Special Issue "Public Management and Governance in Smart Cities"

A special issue of Smart Cities (ISSN 2624-6511).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ani Matei
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Public Administration, National University of Political Studies and Public Administration (NUPSPA), Bucharest, Romania
Interests: public economics; evaluation of public performance; extending the European Administrative Space; systemic modeling and analysis; administrative systems; smart administration; smart governance; social innovation in smart cities
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Carmen Savulescu
Website
Guest Editor
National University of Political Studies and Public Administration, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: ICT; public innovation; e-governance; smart governance; social innovation in smart cities; performance management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We find assertions on the concept and accomplishments of the smart city in field research, applications, and literature.
The public debates on this topic are developing and several metropolises are designing their own strategies in view to become smart cities.
The European Union as well as other international bodies and organizations are involved in and strategically manage these debates. Based on national strategies, the development of smart cities has become the main objective of several public policies with outcomes compatible with the development directions.
The smart city represents an urban area creating excellent sustainable development and high life quality as an outcome of powerful human capital, social capital, and IT infrastructure, using digital technologies for enhancing living standards, reducing the cost of living, and realising improved communication with citizens.
The concept of the smart city is complex, integrator, dynamic, and continuously expanding and current activities are focused more on the optimization of its functions.
Even the content of management and public governance being applied to smart cities is changing to incorporating “smart” characteristics.
The digital era contemporary with the fourth industrial revolution determines new processes and profound changes in public management and governance, and the current Special Issue will focus on these changes.

Prof. Dr. Ani Matei
Dr. Carmen Savulescu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Smart Cities is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Smart administration
  • public and corporate governance 2.0
  • human capital in smart cities
  • transparency and decision in smart cities
  • networks of smart cities
  • smart governance
  • social innovation in smart cities

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Understanding the What, Why, and How of Becoming a Smart City: Experiences from Kakinada and Kanpur
Smart Cities 2020, 3(2), 232-247; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities3020014 - 21 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Rapid urbanization can result in challenges, such as overcrowding, congestion, and a lack of urban services. To address these challenges, an increasing number of communities are exploring the concept of a smart city (SC). Although rapid urbanization is a problem for cities around [...] Read more.
Rapid urbanization can result in challenges, such as overcrowding, congestion, and a lack of urban services. To address these challenges, an increasing number of communities are exploring the concept of a smart city (SC). Although rapid urbanization is a problem for cities around the world, its consequences can be severe for those located in developing nations. While previous studies have focused on SCs that were built from the ground up, there is a critical need for studies that focus on how to advance SC initiatives in developing regions faced with limited land and resources. This study identified two proposed SCs in India—Kakinada and Kanpur—which are currently implementing SC projects to explore their SC transformation. This case study aims to explore how “smartness” is understood in these cities and examines the local conditions shaping SC objectives by studying the existing issues in the cities, the proposed projects, and the perception of SC experts on a) what they understand by “smartness”; b) why cities want to become smart; and c) how they will become smart. The study findings indicate that although the high-level goals of the proposed SCs in India are similar to those of existing SCs in developed nations, the underlying objectives and strategies vary and are shaped by the urbanization challenges facing the Indian cities. This research also highlights the key questions a SC planning effort should address, especially in a developing nation context. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Management and Governance in Smart Cities)
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Open AccessArticle
Smart Cities—A View of Societal Aspects
Smart Cities 2019, 2(4), 538-548; https://doi.org/10.3390/smartcities2040033 - 09 Dec 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Smart city projects are considered real challenges to the development of cities everywhere. The concept itself has many definitions, but a smart city should be defined less based on implemented IT solutions, and more based on optimization of its basic functions using new [...] Read more.
Smart city projects are considered real challenges to the development of cities everywhere. The concept itself has many definitions, but a smart city should be defined less based on implemented IT solutions, and more based on optimization of its basic functions using new technologies. There are societal aspects of smart city implementations, similar to eGovernment early projects, and aspects of the use of digital technology that raise concerns. In most cities, the digital divide is still a problem. Smart city projects are the result of the fourth industrial revolution, but cities still lack a full implementation of solutions derived from previous industrial revolutions. Despite that, cities report a lot of smart city projects. Money still gets spent, as being a smart city is, in many cases, an artificial priority and a fashionable topic. Moreover, non-Internet technologies and their relations to a good smart city solution are also not considered. Digital divide bridging is one requirement for a full implementation of a smart city concept. A review of acceleration and deceleration factors shows the obstacles faced by smart city projects. Rankings of cities based on several smart city criteria are published frequently. Various approaches lead to contradictory rankings. A new set of comprehensive rankings developed by an international organization and based on reputable reports and statistics would be useful. The study is based on several smart city and eGovernment projects in Romania. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Management and Governance in Smart Cities)
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