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Special Issue "Wearable Soft Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Joonbum Bae
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, UNIST (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology), Ulsan 44919, Korea
Interests: wearable soft sensors; soft robotics; human- robot interaction systems, bio-inspired robots

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wearable soft sensors have been actively researched due to their ability to provide accurate measurement of body movement and force with improved wearability. Various materials and manufacturing methods can be used for soft sensors depending on what kind of physical principle is used. Additionally, the design and verification of wearable parts considering the characteristic and purpose of the soft sensors are crucial for wearable soft sensors.

This Special Issue is designed to introduce all types of novel soft sensor research, including manufacturing methods, materials, application to wearable systems, such as virtual reality interfaces, health care systems, motion capture systems, and so on.

Dr. Joonbum Bae
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wearable soft sensor;
  • Stretchable sensor;
  • Flexible sensor;
  • Soft sensor for virtual reality;
  • Soft sensor for health care;
  • Soft sensor for motion capture;
  • Human- robot Interaction;

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Textile-Friendly Interconnection between Wearable Measurement Instrumentation and Sensorized Garments—Initial Performance Evaluation for Electrocardiogram Recordings
Sensors 2019, 19(20), 4426; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19204426 - 12 Oct 2019
Abstract
The interconnection between hard electronics and soft textiles remains a noteworthy challenge in regard to the mass production of textile–electronic integrated products such as sensorized garments. The current solutions for this challenge usually have problems with size, flexibility, cost, or complexity of assembly. [...] Read more.
The interconnection between hard electronics and soft textiles remains a noteworthy challenge in regard to the mass production of textile–electronic integrated products such as sensorized garments. The current solutions for this challenge usually have problems with size, flexibility, cost, or complexity of assembly. In this paper, we present a solution with a stretchable and conductive carbon nanotube (CNT)-based paste for screen printing on a textile substrate to produce interconnectors between electronic instrumentation and a sensorized garment. The prototype connectors were evaluated via electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings using a sensorized textile with integrated textile electrodes. The ECG recordings obtained using the connectors were evaluated for signal quality and heart rate detection performance in comparison to ECG recordings obtained with standard pre-gelled Ag/AgCl electrodes and direct cable connection to the ECG amplifier. The results suggest that the ECG recordings obtained with the CNT paste connector are of equivalent quality to those recorded using a silver paste connector or a direct cable and are suitable for the purpose of heart rate detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Soft Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Low-Cost and Highly Sensitive Wearable Sensor Based on Napkin for Health Monitoring
Sensors 2019, 19(15), 3427; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19153427 - 05 Aug 2019
Abstract
The development of sensors with high sensitivity, good flexibility, low cost, and capability of detecting multiple inputs is of great significance for wearable electronics. Herein, we report a napkin-based wearable capacitive sensor fabricated by a novel, low-cost, and facile strategy. The capacitive sensor [...] Read more.
The development of sensors with high sensitivity, good flexibility, low cost, and capability of detecting multiple inputs is of great significance for wearable electronics. Herein, we report a napkin-based wearable capacitive sensor fabricated by a novel, low-cost, and facile strategy. The capacitive sensor is composed of two pieces of electrode plates manufactured by spontaneous assembly of silver nanowires (NWs) on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-patterned napkin. The sensor possesses high sensitivity (>7.492 kPa−1), low cost, and capability for simultaneous detection of multiple signals. We demonstrate that the capacitive sensor can be applied to identify a variety of human physiological signals, including finger motions, eye blinking, and minute wrist pulse. More interestingly, the capacitive sensor comfortably attached to the temple can simultaneously monitor eye blinking and blood pulse. The demonstrated sensor shows great prospects in the applications of human–machine interface, prosthetics, home-based healthcare, and flexible touch panels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Soft Sensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Recent Progress in Wireless Sensors for Wearable Electronics
Sensors 2019, 19(20), 4353; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19204353 - 09 Oct 2019
Abstract
The development of wearable electronics has emphasized user-comfort, convenience, security, and improved medical functionality. Several previous research studies transformed various types of sensors into a wearable form to more closely monitor body signals and enable real-time, continuous sensing. In order to realize these [...] Read more.
The development of wearable electronics has emphasized user-comfort, convenience, security, and improved medical functionality. Several previous research studies transformed various types of sensors into a wearable form to more closely monitor body signals and enable real-time, continuous sensing. In order to realize these wearable sensing platforms, it is essential to integrate wireless power supplies and data communication systems with the wearable sensors. This review article discusses recent progress in wireless technologies and various types of wearable sensors. Also, state-of-the-art research related to the application of wearable sensor systems with wireless functionality is discussed, including electronic skin, smart contact lenses, neural interfaces, and retinal prostheses. Current challenges and prospects of wireless sensor systems are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Soft Sensors)
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Open AccessReview
Soft and Deformable Sensors Based on Liquid Metals
Sensors 2019, 19(19), 4250; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19194250 - 30 Sep 2019
Abstract
Liquid metals are one of the most interesting and promising materials due to their electrical, fluidic, and thermophysical properties. With the aid of their exceptional deformable natures, liquid metals are now considered to be electrically conductive materials for sensors and actuators, major constituent [...] Read more.
Liquid metals are one of the most interesting and promising materials due to their electrical, fluidic, and thermophysical properties. With the aid of their exceptional deformable natures, liquid metals are now considered to be electrically conductive materials for sensors and actuators, major constituent transducers in soft robotics, that can experience and withstand significant levels of mechanical deformation. For the upcoming era of wearable electronics and soft robotics, we would like to offer an up-to-date overview of liquid metal-based soft (thus significantly deformable) sensors mainly but not limited to researchers in relevant fields. This paper will thoroughly highlight and critically review recent literature on design, fabrication, characterization, and application of liquid metal devices and suggest scientific and engineering routes towards liquid metal sensing devices of tomorrow. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Soft Sensors)
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Open AccessReview
Soft and Stretchable Polymeric Optical Waveguide-Based Sensors for Wearable and Biomedical Applications
Sensors 2019, 19(17), 3771; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19173771 - 30 Aug 2019
Abstract
The past decades have witnessed the rapid development in soft, stretchable, and biocompatible devices for applications in biomedical monitoring, personal healthcare, and human–machine interfaces. In particular, the design of soft devices in optics has attracted tremendous interests attributed to their distinct advantages such [...] Read more.
The past decades have witnessed the rapid development in soft, stretchable, and biocompatible devices for applications in biomedical monitoring, personal healthcare, and human–machine interfaces. In particular, the design of soft devices in optics has attracted tremendous interests attributed to their distinct advantages such as inherent electrical safety, high stability in long-term operation, potential to be miniaturized, and free of electromagnetic interferences. As the alternatives to conventional rigid optical waveguides, considerable efforts have been made to develop light-guiding devices by using various transparent and elastic polymers, which offer desired physiomechanical properties and enable wearable/implantable applications in optical sensing, diagnostics, and therapy. Here, we review recent progress in soft and stretchable optical waveguides and sensors, including advanced structural design, fabrication strategies, and functionalities. Furthermore, the potential applications of those optical devices for various wearable and biomedical applications are discussed. It is expected that the newly emerged soft and stretchable optical technologies will provide a safe and reliable alternative to next-generation, smart wearables and healthcare devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Soft Sensors)
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