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Special Issue "Printed Electrode Sensors and Biosensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Constantin Apetrei
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, "Dunarea de Jos" University of Galati, Galati 800008, Romania
Interests: sensor; biosensor; multisensory system; e-tongue; nanomaterial; electroactive compound; voltammetry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Sensors entitled “Printed Electrode Sensors and Biosensors” will include original research and review articles in the field of sensors and biosensors based on electrodes developed using printing technology in the main aspects, including the design, materials employed and the molecular architecture, and the fabrication process, as well as their morphological and electrochemical characterization and application in sensing and biosensing. It will highlight the importance of this type of sensor and the advances in the field, as well as applications in the detection of a different kind of bioactive compound. It will offer an opportunity for scientists to publish their novel studies related to sensors based in printing technology.

Prof. Constantin Apetrei
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • screen-printed electrode
  • electroanalysis
  • sensor
  • enzyme
  • carbonaceous material
  • nanomaterial
  • bioactive compound

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Wearable Vibration Sensor for Measuring the Wing Flapping of Insects
Sensors 2021, 21(2), 593; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21020593 - 15 Jan 2021
Viewed by 505
Abstract
In this study, we fabricated a novel wearable vibration sensor for insects and measured their wing flapping. An analysis of insect wing deformation in relation to changes in the environment plays an important role in understanding the underlying mechanism enabling insects to dynamically [...] Read more.
In this study, we fabricated a novel wearable vibration sensor for insects and measured their wing flapping. An analysis of insect wing deformation in relation to changes in the environment plays an important role in understanding the underlying mechanism enabling insects to dynamically interact with their surrounding environment. It is common to use a high-speed camera to measure the wing flapping; however, it is difficult to analyze the feedback mechanism caused by the environmental changes caused by the flapping because this method applies an indirect measurement. Therefore, we propose the fabrication of a novel film sensor that is capable of measuring the changes in the wingbeat frequency of an insect. This novel sensor is composed of flat silver particles admixed with a silicone polymer, which changes the value of the resistor when a bending deformation occurs. As a result of attaching this sensor to the wings of a moth and a dragonfly and measuring the flapping of the wings, we were able to measure the frequency of the flapping with high accuracy. In addition, as a result of simultaneously measuring the relationship between the behavior of a moth during its search for an odor source and its wing flapping, it became clear that the frequency of the flapping changed depending on the frequency of the odor reception. From this result, a wearable film sensor for an insect that can measure the displacement of the body during a particular behavior was fabricated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electrode Sensors and Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Inkjet-Printing of Nanoparticle Gold and Silver Ink on Cyclic Olefin Copolymer for DNA-Sensing Applications
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1333; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051333 - 29 Feb 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1247
Abstract
Inkjet technology as a maskless, direct-writing technology offers the potential for structured deposition of functional materials for the realization of electrodes for, e.g., sensing applications. In this work, electrodes were realized by inkjet-printing of commercial nanoparticle gold ink on planar substrates and, for [...] Read more.
Inkjet technology as a maskless, direct-writing technology offers the potential for structured deposition of functional materials for the realization of electrodes for, e.g., sensing applications. In this work, electrodes were realized by inkjet-printing of commercial nanoparticle gold ink on planar substrates and, for the first time, onto the 2.5D surfaces of a 0.5 mm-deep microfluidic chamber produced in cyclic olefin copolymer (COC). The challenges of a poor wetting behavior and a low process temperature of the COC used were solved by a pretreatment with oxygen plasma and the combination of thermal (130 °C for 1 h) and photonic (955 mJ/cm²) steps for sintering. By performing the photonic curing, the resistance could be reduced by about 50% to 22.7 µΩ cm. The printed gold structures were mechanically stable (optimal cross-cut value) and porous (roughness factors between 8.6 and 24.4 for 3 and 9 inkjet-printed layers, respectively). Thiolated DNA probes were immobilized throughout the porous structure without the necessity of a surface activation step. Hybridization of labeled DNA probes resulted in specific signals comparable to signals on commercial screen-printed electrodes and could be reproduced after regeneration. The process described may facilitate the integration of electrodes in 2.5D lab-on-a-chip systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electrode Sensors and Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle
A Facile Fabrication of a Potentiometric Arrayed Glucose Biosensor Based on Nafion-GOx/GO/AZO
Sensors 2020, 20(4), 964; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20040964 - 11 Feb 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 859
Abstract
In this study, the potentiometric arrayed glucose biosensors, which were based on zinc oxide (ZnO) or aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) sensing membranes, were fabricated by using screen-printing technology and a sputtering system, and graphene oxide (GO) and Nafion-glucose oxidase (GOx) were used to [...] Read more.
