sensors-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Chemiresistive Sensors

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2016) | Viewed by 36070

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Inha University, 100 Inha-ro, Incheon 22212, Republic of Korea
Interests: synthesis and application of nanomaterials including nanowires and nanofibers; thin-film processing; surface and interface analysis; chemical gas sensor
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Gas Sensors Laboratory, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Korea
Interests: gas sensor; nanowire sensor; nanofiber sensor; new materials sensor; chemical sensor; environmental monitoring; carbon-related sensor; electronic nose; gas sensor applications; radiation detectors; gas sensing mechanisms; breath gas sensor; healthcare and medical application; wearable sensor; electrochemical sensor
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, detection of gas-phase chemical species is becoming more important in order to maintain the safety of daily life and human health. In addition, an emerging application of chemiresistive-type sensors is diagnosing diseases via detecting particular biomarkers. The advantages of chemiresistive-type sensors, based on semiconducting metal oxides over other types of chemical sensors, include simplicity in operation, flexibility in mass production, potential for miniaturization, and low cost. Despite the recent advances regarding improvements in the sensing performance of chemiresistive-type sensors, ppb-scale detection, selective detection under a mixed gas condition, and being embedded into mobile electronic appliances with low power consumption still remain a great challenge. This Special Issue of Sensors will highlight the state-of-the-art technologies in the chemiresistive-type sensors. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Self-powered chemiresistive sensors
  • Low power chemiresistive sensors
  • Nanowire sensors
  • Nanofiber sensors
  • Functionalization or decoration
  • Graphene or graphene-loaded sensors
  • 2D materials sensors
  • Advanced nanostructured sensor materials
  • New chemistry, new composite sensor materials
  • Health diagnosis based on chemiresistive sensors

Prof. Sang Sub Kim
Prof. Hyoun Woo Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Chemiresistive sensor
  • Nanowire sensor
  • Nanofiber sensor
  • Semiconducting sensor
  • Self-powered sensor
  • Functionalization
  • Decoration
  • Nanostructured sensor

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

2588 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Surface Cleaning Procedures in Terms of Gas Sensing Properties of Spray-Deposited CNT Film: Thermal- and O2 Plasma Treatments
by Joon Hyub Kim, Min-Jung Song, Ki Beom Kim, Joon-Hyung Jin and Nam Ki Min
Sensors 2017, 17(1), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/s17010073 - 30 Dec 2016
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4859
Abstract
The effect of cleaning the surface of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks by thermal and the O2 plasma treatments is presented in terms of NH3 gas sensing characteristics. The goal of this work is to determine the relationship between the physicochemical [...] Read more.
The effect of cleaning the surface of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks by thermal and the O2 plasma treatments is presented in terms of NH3 gas sensing characteristics. The goal of this work is to determine the relationship between the physicochemical properties of the cleaned surface (including the chemical composition, crystal structure, hydrophilicity, and impurity content) and the sensitivity of the SWNT network films to NH3 gas. The SWNT networks are spray-deposited on pre-patterned Pt electrodes, and are further functionalized by heating on a programmable hot plate or by O2 plasma treatment in a laboratory-prepared plasma chamber. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to semi-quantitatively evaluate each surface state of various plasma-treated SWNT-based electrodes. The results show that O2 plasma treatment can more effectively modify the SWNT network surface than thermal cleaning, and can provide a better conductive network surface due to the larger number of carbonyl/carboxyl groups, enabling a faster electron transfer rate, even though both the thermal cleaning and the O2 plasma cleaning methods can eliminate the organic solvent residues from the network surface. The NH3 sensors based on the O2 plasma-treated SWNT network exhibit higher sensitivity, shorter response time, and better recovery of the initial resistance than those prepared employing the thermally-cleaned SWNT networks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemiresistive Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

5862 KiB  
Article
Improvement of Toluene-Sensing Performance of SnO2 Nanofibers by Pt Functionalization
by Jae-Hun Kim, Zain Ul Abideen, Yifang Zheng and Sang Sub Kim
Sensors 2016, 16(11), 1857; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16111857 - 04 Nov 2016
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 5415
Abstract
Functionalization of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on oxide materials is a commonly employed technique for enhancing the sensitivity and selectivity of materials for gas sensing applications. In this study, we functionalized electrospinning-synthesized SnO2 nanofibers (NFs) with various amounts of Pt NPs to enhance [...] Read more.
Functionalization of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on oxide materials is a commonly employed technique for enhancing the sensitivity and selectivity of materials for gas sensing applications. In this study, we functionalized electrospinning-synthesized SnO2 nanofibers (NFs) with various amounts of Pt NPs to enhance the toluene-sensing properties. In particular, Pt NPs were prepared by deposition of Pt films by sputtering and subsequent heat treatment. Electronic and chemical sensitizations by the Pt NPs were responsible for the improved toluene sensitivity. The best sensing properties were achieved at an optimized amount of Pt NPs, showing a volcano shape in relation to the amount of Pt NPs. The method used in this study is useful for the development of toluene-sensitive and -selective chemiresistive NF-based gas sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemiresistive Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

