Special Issue "Green Technology Innovation for Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Dora Marinova
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Curtin University Sustainability Policy (CUSP) Institute, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
Tel. +61 402 780 710 or +61 8 9266 9033
Interests: low-carbon economy; plant-based foods; renewable energy; sustainability policy; sustainable settlements; innovation; innovation systems; sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Innovations have been the building blocks of successful economic performance since industrialisation. Faced with the new sustainability priorities, we expect innovation to continue to represent people’s creativity, ingenuity, and entrepreneurship, but also the broader societal and environmental considerations in transitioning to more sustainable ways of living. This Special Issue calls for submissions related to new green (i.e., environmental or low-carbon) technologies that help improve transportation, energy supply and demand, buildings and construction processes, industrial processes and goods, agricultural processes and food production, rehabilitation of contaminated sites, reforestation, water provision and treatment, sanitation, pollution reduction, or any other aspects of human activities. Interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches are particularly encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Dora Marinova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Technological systems of innovation
  • National systems of innovation
  • Sustainability
  • Environmental technology
  • Green technology
  • Transitioning to sustainability
  • Low-carbon technologies
  • Renewable energy
  • Sustainable transportation
  • Sustainable food production
  • Sustainable agriculture
  • Rehabilitation technologies
  • Technological innovation
  • Sustainable materials
  • Water efficiency

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Framework to Predict Consumption Sustainability Levels of Individuals
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1423; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041423 (registering DOI) - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Innovative Information Systems services have the potential to promote more sustainable behavior. For these so-called Green Information Systems (Green IS) to work well, they should be tailored to individual behavior and attitudes. Although various theoretical models already exist, there is currently no technological [...] Read more.
Innovative Information Systems services have the potential to promote more sustainable behavior. For these so-called Green Information Systems (Green IS) to work well, they should be tailored to individual behavior and attitudes. Although various theoretical models already exist, there is currently no technological solution that automatically estimates individual’s current sustainability levels related to their consumption behaviors in various consumption domains (e.g., mobility and housing). The paper aims at addressing this gap and presents the design of GREENPREDICT, a framework that enables to predict these levels based on multiple features, such as demographic, socio-economic, psychological, and factual knowledge about energy information. To do so, the paper presents and evaluates six different classifiers to predict acts of consumption on the Swiss Household Energy Demand Survey (SHEDS) dataset containing survey answers of 2000 representative individuals living in Switzerland. The results highlight that the ensemble prediction models (i.e., random forests and gradient boosting trees) and the multinomial logistic regression model are the most accurate for the mobility and housing prediction tasks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Technology Innovation for Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
China’s Agricultural Irrigation and Water Conservancy Projects: A Policy Synthesis and Discussion of Emerging Issues
Sustainability 2019, 11(24), 7027; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11247027 - 09 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The United Nations (UN) has identified 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to tackle major barriers to sustainable development by 2030. Achieving these goals will rely on the contribution of all nations and require balancing trade-offs among different sectors. Water and food insecurity have [...] Read more.
The United Nations (UN) has identified 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to tackle major barriers to sustainable development by 2030. Achieving these goals will rely on the contribution of all nations and require balancing trade-offs among different sectors. Water and food insecurity have long been the two major challenges facing China. To address these challenges and achieve the SDGs, China needs to safeguard its agricultural irrigation and water conservancy projects. Although China is making efforts to transition its agricultural development to a sustainable trajectory by promoting water-saving irrigation, a number of issues are emerging, both with policy reforms and technological innovations. Through synthesizing the historical development of agriculture and its relationship with policy and political regimes, this paper identifies four major issues that are challenging the sustainability transformation of China’s agricultural irrigation system and water conservancy projects: (1) problems with financial policy coordination between central and local governments; (2) the lack of incentives for farmers to construct and maintain irrigation infrastructure; (3) conflicts between decentralized operation of land and benefits from shared irrigation infrastructure; and (4) deterioration of small-scale irrigation infrastructure calls for action. In addressing these challenges, policy changes are required: government financial accountability at all levels needs to be clarified; subsidies need to be raised for the construction and management of small-scale irrigation and water conservancy projects; local non-profit organizations need to be established to enhance co-management between farmers and government. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Technology Innovation for Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
How Does Regional Innovation Capacity Affect the Green Growth Performance? Empirical Evidence from China
Sustainability 2019, 11(18), 5084; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11185084 - 17 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Behind the high development of technology, backward institution systems and imperfect incentive mechanisms are not conducive to the green transformation of the economic society in China. Meanwhile, the relative effectiveness of both technical and institution innovation in encouraging green growth has yet to [...] Read more.
Behind the high development of technology, backward institution systems and imperfect incentive mechanisms are not conducive to the green transformation of the economic society in China. Meanwhile, the relative effectiveness of both technical and institution innovation in encouraging green growth has yet to be tested empirically in China. It is of great practical significance to assess the effect of regional innovation capacity (RIC) on the green growth performance. This paper firstly exploits a model to measure regional innovation capacity from the perspective of technological and institutional respect. The panel data of 30 provinces in China during 2008–2017 is then used to examine the coordination effect of technological and institutional instruments on green growth performance. The empirical results demonstrate the following: (i) regional innovation capacity significantly affects the green growth performance of 30 provinces in China, showing regional differences. The elasticity of RIC on the green total factor efficiency in the eastern region is larger at approximately 0.48, followed by central and western areas, at about 0.47 and 0.45, respectively; (ii) technological innovation is able to incentivize green growth performance for all regions in China, while the institutional innovation induces green growth in the eastern region only; (iii) the coordination of technical and institutional instruments has a significant effect on green growth performance, positive in the eastern region and negative in central region respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Technology Innovation for Sustainability)
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