In this study, the potentiometric arrayed glucose biosensors, which were based on zinc oxide (ZnO) or aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) sensing membranes, were fabricated by using screen-printing technology and a sputtering system, and graphene oxide (GO) and Nafion-glucose oxidase (GOx) were used to modify sensing membranes by using the drop-coating method. Next, the material properties were characterized by using a Raman spectrometer, a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), and a scanning probe microscope (SPM). The sensing characteristics of the glucose biosensors were measured by using the voltage–time (V-T) measurement system. Finally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was conducted to analyze their charge transfer abilities. The results indicated that the average sensitivity of the glucose biosensor based on Nafion-GOx/GO/AZO was apparently higher than that of the glucose biosensor based on Nafion-GOx/GO/ZnO. In addition, the glucose biosensor based on Nafion-GOx/GO/AZO exhibited an excellent average sensitivity of 15.44 mV/mM and linearity of 0.997 over a narrow range of glucose concentration range, a response time of 26 s, a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.89 mM, and good reproducibility. In terms of the reversibility and stability, the hysteresis voltages (VH) were 3.96 mV and 2.42 mV. Additionally, the glucose biosensor also showed good anti-inference ability and reproducibility. According to these results, it is demonstrated that AZO is a promising material, which could be used to develop a reliable, simple, and low-cost potentiometric glucose biosensor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electrode Sensors and Biosensors)
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Open AccessArticle
A Wearable Textile 3D Gesture Recognition Sensor Based on Screen-Printing Technology
Sensors 2019, 19(23), 5068; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19235068 - 20 Nov 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1052
Abstract
Research has developed various solutions in order for computers to recognize hand gestures in the context of human machine interface (HMI). The design of a successful hand gesture recognition system must address functionality and usability. The gesture recognition market has evolved from touchpads [...] Read more.
Research has developed various solutions in order for computers to recognize hand gestures in the context of human machine interface (HMI). The design of a successful hand gesture recognition system must address functionality and usability. The gesture recognition market has evolved from touchpads to touchless sensors, which do not need direct contact. Their application in textiles ranges from the field of medical environments to smart home applications and the automotive industry. In this paper, a textile capacitive touchless sensor has been developed by using screen-printing technology. Two different designs were developed to obtain the best configuration, obtaining good results in both cases. Finally, as a real application, a complete solution of the sensor with wireless communications is presented to be used as an interface for a mobile phone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electrode Sensors and Biosensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review on Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors Used in Phenylalanine Electroanalysis
Sensors 2020, 20(9), 2496; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20092496 - 28 Apr 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1003
Abstract
Phenylalanine is an amino acid found in breast milk and in many foods, being an essential nutrient. This amino acid is very important for the human body because it is transformed into tyrosine and, subsequently, into catecholamine neurotransmitters. However, there are individuals who [...] Read more.
Phenylalanine is an amino acid found in breast milk and in many foods, being an essential nutrient. This amino acid is very important for the human body because it is transformed into tyrosine and, subsequently, into catecholamine neurotransmitters. However, there are individuals who were born with a genetic disorder called phenylketonuria. The accumulation of phenylalanine and of some metabolites in the body is dangerous and may cause convulsions, brain damage and mental retardation. Determining the concentration of phenylalanine in different biologic fluids is very important because it can provide information about the health status of the individuals envisaged. Since such determinations may be made by using electrochemical sensors and biosensors, numerous researchers have developed such sensors for phenylalanine detection and different sensitive materials were used in order to improve the selectivity, sensitivity and detection limit. The present review aims at presenting the design and performance of some electrochemical bio (sensors) traditionally used for phenylalanine detection as reported in a series of relevant scientific papers published in the last decade. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed Electrode Sensors and Biosensors)
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