2312 KiB  
Article
Planar Indium Tin Oxide Heater for Improved Thermal Distribution for Metal Oxide Micromachined Gas Sensors
by M. Cihan Çakır, Deniz Çalışkan, Bayram Bütün and Ekmel Özbay
Sensors 2016, 16(10), 1612; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16101612 - 29 Sep 2016
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 11040
Abstract
Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although [...] Read more.
Metal oxide gas sensors with integrated micro-hotplate structures are widely used in the industry and they are still being investigated and developed. Metal oxide gas sensors have the advantage of being sensitive to a wide range of organic and inorganic volatile compounds, although they lack selectivity. To introduce selectivity, the operating temperature of a single sensor is swept, and the measurements are fed to a discriminating algorithm. The efficiency of those data processing methods strongly depends on temperature uniformity across the active area of the sensor. To achieve this, hot plate structures with complex resistor geometries have been designed and additional heat-spreading structures have been introduced. In this work we designed and fabricated a metal oxide gas sensor integrated with a simple square planar indium tin oxide (ITO) heating element, by using conventional micromachining and thin-film deposition techniques. Power consumption–dependent surface temperature measurements were performed. A 420 °C working temperature was achieved at 120 mW power consumption. Temperature distribution uniformity was measured and a 17 °C difference between the hottest and the coldest points of the sensor at an operating temperature of 290 °C was achieved. Transient heat-up and cool-down cycle durations are measured as 40 ms and 20 ms, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemiresistive Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

2446 KiB  
Article
Zwitterionic Surfactant Modified Acetylene Black Paste Electrode for Highly Facile and Sensitive Determination of Tetrabromobisphenol A
by Xiaoyun Wei, Qiang Zhao, Weixiang Wu, Tong Zhou, Shunli Jiang, Yeqing Tong and Qing Lu
Sensors 2016, 16(9), 1539; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16091539 - 21 Sep 2016
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 5883
Abstract
A electrochemical sensor for the highly sensitive detection of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) was fabricated based on acetylene black paste electrode (ABPE) modified with 3-(N,N-Dimethylpalmitylammonio) propanesulfonate (SB3-16) in this study. The peak current of TBBPA was significantly enhanced at SB3-16/ABPE [...] Read more.
A electrochemical sensor for the highly sensitive detection of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) was fabricated based on acetylene black paste electrode (ABPE) modified with 3-(N,N-Dimethylpalmitylammonio) propanesulfonate (SB3-16) in this study. The peak current of TBBPA was significantly enhanced at SB3-16/ABPE compared with unmodified electrodes. To further improve the electrochemical performance of the modified electrode, corresponding experimental parameters such as the length of hydrophobic chains of zwitterionic surfactant, the concentration of SB3-16, pH value, and accumulation time were examined. The peak currents of TBBPA were found to be linearly correlated with its concentrations in the range of 1 nM to 1 µM, with a detection limit of 0.4 nM. Besides, a possible mechanism was also discussed, and the hydrophobic interaction between TBBPA and the surfactants was suggested to take a leading role in enhancing the responses. Finally, this sensor was successfully employed to detect TBBPA in water samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemiresistive Sensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

8554 KiB  
Article
CO Gas Sensing Properties of Pure and Cu-Incorporated SnO2 Nanoparticles: A Study of Cu-Induced Modifications
by Tangirala Venkata Krishna Karthik, María De la Luz Olvera, Arturo Maldonado and Heberto Gómez Pozos
Sensors 2016, 16(8), 1283; https://doi.org/10.3390/s16081283 - 15 Aug 2016
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 7748
Abstract
Pure and copper (Cu)-incorporated tin oxide (SnO2) pellet gas sensors with characteristics provoking gas sensitivity were fabricated and used for measuring carbon monoxide (CO) atmospheres. Non-spherical pure SnO2 nano-structures were prepared by using urea as the precipitation agent. The resultant [...] Read more.
Pure and copper (Cu)-incorporated tin oxide (SnO2) pellet gas sensors with characteristics provoking gas sensitivity were fabricated and used for measuring carbon monoxide (CO) atmospheres. Non-spherical pure SnO2 nano-structures were prepared by using urea as the precipitation agent. The resultant SnO2 powders were ball milled and incorporated with a transition metal, Cu, via chemical synthesis method. The incorporation is confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) analysis. By utilizing Cu-incorporated SnO2 pellets an increase in the CO sensitivity by an order of three, and a decrease in the response and recovery times by an order of two, were obtained. This improvement in the sensitivity is due to two factors that arise due to Cu incorporation: necks between the microparticles and stacking faults in the grains. These two factors increased the conductivity and oxygen adsorption, respectively, at the pellets’ surface of SnO2 which, in turn, raised the CO sensitivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemiresistive Sensors)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop