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Special Issue "Sensors for Cultural Heritage Monitoring"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Robert Sitnik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Micromechanics and Photonics, Mechatronics Faculty, Warsaw University of Technology, Św. A. Boboli 8, 520 room, 02-525 Warsaw, Poland
Tel. +48222348283
Interests: 3D/4D imaging, 3D/4D measurement, optical metrology, 3D/4D data analysis
Prof. Dr. Alamin Mansouri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Image and Artificial Vision ImViA EA 7535 (Former LE2I), University of Burgundy, 9 Avenue Alain Savary, BP 47870 21078 Dijon Cedex, France
Interests: color and spectral imaging, appearance capture and modeling, cultural heritage documentation and analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Methods of measurement, diagnostics and the monitoring of cultural heritage objects are becoming more and more necessary. The data obtained is used to make the right decisions related to conservation interventions and daily treatment. The diversification of materials and surface characteristics means that there is a need for the continuous development of new measurement methods and their application in sensors. It is also often necessary to use several measurement methods to obtain the full information about the object. In the case of repeated measurements, the development of a spatial data integration solution is required, as well as a quantitative and qualitative analysis over time. An important aspect is also the visualization of results presenting key information in a readable way for the inexperienced user. Modern sensors for cultural heritage integrate physical measurement methods and advanced data processing algorithms.

Submitted papers can address the development of single or multimodal measurement techniques, the analysis of data from sensors, aspects of diagnostics and the monitoring of specific objects or groups of objects. We especially encourage submissions that include demonstrations of actual applications in the field or prototypes that resemble a realistic scenario.

Prof. Dr. Robert Sitnik
Prof. Dr. Alamin Mansouri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cultural heritage
  • multimodal measurement
  • state of preservation monitoring
  • multimodal analysis
  • physical sensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Gaussian Process Model for Color Camera Characterization: Assessment in Outdoor Levantine Rock Art Scenes
Sensors 2019, 19(21), 4610; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19214610 - 23 Oct 2019
Abstract
In this paper, we propose a novel approach to undertake the colorimetric camera characterization procedure based on a Gaussian process (GP). GPs are powerful and flexible nonparametric models for multivariate nonlinear functions. To validate the GP model, we compare the results achieved with [...] Read more.
In this paper, we propose a novel approach to undertake the colorimetric camera characterization procedure based on a Gaussian process (GP). GPs are powerful and flexible nonparametric models for multivariate nonlinear functions. To validate the GP model, we compare the results achieved with a second-order polynomial model, which is the most widely used regression model for characterization purposes. We applied the methodology on a set of raw images of rock art scenes collected with two different Single Lens Reflex (SLR) cameras. A leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) procedure was used to assess the predictive performance of the models in terms of CIE XYZ residuals and Δ E a b * color differences. Values of less than 3 CIELAB units were achieved for Δ E a b * . The output sRGB characterized images show that both regression models are suitable for practical applications in cultural heritage documentation. However, the results show that colorimetric characterization based on the Gaussian process provides significantly better results, with lower values for residuals and Δ E a b * . We also analyzed the induced noise into the output image after applying the camera characterization. As the noise depends on the specific camera, proper camera selection is essential for the photogrammetric work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Cultural Heritage Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
High Energy Double Peak Pulse Laser Induced Plasma Spectroscopy for Metal Characterization Using a Passively Q-Switched Laser Source and CCD Detector
Sensors 2019, 19(17), 3634; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19173634 - 21 Aug 2019
Abstract
Here, the development and testing of a portable double peak pulse laser induced plasma spectroscopy (DPP-LIPS) based on passively Q-switched Nd:YAG (Neodymium-doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet) laser excitation is reported. The latter delivered structured laser pulses at a repetition rate of up to 20 [...] Read more.
Here, the development and testing of a portable double peak pulse laser induced plasma spectroscopy (DPP-LIPS) based on passively Q-switched Nd:YAG (Neodymium-doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet) laser excitation is reported. The latter delivered structured laser pulses at a repetition rate of up to 20 Hz, including two energy peaks of about 100 mJ each with a relative temporal spacing of about 80 µs. Plasma spectra were collected using a low-cost Czerny–Turner spectrometer equipped with a non-intensified CCD (Charge-Coupled Device) array. Such a DPP-LIPS setup is technologically simpler and cheaper than the usual ones. Despite the relatively large temporal separation between the mentioned laser peaks, significant spectral intensity enhancements with respect to the usual single peak pulse configuration were observed. The amplification factor measured ranged between 2 and 10, depending on the specific emission peaks and the Q-switched configuration, and a consequent significant improvement of the detection limit of trace elements was observed. The instrument was calibrated for the quantitative analysis of copper alloy through systematic measurements carried out on reference samples and was then tested in an example archaeometric characterization of a statuette from the Egyptian Museum of Florence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Cultural Heritage Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
Acoustic Sensor Data Flow for Cultural Heritage Monitoring and Safeguarding
Sensors 2019, 19(7), 1629; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19071629 - 05 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Cultural heritage sites, apart from being the tangible link to a country’s history and culture, actively contribute to the national economy, offering a foundation upon which cultural tourism can develop. This importance at the cultural and economic level, advocates for the need for [...] Read more.
Cultural heritage sites, apart from being the tangible link to a country’s history and culture, actively contribute to the national economy, offering a foundation upon which cultural tourism can develop. This importance at the cultural and economic level, advocates for the need for preservation of cultural heritage sites for the future generations. To this end, advanced monitoring systems harnessing the power of sensors are deployed near the sites to collect data which can fuel systems and processes aimed at protection and preservation. In this paper we present the use of acoustic sensors for safeguarding cultural sites located in rural or urban areas, based on a novel data flow framework. We developed and deployed Wireless Acoustic Sensors Networks that record audio signals, which are transferred to a modular cloud platform to be processed using an efficient deep learning algorithm (f1-score: 0.838) to identify audio sources of interest for each site, taking into account the materials the assets are made of. The extracted information is presented exploiting the designed STORM Audio Signal ontology and then fused with spatiotemporal information using semantic rules. The results of this work give valuable insight to the cultural experts and are publicly available using the Linked Open Data format. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Cultural Heritage Monitoring)
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