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Special Issue "Electrochemical Immunosensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Benoît Piro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chemistry Department, University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS, UMR 7086 CNRS 15 rue J-A de Baïf, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France
Interests: bioelectrochemistry; biosensors; bioelectronics; transistor; nanomaterials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Steeve Reisberg
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Chemistry Department, University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS, UMR 7086 CNRS 15 rue J-A de Baïf, 75205 Paris Cedex 13, France
Interests: bioelectrochemistry; biosensors; biofunctionalization; biomarkers; environment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Immunoanalytical methods have seen outstanding growth in recent years, driven in large part by the need for faster, more sensitive, more portable, and easy-to-use systems to detect cancers biomarkers for clinical diagnosis, persistent organics pollutants in environmental and industrial monitoring, or biochemical weapons of terrorism. At the same time, advances in the field of microelectronics, microfabrication, printing, microfluidics or molecular biology, genetic engineering, make today more than ever biosensors attractive for industrial processes and commercial applications. In this field, electrochemical immunosensors offer inherent advantages, among which miniaturization, mass fabrication, low cost and potential decentralized analysis, low power, easy manufacturing, multiplexing, high sensitivity, real time detection, compatibility with advanced semiconductor technology, simplicity, and ease of use.

A current challenge is the development of highly sensitive electrochemical immunosensors, including electrochemical transistors, through the use of micro- and printing technologies. This Special Issue of Sensors will highlight original strategies in terms of biofunctionalization of semiconductors, nanomaterials or supported nanostructures or inks, as well as original transduction mode (using a label or not, with an external reagent or not, etc.), in order to promote the exchange of ideas between scientists and engineers working in this field.

Dr. Benoit Piro
Dr. Steeve Reisberg
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrochemical immunosensors
  • Enzymatic labels
  • Quantum dot-labelled immunosensors
  • Metal nanoparticle-labelled immunosensors
  • Label-free immunosensors
  • nanostructured materials
  • Screen printing, inkjet printing
  • Multiplexed analytical formats
  • Microfabrication and microfluidics
  • Point-of-care devices
  • Environmental devices

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Comparison between a Direct-Flow SPR Immunosensor for Ampicillin and a Competitive Conventional Amperometric Device: Analytical Features and Possible Applications to Real Samples
Sensors 2017, 17(4), 819; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17040819 - 10 Apr 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
In this research, we developed a direct-flow surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor for ampicillin to perform direct, simple, and fast measurements of this important antibiotic. In order to better evaluate the performance, it was compared with a conventional amperometric immunosensor, working with a [...] Read more.
In this research, we developed a direct-flow surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor for ampicillin to perform direct, simple, and fast measurements of this important antibiotic. In order to better evaluate the performance, it was compared with a conventional amperometric immunosensor, working with a competitive format with the aim of finding out experimental real advantages and disadvantages of two respective methods. Results showed that certain analytical features of the new SPR immunodevice, such as the lower limit of detection (LOD) value and the width of the linear range, are poorer than those of a conventional amperometric immunosensor, which adversely affects the application to samples such as natural waters. On the other hand, the SPR immunosensor was more selective to ampicillin, and measurements were more easily and quickly attained compared to those performed with the conventional competitive immunosensor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Immunosensors)
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Open AccessArticle
A Simple Interfacial Platform for Homogeneous Electrochemical Immunoassays Using a Poly(Vinylimidazole)-Modified Electrode
Sensors 2017, 17(1), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17010054 - 29 Dec 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this study, a homogeneous method featuring simple, one-step detection was developed to analyze hippuric acid (HA), a major metabolite of toluene. High sensitivity was achieved with the facile immobilization of poly(vinylimidazole) (PVI) on an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. Using a previously [...] Read more.
In this study, a homogeneous method featuring simple, one-step detection was developed to analyze hippuric acid (HA), a major metabolite of toluene. High sensitivity was achieved with the facile immobilization of poly(vinylimidazole) (PVI) on an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. Using a previously developed approach, pentacyanoferrate was coordinated with pyridyl-N ligands, and the redox-active Fe(II/III) centers were bound to Ni(II) ions on the electrode via electrostatic cyanide bridges. The detection was accomplished by the competitive binding of free HA and pentacyanoferrate-(4-aminomethylpyridine-hippuric acid) (Fe-HA, the electron transfer mediator) to the HA antibody on the Ni(II) ions-modified PVI-ITO (Ni-PVI-ITO) electrode. The electrical and physicochemical characterization of the electrode was carried out by cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At low mediator concentrations, the electrical signals were proportional to the HA concentration between 0.1 µg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL. The same method may be extended to other small organic molecules. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Immunosensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nanomaterials for Electrochemical Immunosensing
Sensors 2017, 17(5), 1041; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17051041 - 05 May 2017
Cited by 13
Abstract
Electrochemical immunosensors resulting from a combination of the traditional immunoassay approach with modern biosensors and electrochemical analysis constitute a current research hotspot. They exhibit both the high selectivity characteristics of immunoassays and the high sensitivity of electrochemical analysis, along with other merits such [...] Read more.
Electrochemical immunosensors resulting from a combination of the traditional immunoassay approach with modern biosensors and electrochemical analysis constitute a current research hotspot. They exhibit both the high selectivity characteristics of immunoassays and the high sensitivity of electrochemical analysis, along with other merits such as small volume, convenience, low cost, simple preparation, and real-time on-line detection, and have been widely used in the fields of environmental monitoring, medical clinical trials and food analysis. Notably, the rapid development of nanotechnology and the wide application of nanomaterials have provided new opportunities for the development of high-performance electrochemical immunosensors. Various nanomaterials with different properties can effectively solve issues such as the immobilization of biological recognition molecules, enrichment and concentration of trace analytes, and signal detection and amplification to further enhance the stability and sensitivity of the electrochemical immunoassay procedure. This review introduces the working principles and development of electrochemical immunosensors based on different signals, along with new achievements and progress related to electrochemical immunosensors in various fields. The importance of various types of nanomaterials for improving the performance of electrochemical immunosensor is also reviewed to provide a theoretical basis and guidance for the further development and application of nanomaterials in electrochemical immunosensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Immunosensors)
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Open AccessReview
Multiplexed Electrochemical Immunosensors for Clinical Biomarkers
Sensors 2017, 17(5), 965; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17050965 - 27 Apr 2017
Cited by 18
Abstract
Management and prognosis of disease requires the accurate determination of specific biomarkers indicative of normal or disease-related biological processes or responses to therapy. Moreover since multiple determinations of biomarkers have demonstrated to provide more accurate information than individual determinations to assist the clinician [...] Read more.
Management and prognosis of disease requires the accurate determination of specific biomarkers indicative of normal or disease-related biological processes or responses to therapy. Moreover since multiple determinations of biomarkers have demonstrated to provide more accurate information than individual determinations to assist the clinician in prognosis and diagnosis, the detection of several clinical biomarkers by using the same analytical device hold enormous potential for early detection and personalized therapy and will simplify the diagnosis providing more information in less time. In this field, electrochemical immunosensors have demonstrated to offer interesting alternatives against conventional strategies due to their simplicity, fast response, low cost, high sensitivity and compatibility with multiplexed determination, microfabrication technology and decentralized determinations, features which made them very attractive for integration in point-of-care (POC) devices. Therefore, in this review, the relevance and current challenges of multiplexed determination of clinical biomarkers are briefly introduced, and an overview of the electrochemical immunosensing platforms developed so far for this purpose is given in order to demonstrate the great potential of these methodologies. After highlighting the main features of the selected examples, the unsolved challenges and future directions in this field are also briefly discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Immunosensors)
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Open AccessReview
Recent Advances in Electrochemical Immunosensors
Sensors 2017, 17(4), 794; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17040794 - 07 Apr 2017
Cited by 23
Abstract
Immunosensors have experienced a very significant growth in recent years, driven by the need for fast, sensitive, portable and easy-to-use devices to detect biomarkers for clinical diagnosis or to monitor organic pollutants in natural or industrial environments. Advances in the field of signal [...] Read more.
Immunosensors have experienced a very significant growth in recent years, driven by the need for fast, sensitive, portable and easy-to-use devices to detect biomarkers for clinical diagnosis or to monitor organic pollutants in natural or industrial environments. Advances in the field of signal amplification using enzymatic reactions, nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene derivatives, metallic nanoparticles (gold, silver, various oxides or metal complexes), or magnetic beads show how it is possible to improve collection, binding or transduction performances and reach the requirements for realistic clinical diagnostic or environmental control. This review presents these most recent advances; it focuses first on classical electrode substrates, then moves to carbon-based nanostructured ones including carbon nanotubes, graphene and other carbon materials, metal or metal-oxide nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, dendrimers and, to finish, explore the use of ionic liquids. Analytical performances are systematically covered and compared, depending on the detection principle, but also from a chronological perspective, from 2012 to 2016 and early 2017. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Immunosensors)
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