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Special Issue "Sensors for Environmental and Life Science Applications"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Najla Fourati
Website
Guest Editor
SATIE Laboratory, UMR CNRS 8029,Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, 75003 Paris, France
Interests: surface acoustic wave (SAW) bio and chemical sensors; electrochemical bio and chemical sensors; surface modification; AFM
Prof. Dr. Mohamed M. Chehimi
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Institut de Chimie et des Matériaux Paris-Est (ICMPE), CNRS, Thiais, France
Interests: surface chemical modification; polymer grafts; polymer composites; sensors; adsorbents; surface analysis; XPS
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Real-time and in situ "warn, inform, and prevent" capabilities are the main goals of sensors for environmental and life science applications. Chemical and biological sensors are certainly the most appropriate devices that can fulfill these requirements. In recent years, much time and effort have been spent on electrochemical, optical, and gravimetric sensors, among others. The recent developments are directed towards minimal preparation of the sensing materials with sub-picomolar detection, portability for on-site and wireless/remote detections, multiplexed and parallel sensing, and smartphone applications.

This Special Issue will provide an opportunity for researchers to publish their original achievements related to the design, characterization, and validation of chemical and biological sensors for environmental and life science applications.

The Special Issue welcomes both original research and review articles that address the following non-exhaustive list of topics:

-Architecture of sensing materials: sp² C-based nanomaterials, metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles, composite materials, colloidal crystals and inverse opals, molecularly and ion-imprinted polymers, stretchable and implantable materials, antibodies, DNA, enzymes, etc.

-Analytes: molecules (drugs, toxins, pesticides, illicit substances, dyes, endocrine disruptors, glucose and related compounds, biocides), metal ions in the environment and in body fluids, (bio)macromolecules such as cancer markers, counterfeit medicines, etc.

-Matrices: body fluids, food and beverage samples, waste, rain, river waters, samples from water treatment plants and fish farms, landfill, etc.

-Devices: electrochemical sensors, optical sensors, piezoelectric sensors, magnetic sensors, immunosensors, DNA chips, microfluidic devices, mico/nano-sensors, printable sensors, wearable sensors, implantable sensors, sensing platforms, and smartphone-based sensing devices

We anticipate that this Special Issue will be of interest to our peers and newcomers in the field of sensors for environment and life science applications, as it covers several aspects ranging from surface chemistry and design of the sensing materials to the fabrication of devices for laboratory testing and on-site and remote sensing.

Dr. Najla Fourati
Prof. Dr. Mohamed M. Chehimi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental pollutants
  • Bio(macro)molecules
  • Drugs, toxins, and biocides
  • Sensing materials architecture
  • Surface modification
  • Body fluids
  • Water quality
  • Soils and treatment plants
  • Chemical and biological sensors
  • Sensing platforms
  • Portable devices
  • Wireless sensing

