...] Read more.
Ecological crises have affected the architecture discipline, and different techniques, technologies, and design approaches have flourished. A theory about the effect of ecology on architectural design, formulated as ecological design, and its education has started in institutes. However, it is important that the practice of architecture is reflected through theoretical knowledge in its outputs, and the discipline is conscious about its theoretical knowledge when designing a building, including how much can be understood in the concrete project. This study tries to discern the role of theoretical knowledge in practice and in final projects in the context of ecological design by estimating masters students’ experiences, perceptions, and attitudes. The research method of this study is a qualitative approach, and in-depth interviews have been done with masters-level students. The results of this study showed that the theoretical knowledge given in the lectures could change the opinions of a designer regarding ecological design. Based on the results, ecological design courses can increase the popularity of ecological building design strategies, which offers potential for more sustainable living environments and more environmentally friendly buildings, and their spread into human environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
Open AccessArticle
Relationships between Student Personality Traits, Mobbing, and Depression within the Context of Sustainable Tourism Education: The Case of a Faculty of Tourism
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3418; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103418
Received: 27 July 2018 / Revised: 6 September 2018 / Accepted: 16 September 2018 / Published: 25 September 2018
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Abstract
Sustainable education has the target of improving skills that encourage students or life-long learners to reflect on actions realized by themselves. Its main concern is considering their actual and future cultural, socio-economic, and environmental impacts. Such a paradigm to evaluate these impacts is [...] Read more.
Sustainable education has the target of improving skills that encourage students or life-long learners to reflect on actions realized by themselves. Its main concern is considering their actual and future cultural, socio-economic, and environmental impacts. Such a paradigm to evaluate these impacts is to bring about a local and a global perspective. Sustainability, as a means of qualified education, is a consequence of lifelong learning philosophy. All levels and all kinds of education should deal with the issues of sustainability and create holistic and transformational skills in this topic. In this context, pedagogy and learning environment is of great importance. Concerning learning environment, mobbing cases have frequently coincided in educational organizations. Mobbing has been regarded as an important business disease of contemporary work-life. Besides, mobbing might be coincided not only in the businesses but also in the organizations providing educational services. In schools and universities, mobbing leads to physiological, sociological, and psychological harms for the students. Recent studies have shown that in the school environment, students are exposed to a possible mobbing behavior and that their academic performance and achievement, as well as their mental and physical health, are negatively influenced. In addition, many academic studies indicate that the personality traits students have are an important predictor of exposure to mobbing and depression. This study aimed to determine the levels of mobbing and depression perceptions of students (type A, type B) who are studying tourism education at undergraduate level. In this context, within the groups of personality traits, the levels of depression in the process of mobbing were examined. Research data were collected from 524 students surveyed in a tourism faculty of a state university. In order to realize the data collection, Personality Traits, Mobbing, and Depression scales were used. Correlation, t-test, and regression analysis were performed as well as descriptive statistics (frequencies, mean, and standard deviation) in the process of data analysis. As a consequence of the research, it was determined that mobbing influenced psychological conditions of all students showing the features of A and B type as personality traits. Nevertheless, mobbing and depression perceptions differ upon their personality groups. It was found that the mean scores of mobbing and depression perceptions of students’ having A type personality traits were comparatively higher than the ones having B type personality traits. In addition, it has been revealed that there is a positive relationship between mobbing and depression perceptions of students. Mobbing explained 14% of the change in the depression levels of the students. As a result of the findings, it was determined that personality trait is an important and significant factor in the impact levels of students from mobbing and depression. Incorporation of personality traits into the transformational learning process in the education system as well as teaching and supporting of students with applied social education can be an effective element of sustainable education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Critical Thinking Development—A Necessary Step in Higher Education Transformation towards Sustainability
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3366; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103366
Received: 9 August 2018 / Revised: 12 September 2018 / Accepted: 16 September 2018 / Published: 20 September 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (391 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Education for sustainable development has been addressed by professionals, authorities, and a number of research studies in the last decades, and yet the results are not clearly visible. Teachers as agents of a new mindset do not seem to understand the ways of [...] Read more.
