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Sensor Solutions towards Climate-Resilient and Sustainable Cities

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Intelligent Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 5795

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Rural and Surveying Engineering, National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), 15780 Zographos, Greece
Interests: engineering surveying; geodesy, positioning and navigation; point-cloud modelling and applications
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Surveying and Geoinformatics Engineering, University of West Attica, 12243 Athens, Greece
Interests: early warning systems; sustainable and resilient cities; management of digital cultural content
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

SENSOR SOLUTIONS TOWARDS CLIMATE-RESILIENT AND SUSTAINABLE CITIES

As our world is covered by uncertainties where social, economic, and environmental recessions can occur at any point in time, emerging and geospatial technologies can offer appropriate solutions to minimize risks, prevent damage, and mitigate consequences. Since sustainability and resiliency are exchangeable terms, our cities must adapt to several issues such as climate change, increasing population, maintenance and state of infrastructure, competitiveness as a city, quality of life for residents, and general offerings to visitors and investors. The main challenge is to design intelligent cities under the framework of resilience and sustainability in order to use online knowledge from sensors data streams to providing a much greater level of detail regarding how city systems work and interact and, thus, provide the appropriate ingredients for low-latency decisions.

This Special Issue will examine the state-of-the-art applications and future directions in sensor technology and applications focusing in climate resiliency, sustainability, and well-being scenarios. In addition, it will combine innovative paradigms and technologies, development applications, empirical studies, and future trends in the multidisciplinary field of smart sensing. In situ networks and sensors, unmanned aerial systems, models, and citizen observatories are expected as the main components of submitted contributions. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

- Sensors to increase the resilience of new buildings—cultural monuments and the protection of existing monuments

- Air quality and sound pollution sensing

- Community-based sensing

- Low-cost infrastructure for city sensors

- Energy harvesting and efficiency for sensor solutions

- Real-time analytics of heterogeneous spatiotemporal data for the prediction and detection of unusual patterns

- Early warning systems for natural and anthropogenic disasters

- Urban mobility data management and visualization

- Sensing for well-being applications

- Design tools for determining optimal locations of sensors for urban resilience

- Case studies of successful deployment of sensing solutions for smart and resilient cities

- Ethical issues, security, and privacy in city sensor systems and applications

Prof. Dr. Maria Tsakiri
Dr. George Hloupis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 7953 KiB  
Article
Estimation of Earthquake Early Warning Parameters for Eastern Gulf of Corinth and Western Attica Region (Greece). First Results
by Filippos Vallianatos, Andreas Karakonstantis and Nikolaos Sakelariou
Sensors 2021, 21(15), 5084; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21155084 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2444
Abstract
The main goal of an Earthquake Early Warning System (EEWS) is to alert before the arrival of damaging waves using the first seismic arrival as a proxy, thus becoming an important operational tool for real-time seismic risk management on a short timescale. EEWSs [...] Read more.
The main goal of an Earthquake Early Warning System (EEWS) is to alert before the arrival of damaging waves using the first seismic arrival as a proxy, thus becoming an important operational tool for real-time seismic risk management on a short timescale. EEWSs are based on the use of scaling relations between parameters measured on the initial portion of the seismic signal after the arrival of the first wave. To explore the plausibility of EEWSs around the Eastern Gulf of Corinth and Western Attica, amplitude and frequency-based parameters, such as peak displacement (Pd), the integral of squared velocity (IV 2) and the characteristic period (τc), were analyzed. All parameters were estimated directly from the initial 3 s, 4 s, and 5 s signal windows (tw) after the P arrival. While further study is required on the behavior of the proxy quantities, we propose that the IV 2 parameter and the peak amplitudes of the first seconds of the P waves present significant stability and introduce the possibility of a future on-site EEWS for areas affected by earthquakes located in the Eastern Gulf of Corinth and Western Attica. Parameters related to regional-based EEWS need to be further evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensor Solutions towards Climate-Resilient and Sustainable Cities)
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12 pages, 8045 KiB  
Article
Strong Ground Motion Sensor Network for Civil Protection Rapid Decision Support Systems
by Georgios Chatzopoulos, Ilias Papadopoulos, Filippos Vallianatos, John P. Makris and Maria Kouli
Sensors 2021, 21(8), 2833; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21082833 - 17 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2318
Abstract
Strong motion sensor networks deployed in metropolitan areas are able to provide valuable information for civil protection Decision Support Systems (DSSs) aiming to mitigate seismic risk and earthquake social-economic impact. To this direction, such a network is installed and real-time operated in Chania [...] Read more.
Strong motion sensor networks deployed in metropolitan areas are able to provide valuable information for civil protection Decision Support Systems (DSSs) aiming to mitigate seismic risk and earthquake social-economic impact. To this direction, such a network is installed and real-time operated in Chania (Crete Island, Greece), city located in the vicinity of the seismically active south front of the Hellenic Subduction Zone. A blend of both traditional and advanced analysis techniques and interpretation methods of strong ground motion data are presented, studying indicative cases of Chania shaking due to earthquakes in the last couple years. The orientation independent spectral acceleration as well as the spatial distribution of the strong ground motion parameters such as the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA), Peak Ground Velocity (PGV), Peak Ground Displacement (PGD) and Arias Ιntensity observed at the urban area of Chania are presented with the use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. The results point to the importance of the strong ground motion networks as they can provide valuable information on earthquake hazards prior to and after detrimental seismic events to feed rapid systems supporting civil protection decisions for prevention and emergency response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensor Solutions towards Climate-Resilient and Sustainable Cities)
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