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Inline Infrared Chemical Identification of Particulate Matter
Sensors 2020, 20(15), 4193; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20154193 - 28 Jul 2020
Abstract
The health and environmental effects of particulate matter (PM) in the air depend on several parameters. Besides particle size, shape, and concentration, the chemical nature of the PM is also of great importance. State-of-the-art PM sensors only detect the particle size and concentration. [...] Read more.
The health and environmental effects of particulate matter (PM) in the air depend on several parameters. Besides particle size, shape, and concentration, the chemical nature of the PM is also of great importance. State-of-the-art PM sensors only detect the particle size and concentration. Small, low-cost sensors only identify PM according to PM2.5 and PM10 standards. Larger detectors measure the complete particle size distribution. However, the chemical composition of PM is not often assessed. The current paper presents the initial stages of the development of an infrared-based detector for the inline assessment of the chemistry of PM in the air. By combining a mini cyclone that is able to concentrate the particles at least a thousand fold and a hollow waveguide that aligns the flow of particles with infrared light, the feasibility of the concept was shown in this study. A clear differentiation between amorphous and crystalline silica was demonstrated at outdoor PM levels of lower than 1 mg per cubic meter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Environmental and Life Science Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Ratiometric Strategy for Electrochemical Sensing of Carbaryl Residue in Water and Vegetable Samples
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1524; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051524 - 10 Mar 2020
Abstract
Accurate analysis of pesticide residue in real samples is essential for food safety and environmental protection. However, a traditional electrochemical sensor based on single-signal output is easily affected by background noise, environmental conditions, electrode diversity, and a complex matrix of samples, leading to [...] Read more.
Accurate analysis of pesticide residue in real samples is essential for food safety and environmental protection. However, a traditional electrochemical sensor based on single-signal output is easily affected by background noise, environmental conditions, electrode diversity, and a complex matrix of samples, leading to extremely low accuracy. Hence, in this paper, a ratiometric strategy based on dual-signal output was adopted to build inner correction for sensing of widely-used carbaryl (CBL) for the first time. By comparison, Nile blue A (NB) was selected as reference probe, due to its well-defined peak, few effects on the target peak of CBL, and excellent stability. The effects of a derivatization method, technique mode, and pH were also investigated. Then the performance of the proposed ratiometric sensor was assessed in terms of three aspects including the elimination of system noise, electrode deviation and matrix effect. Compared with traditional single-signal sensor, the ratiometric sensor showed a much better linear correlation coefficient (r > 0.99), reproducibility (RSD < 10%), and limit of detection (LOD = 1.0 μM). The results indicated the introduction of proper reference probe could ensure the interdependence of target and reference signal on the same sensing environment, thus inner correction was fulfilled, which provided a promising tool for accurate analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Environmental and Life Science Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Coupling of Anodic Stripping Voltammetry with Sampled-Current Voltammetry on an Electrode Array: Application to Lead Detection
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1327; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051327 - 29 Feb 2020
Abstract
Electrochemical detection systems are very promising for pollution monitoring owing to their easy miniaturization and low cost. For this purpose, we have recently developed a new concept of device based on Electrodes Array for Sampled-Current Voltammetry (EASCV), which is compatible with miniaturization and [...] Read more.
Electrochemical detection systems are very promising for pollution monitoring owing to their easy miniaturization and low cost. For this purpose, we have recently developed a new concept of device based on Electrodes Array for Sampled-Current Voltammetry (EASCV), which is compatible with miniaturization and portability. In this work, to improve the sensitivity of the analytical method, we added a preconcentration step before EASCV analysis, combining sampled-current voltammetry with anodic stripping voltammetry. Lead was chosen as analyte for this probe of concept owing to its high toxicity. The conditions for electrodeposition of lead on gold were optimized by means of under potential deposition. Current intensities 300 times higher than with linear sweep anodic stripping voltammetry were obtained, showing the interest in the method. The value of the sampling time directly affected the sensitivity of the sensor given by the slope of the linear calibration curve. The sensor exhibited a limit of detection of 1.16 mg L−1, similar to those obtained with linear sweep anodic stripping voltammetry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Environmental and Life Science Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Nanocomposite Based on Poly (para-phenylene)/Chemical Reduced Graphene Oxide as a Platform for Simultaneous Detection of Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1256; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051256 - 25 Feb 2020
Abstract
In this study, an efficient and simple designed nanohybrid created for individual and simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). This nanohybrid is a combination of chemical reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) and redox poly(para-phenylene) (Fc-ac-PP) modified in a [...] Read more.
In this study, an efficient and simple designed nanohybrid created for individual and simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). This nanohybrid is a combination of chemical reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) and redox poly(para-phenylene) (Fc-ac-PP) modified in a lateral position with ferrrocenyl group CRGO/Fc-ac-PPP. The CRGO/Fc-ac-PPP nanohybrid demonstrated a synergistic effect resulting in a large conductivity, surface area and catalytic properties provided by the redox attached ferrocene. Moreover, this nanocomposite is able to detect individually as well as simultaneously AA, DA and UA in a co-existence system with defined and separated redox peaks oxidation. The linear response ranges for AA, DA and UA, when detected simultaneously, are 0.1–10000 μM, 0.0001–1000 μM and 0.1–10000 μM, respectively, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) are 0.046 μM, 0.2 nM and 0.013 μM, respectively. The proposed sensor shown satisfactory results when applied to real spiked urine samples for measuring the abnormal high or lowconcentration of AA, DA and UA in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Environmental and Life Science Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Polypyrrole-Wrapped Carbon Nanotube Composite Films Coated on Diazonium-Modified Flexible ITO Sheets for the Electroanalysis of Heavy Metal Ions
Sensors 2020, 20(3), 580; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20030580 - 21 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Highly sensitive multicomponent materials designed for the recognition of hazardous compounds request control over interfacial chemistry. The latter is a key parameter in the construction of the sensing (macro) molecular architectures. In this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited on diazonium-modified, flexible [...] Read more.
Highly sensitive multicomponent materials designed for the recognition of hazardous compounds request control over interfacial chemistry. The latter is a key parameter in the construction of the sensing (macro) molecular architectures. In this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited on diazonium-modified, flexible indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes prior to the electropolymerization of pyrrole. This three-step process, including diazonium electroreduction, the deposition of CNTs and electropolymerization, provided adhesively-bonded, polypyrrole-wrapped CNT composite coatings on aminophenyl-modified flexible ITO sheets. The aminophenyl (AP) groups were attached to ITO by electroreduction of the in-situ generated aminobenzenediazonium compound in aqueous, acidic medium. For the first time, polypyrrole (PPy) was electrodeposited in the presence of both benzenesulfonic acid (dopant) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), which acts as a chelator. The flexible electrodes were characterized by XPS, Raman and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which provided strong supporting evidence for the wrapping of CNTs by the electrodeposited PPy. Indeed, the CNT average diameter increased from 18 ± 2.6 nm to 27 ± 4.8, 35.6 ± 5.9 and 175 ± 20.1 after 1, 5 and 10 of electropolymerization of pyrrole, respectively. The PPy/CNT/NH2-ITO films generated by this strategy exhibit significantly improved stability and higher conductivity compared to a similar PPy coating without any embedded CNTs, as assessed by from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The potentiometric response was linear in the 10−8–3 × 10−7 mol L−1 Pb(II) concentration range, and the detection limit was 2.9 × 10−9 mol L−1 at S/N = 3. The EGTA was found to drastically improve selectivity for Pb(II) over Cu(II). To account for this improvement, the density functional theory (DFT) was employed to calculate the EGTA–metal ion interaction energy, which was found to be −374.6 and −116.4 kJ/mol for Pb(II) and Cu(II), respectively, considering solvation effects. This work demonstrates the power of a subtle combination of diazonium coupling agent, CNTs, chelators and conductive polymers to design high-performance electrochemical sensors for environmental applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Environmental and Life Science Applications)
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