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Special Issue "Biosensors with Magnetic Nanocomponents"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Professor Galina V. Kurlyandskaya
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universidad del Pais Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Campus Bizkaia, Departamento de Electricidad y Electrónica, Bilbao, Spain
Tel. +34946013237
Interests: Magnetism; Magnetic materials; Magnetic sensors; Magnetic biosensors; Magnetoresistance; Magnetoimpedance; Magnetic nanoparticles; Magnetic multilayers; Ferrofluids; Ferrogels; Microwave absorption
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The selective and quantitative detection of biocomponents is greatly requested in biomedical applications and clinical diagnostics. Many traditional magnetic materials are not suitable for the ever-increasing demands of these processes. The push for a new generation of micro-scale sensors for bioapplications continues to challenge the materials science community to develop novel nanostructures that are suitable for such purposes. The principal requirements of a new generation of nanomaterials for sensor applications are based on well-known demands: high sensitivity, small size, low power consumption, stability, quick response, resistance to aggressive media, low price, and operation by non-skilled personnel. There are different types of magnetic effects capable of creating sensors for biology, medicine and drug delivery: magnetoresistance, spin-valves, Hall and inductive effects, and giant magnetoimpedance. The present goal is to design nanomaterials both for magnetic markers and sensitive elements as synergetic pairs working in one device with adjusted characteristics of both materials. Synthetic approaches using the advantages of simulation methods and synthetic materials mimicking natural tissue properties can be useful, as well as the further development of modeling strategies for magnetic nanostructures. Short communications, research papers and review articles are welcome. We would appreciate very much receiving the tentative title of your contribution if you are interested in submission.

Prof. Galina V. Kurlyandskaya
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Magnetic multilayers
  • Magnetic wires and nanowires
  • Nanostructured magnetic materials
  • Nanostructured composites
  • Complex structures with magnetic nanocomponents
  • Magnetic biosensors
  • Magnetic nanoparticles
  • Ferrofluids
  • Ferrogels
  • Modeling for magnetic nanostructures

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Size-Dependent Properties of Magnetosensitive Polymersomes: Computer Modelling
Sensors 2019, 19(23), 5266; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19235266 - 29 Nov 2019
Abstract
Magnetosensitive polymersomes, which are amphiphilic polymer capsules whose membranes are filled with magnetic nanoparticles, are prospective objects for drug delivery and manipulations with single cells. A molecular dynamics simulation model that is able to render a detailed account on the structure and shape [...] Read more.
Magnetosensitive polymersomes, which are amphiphilic polymer capsules whose membranes are filled with magnetic nanoparticles, are prospective objects for drug delivery and manipulations with single cells. A molecular dynamics simulation model that is able to render a detailed account on the structure and shape response of a polymersome to an external magnetic field is used to study a dimensional effect: the dependence of the field-induced deformation on the size of this nanoscale object. It is shown that in the material parameter range that resembles realistic conditions, the strain response of smaller polymersomes, against a priori expectations, exceeds that of larger ones. A qualitative explanation for this behavior is proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors with Magnetic Nanocomponents)
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Open AccessArticle
Ferrogels Ultrasonography for Biomedical Applications
Sensors 2019, 19(18), 3959; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19183959 - 13 Sep 2019
Abstract
Ferrogels (FG) are magnetic composites that are widely used in the area of biomedical engineering and biosensing. In this work, ferrogels with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized by the radical polymerization of acrylamide in stabilized aqueous ferrofluid. FG samples were [...] Read more.
Ferrogels (FG) are magnetic composites that are widely used in the area of biomedical engineering and biosensing. In this work, ferrogels with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized by the radical polymerization of acrylamide in stabilized aqueous ferrofluid. FG samples were prepared in various shapes that are suitable for different characterization techniques. Thin cylindrical samples were used to simulate the case of targeted drug delivery test through blood vessels. Samples of larger size that were in the shape of cylindrical plates were used for the evaluation of the FG applicability as substitutes for damaged structures, such as bone or cartilage tissues. Regardless of the shape of the samples and the conditions of their location, the boundaries of FG were confidently visualized over the entire range of concentrations of MNPs while using medical ultrasound. The amplitude of the reflected echo signal was higher for the higher concentration of MNPs in the gel. This result was not related to the influence of the MNPs on the intensity of the reflected echo signal directly, since the wavelength of the ultrasonic effect used is much larger than the particle size. Qualitative theoretical model for the understanding of the experimental results was proposed while taking into account the concept that at the acoustic oscillations of the hydrogel, the macromolecular net, and water in the gel porous structure experience the viscous Stocks-like interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors with Magnetic Nanocomponents)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization and Relaxation Properties of a Series of Monodispersed Magnetic Nanoparticles
Sensors 2019, 19(15), 3396; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19153396 - 02 Aug 2019
Abstract
Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are relatively advanced nanomaterials, and are widely used in biology, physics and medicine, especially as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Characterization of the properties of magnetic nanoparticles plays an important role in the application of magnetic particles. As [...] Read more.
Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are relatively advanced nanomaterials, and are widely used in biology, physics and medicine, especially as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Characterization of the properties of magnetic nanoparticles plays an important role in the application of magnetic particles. As a contrast agent, the relaxation rate directly affects image enhancement. We characterized a series of monodispersed magnetic nanoparticles using different methods and measured their relaxation rates using a 0.47 T low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance instrument. Generally speaking, the properties of magnetic nanoparticles are closely related to their particle sizes; however, neither longitudinal relaxation rate r 1 nor transverse relaxation rate r 2 changes monotonously with the particle size d . Therefore, size can affect the magnetism of magnetic nanoparticles, but it is not the only factor. Then, we defined the relaxation rates r i (i = 1 or 2) using the induced magnetization of magnetic nanoparticles, and found that the correlation relationship between r 1 relaxation rate and r 1 relaxation rate is slightly worse, with a correlation coefficient of R 2 = 0.8939, while the correlation relationship between r 2 relaxation rate and r 2 relaxation rate is very obvious, with a correlation coefficient of R 2 = 0.9983. The main reason is that r 2 relaxation rate is related to the magnetic field inhomogeneity, produced by magnetic nanoparticles; however r 1 relaxation rate is mainly a result of the direct interaction of hydrogen nucleus in water molecules and the metal ions in magnetic nanoparticles to shorten the T 1 relaxation time, so it is not directly related to magnetic field inhomogeneity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors with Magnetic Nanocomponents)
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Open AccessArticle
Magnetoimpedance Effect in the Ribbon-Based Patterned Soft Ferromagnetic Meander-Shaped Elements for Sensor Application
Sensors 2019, 19(11), 2468; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19112468 - 29 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Amorphous and nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials have attracted much attention in the area of sensor applications. In this work, the magnetoimpedance (MI) effect of patterned soft ferromagnetic meander-shaped sensor elements has been investigated. They were fabricated starting from the cobalt-based amorphous ribbon using [...] Read more.
Amorphous and nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials have attracted much attention in the area of sensor applications. In this work, the magnetoimpedance (MI) effect of patterned soft ferromagnetic meander-shaped sensor elements has been investigated. They were fabricated starting from the cobalt-based amorphous ribbon using the lithography technique and chemical etching. Three-turn (S1: spacing s = 50 μm, width w = 300 μm, length l = 5 mm; S2: spacing s = 50 μm, width w = 400 μm, length l = 5 mm) and six-turn (S3: s = 40 μm, w = 250 μm, length l = 5 mm; S4: s = 40 μm, w = 250 μm and l = 8 mm) meanders were designed. The ‘n’ shaped meander part was denominated as “one turn”. The S4 meander possesses a maximum MI ratio calculated for the total impedance ΔZ/Z ≈ 250% with a sensitivity of about 36%/Oe (for the frequency of about 45 MHz), and an MI ratio calculated for the real part of the total impedance ΔR/R ≈ 250% with the sensitivity of about 32%/Oe (for the frequency of 50 MHz). Chemical etching and the length of the samples had a strong impact on the surface magnetic properties and the magnetoimpedance. A comparative analysis of the surface magnetic properties obtained by the magneto-optical Kerr technique and MI data shows that the designed ferromagnetic meander-shaped sensor elements can be recommended for high frequency sensor applications focused on the large drop analysis. Here we understand a single large drop as the water-based sample to analyze, placed onto the surface of the MI sensor element either by microsyringe (volue range 0.5–500 μL) or automatic dispenser (volume range 0.1–50 mL). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors with Magnetic Nanocomponents)
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Open AccessArticle
Magnetoimpedance in Symmetric and Non-Symmetric Nanostructured Multilayers: A Theoretical Study
Sensors 2019, 19(8), 1761; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19081761 - 12 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Intensive studies of the magnetoimpedance (MI) effect in nanostructured multilayers provide a good phenomenological basis and theoretical description for the symmetric case when top and bottom layers of ferromagnet/conductor/ferromagnet structure have the same thickness and consist of one magnetic layer each. At the [...] Read more.
Intensive studies of the magnetoimpedance (MI) effect in nanostructured multilayers provide a good phenomenological basis and theoretical description for the symmetric case when top and bottom layers of ferromagnet/conductor/ferromagnet structure have the same thickness and consist of one magnetic layer each. At the same time, there is no model to describe the MI response in multilayered films. Here, we propose the corresponding model and analyze the influence of the multilayer parameters on the field and frequency dependences of the MI. The approach is based on the calculation of the field distribution within the multilayer by means of a solution of lineralizied Maxwell equations together with the Landau–Lifshitz equation for the magnetization motion. The theoretical model developed allows one to explain qualitatively the main features of the MI effect in multilayers and could be useful for optimization of the film parameters. It might also be useful as a model case for the development of MI magnetic biosensors for magnetic biomarker detection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors with Magnetic Nanocomponents)
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