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Special Issue "Printed-Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Alberto J. Palma
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Departamento de Electrónica y Tecnología de Computadores, Universidad de Granada—ETSIIT, c/P. Daniel Saucedo Aranda s/n, 18071 Granada, España
Interests: electronic instrumentation; sensors and biosensors, dosimetry with MOSFET; flexible and printed electronics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Luis Fermin Capitan-Vallvey
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Departamento de Química Analítica, Universidad de Granada—Facultad de Ciencias. Campus de Fuentenueva, 18071 Granada, España
Interests: analytical chemistry, chemical sensors, optical sensors, printed sensors, microfluidic devices, validation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The printed sensors market is expected to reach USD 10.46 Billion by 2022, at a compound annual growth rate of 7.0% between 2017 and 2022. The major drivers for the printed sensors market are the growing integration of printed sensors in medical wearable devices, internet-of things (IoT) systems, and smart packaging, as well as the benefits of printed sensors over conventional sensing technology. This trend produces a high demand for sensors that can be integrated on any substrate and fabrication methods like printing technologies that are expanding the field of flexible/bendable/stretchable sensors.

This Special Issue focuses on (bio-)chemical and physical sensors that can be produced on flexible substrates by potentially low-cost technology such as printing or roll-to-roll processing. This number accepts high-quality articles that contain original research results and review articles and will allow readers to learn more about technologies related to the potential of providing printed sensors that will benefit people’s lives.

Therefore, articles reporting recent advances in sensor materials, sensor properties, sensor device concepts, sensor fabrication/printing and testing techniques, printing on novel substrates, and application-oriented printed sensor systems, as well as close related topics, are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Alberto J. Palma
Prof. Dr. Luis Fermin Capitan-Vallvey
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Printed sensors
  • Flexible substrates
  • Printing technology
  • Inkjet printing
  • Screen printing
  • Roll-to-roll technology
  • Wearable devices
  • IoT devices
  • Smart packaging
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Biomedical applications

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Imprinted Polymer-Based Guided Mode Resonance Grating Strain Sensors
Sensors 2020, 20(11), 3221; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113221 - 05 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 927
Abstract
Optical sensors based on guided mode resonance (GMR) realized in polymers are promising candidates for sensitive and cost effective strain sensors. The benefit of GMR grating sensors is the non-contact, easy optical read-out with large working distance, avoiding costly alignment and packaging procedures. [...] Read more.
Optical sensors based on guided mode resonance (GMR) realized in polymers are promising candidates for sensitive and cost effective strain sensors. The benefit of GMR grating sensors is the non-contact, easy optical read-out with large working distance, avoiding costly alignment and packaging procedures. The GMR gratings with resonance around 850–900 nm are fabricated using electron beam lithography and replicated using a soft stamp based imprinting technique on 175 μ m-thick foils to make them suitable for optical strain sensing. For the strain measurements, foils are realized with both GMR gratings and waveguides with Bragg gratings. The latter are used as reference sensors and allow extracting the absolute strain sensitivity of the GMR sensor foils. Following this method, it is shown that GMR gratings have an absolute strain sensitivity of 1.02 ± 0.05 pm / μ ε at 870 nm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed-Sensors)
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Article
Fabrication and Characterization of a Flexible Fluxgate Sensor with Pad-Printed Solenoid Coils
Sensors 2020, 20(8), 2275; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20082275 - 16 Apr 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1000
Abstract
This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a flexible, flat, miniaturized fluxgate sensor with a thin amorphous rectangular magnetic core fabricated by the pad/printing technique. Both the design and the various printing steps of the sensor are presented. The fluxgate sensor comprises [...] Read more.
This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a flexible, flat, miniaturized fluxgate sensor with a thin amorphous rectangular magnetic core fabricated by the pad/printing technique. Both the design and the various printing steps of the sensor are presented. The fluxgate sensor comprises of solenoid coils, and to the best of our knowledge, is the first to be printed with a conventional micro-printing technique. The magnetic core is a non-printed component, placed between the printed layers. The sensor’s linear measuring range is ±40 µT with 2% full-scale linearity error, at 100 kHz excitation frequency. The highest measured sensitivity reaches 14,620 V/T at 200 kHz, while the noise of the sensor was found to be 10 nT/ Hz at 1 Hz. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed-Sensors)
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Review

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Review
Laser-Assisted Printed Flexible Sensors: A Review
Sensors 2019, 19(6), 1462; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19061462 - 25 Mar 2019
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2494
Abstract
This paper provides a substantial review of some of the significant research done on the fabrication and implementation of laser-assisted printed flexible sensors. In recent times, using laser cutting to develop printed flexible sensors has become a popular technique due to advantages such [...] Read more.
This paper provides a substantial review of some of the significant research done on the fabrication and implementation of laser-assisted printed flexible sensors. In recent times, using laser cutting to develop printed flexible sensors has become a popular technique due to advantages such as the low cost of production, easy sample preparation, the ability to process a range of raw materials, and its usability for different functionalities. Different kinds of laser cutters are now available that work on samples very precisely via the available laser parameters. Thus, laser-cutting techniques provide huge scope for the development of prototypes with a varied range of sizes and dimensions. Meanwhile, researchers have been constantly working on the types of materials that can be processed, individually or in conjugation with one another, to form samples for laser-ablation. Some of the laser-printed techniques that are commonly considered for fabricating flexible sensors, which are discussed in this paper, include nanocomposite-based, laser-ablated, and 3D-printing. The developed sensors have been used for a range of applications, such as electrochemical and strain-sensing purposes. The challenges faced by the current printed flexible sensors, along with a market survey, are also outlined in this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed-Sensors)
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Other

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Letter
Cantilever Type Acceleration Sensors Made by Roll-to-Roll Slot-Die Coating
Sensors 2020, 20(13), 3748; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20133748 - 04 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 787
Abstract
This paper presents the fabrication by means of roll-to-roll slot-die coating and characterization of air gap-based cantilever type capacitive acceleration sensors. As the mass of the sensor moves in the opposite direction of the acceleration, a capacitance change occurs. The sensor is designed [...] Read more.
This paper presents the fabrication by means of roll-to-roll slot-die coating and characterization of air gap-based cantilever type capacitive acceleration sensors. As the mass of the sensor moves in the opposite direction of the acceleration, a capacitance change occurs. The sensor is designed to have a six layers structure with an air gap. Fabrication of the air gap and cantilever was enabled by coating and removing water-soluble PVA. The bottom electrode, the dielectric layer, and the sacrificial layer were formed using the roll-to-roll slot-die coating technique. The spacer, the top electrode, and the structural layer were formed by spin coating. Several kinds of experiments were conducted for characterization of the fabricated sensor samples. Experimental results show that accelerations of up to 3.6 g can be sensed with an average sensitivity of 0.00856 %/g. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed-Sensors)
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