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Special Issue "Optical Fibers for Distributed Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Peter Dragic
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
Interests: Eoptical fiber; optical fiber materials; optical fiber design; distributed sensing; fiber lasers; optical remote sensing; novel applications for optical fiber
Dr. John Ballato
Website
Guest Editor
The Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET) and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA
Interests: optical fiber fabrication; optical fiber materials; glass science; spectroscopy and light emission

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Distributed fiber optic sensors have become powerful tools used to quantify dynamic physical characteristics such as temperature, strain, acoustics, vibration, pressure, and shape in real time. Applications are wide-reaching and include structural health monitoring, intrusion detection, leak detection, undersea weather sensing, geological sensing, to name a few, and they are often used in harsh, high-temperature and pressure environments. In these systems, the optical fiber is the sensing medium, and unlike with free-space systems, one can design and optimize a fiber for a given application. The aim of this Special Issue is to focus on the optical fiber developments that continue to enable and enhance these high-performance distributed sensing systems.

We invite manuscripts, both reviews and regular submissions, for this forthcoming Special Issue, entitled “Optical Fibers for Distributed Sensors,” in all aspects pertinent to the optical fiber utilized in these systems:

  • Optical fiber waveguide design and development
  • Single mode, multimode, multicore, and microstructured fibers
  • Novel materials, including glass, semiconductor, crystalline, and organic
  • Multimaterial, composite, and “smart” fibers
  • Raman, Rayleigh, and Brillouin sensing
  • Active fiber technologies, such as rare earth, semiconductor, or nanoparticle doped fibers
  • Fiber coating technology
  • Designer response to thermomechanical environment, including athermal or atensic fiber sensors
  • Fibers for harsh environments
  • Cost-reducing and disruptive optical fiber technologies
  • Novel applications and systems

Dr. Peter Dragic
Dr. John Ballato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optical fiber
  • distributed sensing
  • optical fiber sensors
  • Brillouin scattering
  • Raman scattering
  • Rayleigh scattering
  • optical fiber materials
  • optical fiber fabrication
  • optical fiber coatings

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Performance Improvement of Dual-Pulse Heterodyne Distributed Acoustic Sensor for Sound Detection
Sensors 2020, 20(4), 999; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20040999 - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
Phase fading is fatal to the performance of distributed acoustic sensors (DASs) influencing its capability of distributed measurement as well as its noise level. Here, we report the experimental observation of a strong negative correlation between the relative power spectrum density (PSD) at [...] Read more.
Phase fading is fatal to the performance of distributed acoustic sensors (DASs) influencing its capability of distributed measurement as well as its noise level. Here, we report the experimental observation of a strong negative correlation between the relative power spectrum density (PSD) at the heterodyne frequency and the noise floor of the detected phase for the heterodyne demodulated distributed acoustic sensor (HD-DAS) system. We further propose a weighted-channel stack algorithm (WCSA) to alleviate the phase fading noise via an enhancement of the relative PSD at the heterodyne frequency. Experimental results show that the phase noise of the demodulated signal can be suppressed by 13.7 dB under optimal condition. As a potential application, we exploited the improved HD-DAS system to retrieve a piece of music lasted for 205 s, demonstrating the reliability of detecting wideband sound signal without distortion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fibers for Distributed Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Smart Build-Plate for Metal Additive Manufacturing Processes
Sensors 2020, 20(2), 360; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20020360 - 08 Jan 2020
Abstract
This paper discusses the development, processing steps, and evaluation of a smart build-plate or baseplate tool for metal additive manufacturing technologies. This tool uses an embedded high-definition fiber optic sensing fiber to measure strain states from temperature and residual stress within the build-plate [...] Read more.
This paper discusses the development, processing steps, and evaluation of a smart build-plate or baseplate tool for metal additive manufacturing technologies. This tool uses an embedded high-definition fiber optic sensing fiber to measure strain states from temperature and residual stress within the build-plate for monitoring purposes. Monitoring entails quality tracking for consistency along with identifying defect formation and growth, i.e., delamination or crack events near the build-plate surface. An aluminum alloy 6061 build-plate was manufactured using ultrasonic additive manufacturing due to the process’ low formation temperature and capability of embedding fiber optic sensing fiber without damage. Laser-powder bed fusion (L-PBF) was then used to print problematic geometries onto the build-plate using AlSi10Mg for evaluation purposes. The tool identified heat generation, delamination onset, and delamination growth of the printed L-PBF parts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fibers for Distributed Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation of a Signal Demodulation Method based on Wavelet Transformation for OFDR to Enhance Its Distributed Sensing Performance
Sensors 2019, 19(13), 2850; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19132850 - 27 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Optical fiber distributed sensing that is based on optical frequency domain reflectometer (OFDR) is a promising technology for achieving a highest spatial resolution downwards to several millimeters. An OFDR signal demodulation method that is based on Morlet wavelet transformation (WT) is demonstrated in [...] Read more.
Optical fiber distributed sensing that is based on optical frequency domain reflectometer (OFDR) is a promising technology for achieving a highest spatial resolution downwards to several millimeters. An OFDR signal demodulation method that is based on Morlet wavelet transformation (WT) is demonstrated in detail to improve the resolution of distributed sensing physical quantity under a high spatial resolution, aiming at the trade-off between spatial and spectrum resolution. The spectrum resolution, spatial interval of the measured gauges, and spatial resolution can be manually controlled by adjusting the wavelet parameters. The experimental results that were achieved by the wavelet transformation (WT) method are compared with these by short time Fourier transformation (STFT) method and they indicate that significant improvements, such as strain resolution of 1 με, spatial resolution of 5 mm, average repeatability of 4.3 με, and stability of 7.3 με within one hour, have been achieved. The advantages of this method are high spatial and spectral resolution, robust, and applicability with current OFDR systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fibers for Distributed Sensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Advances of Area-Wise Distributed Monitoring Using Long Gauge Sensing Techniques
Sensors 2019, 19(5), 1038; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19051038 - 28 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper provides an overview of the area-wise distributed monitoring based on long gauge sensing to meet the requirements in the field of structural health monitoring (SHM), the methodology is reviewed and its application is discussed in this paper. First, a long gauge [...] Read more.
This paper provides an overview of the area-wise distributed monitoring based on long gauge sensing to meet the requirements in the field of structural health monitoring (SHM), the methodology is reviewed and its application is discussed in this paper. First, a long gauge sensing technique developed for SHM, which utilizes carbon fiber and optical fiber sensors with important technical improvements is introduced and described. Second, area-wise distributed monitoring is discussed in order to demonstrate the high-performance of this approach in structural monitoring using a network of long gauge sensors. Third, theories of processing area-wise distributed monitoring data for comprehensive structural identification have been developed, which perform a rich recognition of local and global structural parameters including structural deflections, dynamic characteristics, damages, and loads. This area-wise distributed monitoring concept and the aforementioned long gauge sensing technique are finally embedded into an SHM system to offer a viable monitoring solution for groups and networks of infrastructural systems. Some successful applications are cited to confirm the effectiveness of the SHM system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fibers for Distributed Sensors)
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