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Special Issue "Electromagnetic and Electrical Methods for Environmental Engineering"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jacopo Boaga
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geosciences, Università degli Studi di Padova, 35122 Padua, Italy
Interests: near surface geophysics; surface wave seismic; electrical methods; frequency domain electro-magnetic methods
Dr. Adrian Flores-Orozco
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geodesy and Geoinformation, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna, Austria
Interests: biogeophysics; environmental geophysics; near-surface geophysics; electrical methods; induced polarization; electromagnetic methods
Dr. Matthias Bücker
Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Geophysics and extraterrestrial Physics, TU Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany
Interests: near-surface geophysics; induced polarization; geoelectrical; electromagnetic methods; water-borne geophysics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In geophysics, electrical and electromagnetic methods have demonstrated their potential for environmental engineering investigations. Both galvanically coupled and contactless measuring devices are used for a wide range of environmental applications, such as geohydrological characterization, precision agriculture, brownfield investigations, monitoring of mass movements and land degradation, as well as climate-change-driven processes under extreme conditions. Moreover, innovative technologies such as wireless instruments, permanent monitoring setups, and light airborne survey systems present new perspectives for the use of electromagnetic and electrical methods in the context of environmental engineering applications. This Special Issue aims at providing an overview of recent advances in measuring technologies, with a special focus on case studies demonstrating the potential of electrical and electromagnetic methods applied to environmental problems.

Possible Special Issue topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Electrical resistivity tomography for environmental characterization.
  • Borehole and surface electrical resistivity tomography for the monitoring of polluted sites.
  • Electromagnetic and electrical methods in urban areas.
  • Electromagnetic and electrical methods for precision agriculture.
  • Electrical resistivity tomography for geothermal applications.
  • Airborne electromagnetic methods for environmental applications.
  • Marine electromagnetic and electrical methods.
  • Permanent on-site monitoring systems.
  • Ground penetrating radar for geotechnical applications.
  • Electrical methods for geotechnical soil characterization.
  • Electromagnetic and electrical methods for climate change monitoring.
  • Electromagnetic and electrical methods in arid zones.
  • Electromagnetic and electrical methods for cryosphere investigations.
  • Electromagnetic and electrical methods for the investigation of mass movements and landslides.

Dr. Jacopo Boaga
Dr. Adrian Flores-Orozco
Dr. Matthias Bücker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrical resistivity tomography
  • transient electromagnetics
  • frequency-domain electromagnetics
  • ground penetrating radar
  • induced polarization
  • geophysical monitoring
  • environmental geophysics
  • biogeophysics
  • engineering geophysics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Application of Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor Technology to Leak Detection and Monitoring in Diaphragm Wall Joints: A Field Study
Sensors 2021, 21(2), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21020441 - 09 Jan 2021
Abstract
Joints between diaphragm wall panels are weak spots in wall construction. It is essential that potential leak sites are detected prior to excavation. In this study, a novel leak detection and monitoring system is presented that is based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) [...] Read more.
Joints between diaphragm wall panels are weak spots in wall construction. It is essential that potential leak sites are detected prior to excavation. In this study, a novel leak detection and monitoring system is presented that is based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing technology. A field study was performed in a deep excavation supported by diaphragm walls (in Hohhot, China) to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Two schemes were trialed; one using pipes made of stainless steel, and one used a pipeless method. The results of the field study are presented and discussed. They show that potential leak sites in the wall joints could be determined prior to excavation using the proposed detection method. Stainless steel is a good material to use to make the detection tube because it can protect the FBG sensors and heating belts from damage and is more sensitive to water leakage. The field study provides good evidence for the feasibility of the new detection system. It also provides valuable experience for the field application of the system and has generated useful data to use in follow-up work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electromagnetic and Electrical Methods for Environmental Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Open-Ended Coaxial Probe Measurements of Complex Dielectric Permittivity in Diesel-Contaminated Soil during Bioremediation
Sensors 2020, 20(22), 6677; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20226677 - 22 Nov 2020
Abstract
In the bioremediation field, geophysical techniques are commonly applied, at lab scale and field scale, to perform the characterization and the monitoring of contaminated soils. We propose a method for detecting the dielectric properties of contaminated soil during a process of bioremediation. An [...] Read more.
In the bioremediation field, geophysical techniques are commonly applied, at lab scale and field scale, to perform the characterization and the monitoring of contaminated soils. We propose a method for detecting the dielectric properties of contaminated soil during a process of bioremediation. An open-ended coaxial probe measured the complex dielectric permittivity (between 0.2 and 20 GHz) on a series of six soil microcosms contaminated by diesel oil (13.5% Voil/Vtot). The microcosms had different moisture content (13%, 19%, and 24% Vw/Vtot) and different salinity due to the addition of nutrients (22 and 15 g/L). The real and the imaginary component of the complex dielectric permittivity were evaluated at the initial stage of contamination and after 130 days. In almost all microcosms, the real component showed a significant decrease (up to 2 units) at all frequencies. The results revealed that the changes in the real part of the dielectric permittivity are related to the amount of degradation and loss in moisture content. The imaginary component, mainly linked to the electrical conductivity of the soil, shows a significant drop to almost 0 at low frequencies. This could be explained by a salt depletion during bioremediation. Despite a moderate accuracy reduction compared to measurements performed on liquid media, this technology can be successfully applied to granular materials such as soil. The open-ended coaxial probe is a promising instrument to check the dielectric properties of soil to characterize or monitor a bioremediation process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electromagnetic and Electrical Methods for Environmental Engineering)
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