Special Issue "Corporealities of Care Research, Policy and Knowledge"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 February 2022) | Viewed by 3033

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Katie Aubrecht
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sociology, St. Francis Xavier University, 4130 University Avenue, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5, Canada
Interests: intersectional disability studies; aging and disability; dementia; person-centred care: long-term care; marginality and mental health; university student mental health and illness; university culture; health equity; health services and social policy; social determinants of health; critical social theory; community-based research; arts-informed research and pedagogies; postcolonial studies; decolonizing methodologies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Societies invites original research on arts-based and informed approaches in intersectional care research, policy analysis and critical scholarship in the social sciences.

The aim of this Special Issue is to advance knowledge on the corporealities of care research, policy and knowledge. Papers are especially welcome that examine the appearance and use of creative and intersectional approaches in care research in relation to disability justice culture.

In Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (2018) describes disability justice culture as “simultaneously beautiful and practical”, while also noting that, “When we do disability justice work, it becomes impossible to look at disability and not examine how colonialism created it.” The ways care appears, is acknowledged, desired, done and undone are inextricably entangled with/in colonial histories and cartographies.

Recognizing this, submissions are encouraged that consider: the art of care/care of art in a postcolonial praxis of resistance; the aesthetics of (anti)ableist and (in)equitable care; the poetics of episodic or “long-term care”; art-making and techniques of care/techniques of justice; artistic expression and/as embodied care knowledge; examples of creativity and intersectionality in care policy and practice in the Global North and Global South.

Dr. Katie Aubrecht
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as conceptual papers are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • care research
  • policy
  • knowledge
  • corporealities
  • disability
  • disability justice culture

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
How Does a Foucauldian Genealogical Approach Enhance the Study of Long-Term Care through a Critical Disability Lens?
Societies 2022, 12(3), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc12030073 - 28 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Younger disabled adults in long-term care, particularly those with physical disabilities and chronic illnesses, receive care that does not fit their needs. This article looks at whether a Foucauldian genealogical approach would enhance a study that focuses on the societal values that have [...] Read more.
Younger disabled adults in long-term care, particularly those with physical disabilities and chronic illnesses, receive care that does not fit their needs. This article looks at whether a Foucauldian genealogical approach would enhance a study that focuses on the societal values that have allowed this situation to persist. It looks at the historical and cultural contingencies of genealogy, and its ability to explore the complex power relations at play, in normalization and biopower. It concludes that there is a place for this approach–one that can be adapted from the 1970s approach of Foucault to fit power dynamics and positioning in care in the 2020s. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corporealities of Care Research, Policy and Knowledge)

Other

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Concept Paper
Changing Care: Applying the Transtheoretical Model of Change to Embed Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Long-Term Care Research in Canada
Societies 2022, 12(3), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc12030087 - 31 May 2022
Viewed by 567
Abstract
Healthcare policy reform is evident when considering the past, present and future of long-term care (LTC) in Canada. Some of the most pressing issues facing the LTC sector include the changing demographic composition in Canadian LTC homes, minimal consideration for the role of [...] Read more.
Healthcare policy reform is evident when considering the past, present and future of long-term care (LTC) in Canada. Some of the most pressing issues facing the LTC sector include the changing demographic composition in Canadian LTC homes, minimal consideration for the role of intersectionality in LTC data collection and analysis, and the expanding need to engage diverse participants and knowledge users. Using the Transtheoretical Model of Change (TTMC) as a framework, we consider opportunities to address intersectionality in LTC research. Engaging diverse knowledge users in LTC (e.g., unpaid caregivers, paid care staff), community (e.g., advocacy groups, service providers) and policy decision-makers (e.g., provincial government) is crucial. Empowering individuals to participate, modifying environments to support engagement, and facilitating ongoing partnerships with knowledge users are critical aspects of change efforts. Addressing structural barriers (e.g., accessibility, capacity, jurisdictional policies, and mandates) to research in LTC is also essential. The TTMC offers a framework for planning and enacting individual, organizational, and system-level changes for the future of LTC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corporealities of Care Research, Policy and Knowledge)
Concept Paper
The Problems with Care: A Feminist Care Scholar Retrospective
Societies 2022, 12(2), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc12020052 - 16 Mar 2022
Viewed by 862
Abstract
Seeking to support qualitative researchers in the artful development of feminist care scholarship, our goal here is to ‘look back’ on how we have conceptualized the problems of care and developed research that illuminates the social organization of care in distinct ways. As [...] Read more.
Seeking to support qualitative researchers in the artful development of feminist care scholarship, our goal here is to ‘look back’ on how we have conceptualized the problems of care and developed research that illuminates the social organization of care in distinct ways. As part of a ‘feminist care scholar retrospective’, we present five condensed ‘reverse research proposals’, which are retrospective accounts of past research or scholarly activity. From there, we discuss how each project begins with a particular problematic for investigation and a particular conception of care (e.g., as practices, as work, as a concept) to illuminate facets of the social organization of care shaping paid and unpaid care work and its interpretations. These approaches reveal multiple and overlapping ways that care is embodied, understood and organized, as well as ways care can be transformed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corporealities of Care Research, Policy and Knowledge)
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