Education for sustainable development has been addressed by professionals, authorities, and a number of research studies in the last decades, and yet the results are not clearly visible. Teachers as agents of a new mindset do not seem to understand the ways of approaching raising awareness of the issues of global challenges. This study investigated the possibility of raising the extent of applying critical thinking to the problem-solving issues of a group of student teachers in their initial training. The sample consisted of 48 student teachers. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used: namely, a questionnaire, content analysis, and focus group interviews. An archive of the students’ materials was also used for content analysis. In the data analysis, inter-rater reliability, as well as parametric (t-test) and non-parametric tests (Mann–Whitney U test) were applied. The results of the study provide evidence of the positive impact of the use of case studies in teaching pre-service teachers on the development of their critical thinking skills. It can be concluded that it should not be taken for granted that teachers automatically know how to develop the competencies that are necessary for sustainable development (SD). Instead, teacher education institutions need to incorporate thorough training that focusses on education for sustainable development (ESD) into the entire teacher programme in order to make sure that the teachers leave their initial training well prepared for guaranteeing Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
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Open AccessArticle
Observation of the Effect of Gender on Children’s Concept of Motion; Sustainability Issue
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3076; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093076
Received: 31 July 2018 / Revised: 21 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 29 August 2018
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Abstract
Determination of the parameters of motion of the surrounding objects, and in particular their speed, is one of the basic skills of a human being. Studies on the development of basic concepts of motion have been carried out for years, exploiting various methods [...] Read more.
Determination of the parameters of motion of the surrounding objects, and in particular their speed, is one of the basic skills of a human being. Studies on the development of basic concepts of motion have been carried out for years, exploiting various methods and in different contexts. In our research, we analyzed the effect of school education on the understanding of the phenomenon of motion. We tried to determine its possible short- and long-term cognitive consequences. To achieve this goal, we used the survey method. Our studies show that children differentiate two specific concepts: average speed and instantaneous velocity. In the present work we present how the gender context is superimposed on the general picture. We found that the initial, genuine pre-school concept of speed is different for girls and boys. Our analysis shows also that this gender effect vanishes quickly along with the introduction of physical definitions of kinematical quantities by physics/science curricula. We discuss the methodological aspect of the statistical gender gap measure and we calculate the gender effect chance probability, p-value, to be slightly less than 0.001. The importance of the observed effect for the sustainable science teaching processes is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
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Open AccessArticle
The Mediating Role of Perception in the Relationship between Expectation and Satisfaction in Terms of Sustainability in Tourism Education
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2253; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072253
Received: 24 May 2018 / Revised: 20 June 2018 / Accepted: 20 June 2018 / Published: 29 June 2018
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Abstract
Education plays a central role in shaping individual and social change toward sustainability. Sustainable tourism education provided by the higher education institutions which offer education at the undergraduate level has an important role in training candidate managers and meeting the need for qualified [...] Read more.
Education plays a central role in shaping individual and social change toward sustainability. Sustainable tourism education provided by the higher education institutions which offer education at the undergraduate level has an important role in training candidate managers and meeting the need for qualified labor in the tourism sector in terms of sustainable tourism. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship among expectation, perception, and satisfaction of the undergraduate students receiving tourism education at the tertiary level. It is also aimed to reveal the mediating role of perception between expectation and satisfaction. One of the quantitative methods used in the research process was the causative and correlational model. A total of 675 students participated in this survey conducted at the Tourism Faculty of Akdeniz University. To collect data, expectation of tourism education, perception of tourism education, and satisfaction of academic education scales were used. In the data analysis, parametric tests, t-test, ANOVA, correlation, and regression analyses were applied. In this study, it was revealed that 675 students receiving tourism education at the undergraduate level came to school with moderate-level expectations, their perceptions fulfilled their expectations with the experience they had, and their satisfaction levels that emerged as a result of their perceptions were at a moderate level as well. As a result of the t-test performed, it was put forward that there was no difference in their level of satisfaction based on the gender variable; however, a significant difference was determined based on the high school type from which a subject graduated, the current department, class, and age variables. As a result of the correlation analysis, a positive relation was identified between the expectation, perception, and satisfaction variables. The multiple regression analysis indicated that expectation positively affected perception and satisfaction; therewithal, perception affected satisfaction and its sub-dimensions positively. It was also found that the perception had a partial mediating role between expectation and satisfaction in education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Leadership and Education)
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