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Special Issue "Law and Sustainability in Global Value Chains"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Katerina Mitkidis

Department of Law, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
Website | E-Mail
Interests: using private law tools to promote public interests; environmental (climate) law; regulation of sustainability; private actors as global regulators
Guest Editor
Dr. Jaakko Salminen

Faculty of Law, University of Turku, Turku, Finland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: contract law; dispute resolution (in particular mediation and arbitration) and contract networks

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue includes selected studies that examine the question of how can we achieve sustainability within global value chains with the help of legal tools. It gathers articles contributing to our understanding of the interaction of law and global value chains, due diligence regulation and the role of contracts and contract law in this area. These three themes are in the focus of the international symposium 'Law and sustainability in global value chains: Due diligence and contracts in focus’ to be held at Aarhus University, in April, 2018. The Special Issue presents contributions from the above-mentioned symposium as well as it invites other submissions, which investigate the role of law in global value chains aiming to secure a sound social foundation for people everywhere now and in the future while staying within planetary boundaries.

Dr. Katerina Mitkidis
Dr. Jaakko Salminen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • global value chains
  • regulation
  • risk based due diligence
  • contractual governance
  • sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle How Blockchain Can Shape Sustainable Global Value Chains: An Evidence, Verifiability, and Enforceability (EVE) Framework
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3926; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113926
Received: 30 September 2018 / Revised: 18 October 2018 / Accepted: 24 October 2018 / Published: 29 October 2018
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Abstract
Law, regulation, and private standards have evolved to enhance sustainability in value chains. However, the volume of hard and soft laws has created complexity and fragmentation for consumers and firms. In addition, global value chains are increasingly disaggregated, making it difficult for consumers
[...] Read more.
Law, regulation, and private standards have evolved to enhance sustainability in value chains. However, the volume of hard and soft laws has created complexity and fragmentation for consumers and firms. In addition, global value chains are increasingly disaggregated, making it difficult for consumers to enforce breaches of sustainability representations. Blockchain, as an immutable and digital record keeping system, is a tool that can deal with this growing complexity in global value chains. Documents verifying sustainability that were once in the private domain and stored in paper copy can now be made accessible in a secure and transparent blockchain platform. Despite a growing interest in the potential of blockchain to transform businesses, there are few concrete examples or scholarly literature showing how blockchain is operationalized in practice. Using a “conceptual framework analysis” approach, we develop an Evidence, Verifiability, and Enforceability (EVE) framework to illustrate how blockchain can enhance sustainability by providing information to consumers on the origin of products, assurances as to the veracity of the information, and a mechanism to enforce representations through the blockchain smart contract function. However, there need to be safeguards put in place for blockchain technology to meet its promise and we discuss some of these challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Law and Sustainability in Global Value Chains)
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Open AccessArticle Implementation of Integrated Project Delivery in Quebec’s Procurement for Public Infrastructure: A Comparative and Relational Perspective
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2648; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082648
Received: 21 June 2018 / Revised: 12 July 2018 / Accepted: 26 July 2018 / Published: 27 July 2018
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Abstract
Province of Quebec (Canada) is in the process of implementing integrated project delivery (IPD) in its procurement process for public infrastructure to more effectively and efficiently achieve functional, environmental, and economic objectives. This paper analyzes the procurement legislation, regulations, and context of three
[...] Read more.
Province of Quebec (Canada) is in the process of implementing integrated project delivery (IPD) in its procurement process for public infrastructure to more effectively and efficiently achieve functional, environmental, and economic objectives. This paper analyzes the procurement legislation, regulations, and context of three jurisdictions through a comparative law approach and under the light of Macneil’s relational contract theory. It is found that Quebec’s procurement process has transactional features that should be counterbalanced, in the context of IPD implementation, by focusing on relational values, whether at the macro or personal level. These relational mechanisms should help legislators and public bodies establishing and operationalizing a viable and relational context of professional services and construction works procurement for IPD projects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Law and Sustainability in Global Value Chains)
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