sensors-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Label-Free Sensor/Biosensors for Biomedical and Environmental Monitoring"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Laura Micheli
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry Sciences and Technologies, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome 00133, Italy
Interests: electrochemistry; electroanalysis; green synthesis of metal nanoparticles and polymers for electrochemical application; nanomaterials; electrochemical sensors and biosensors; screen printed-electrodes; hydrogel/sensor system
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Sunita Kumbhat
Website
Guest Editor
NanoBiosensor Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Jai Narain Vyas University, Jodhpur, India
Interests: surface plasmon resonance; electrochemistry; nanomaterials; sensors/ biosensors; nanofunctionalized sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of low cost and disposable sensors for biomedical and environmental monitoring is attracting the scientific as well as commercial world. Early diagnosis of diseases, detection of toxins in food, feed and water are important aspects of present-day healthcare systems. Sensitive and selective detection of biomarker proteins, virus antigens, disease-specific antibodies, nucleic acids, clinically relevant low molecular weight analytes, endocrine disruptases, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other environmental pollutants is of great significance in the smart sensing technology of the point-of-care era.

The present Special Issue focuses on label-free sensor/biosensor devices/platforms for highly sensitivity physico-chemical transducers, which are feasible for miniaturization with special reference to biomedical and environmental applications.

Prof. Dr. Laura Micheli
Prof. Dr. Sunita Kumbhat
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • surface plasmon resonance
  • electrochemical sensors
  • nanofunctionalized sensors
  • clinical diagnostics
  • biomedical and environmental applications

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
A Label-Free Impedimetric Genosensor for the Nucleic Acid Amplification-Free Detection of Extracted RNA of Dengue Virus
Sensors 2020, 20(13), 3728; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20133728 - 03 Jul 2020
Abstract
Developing rapid and sensitive diagnostic methods for dengue virus (DENV) infection is of prime priority because DENV infection is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease. This work proposes an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-based genosensor for the label-free and nucleic acid amplification-free detection of [...] Read more.
Developing rapid and sensitive diagnostic methods for dengue virus (DENV) infection is of prime priority because DENV infection is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease. This work proposes an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-based genosensor for the label-free and nucleic acid amplification-free detection of extracted DENV RNA intended for a sensitive diagnosis of DENV infection. A concentration ratio of 0.04 mM 6-mercaptohexanoic acid (MHA) to 1 mM 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) was selected to modify thin-film gold electrodes as a link to control the coverage of self-designed probe DNA (pDNA) at a density of 4.5 ± 0.4 × 1011 pDNA/cm2. The pDNA/MHA/MCH-modified genosensors are proven to improve the hybridization efficiency of a synthetic 160-mer target DNA (160mtDNA) with a 140-mer electrode side overhang as compared to other MHA/MCH ratio-modified genosensors. The MHA(0.04 mM)/MCH(1 mM)-modified genosensors also present good hybridization efficiency with the extracted DENV serotype 1 (DENV1) RNA samples, having the same electrode side overhangs with the 160mtDNA, showing a low detection limit of 20 plaque forming units (PFU)/mL, a linear range of 102–105 PFU/mL and good selectivity for DENV1. The pDNA density-controlled method has great promise to construct sensitive genosensors based on the hybridization of extracted DENV nucleic acids. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Graphene-PEDOT:PSS Modified Paper-Based Aptasensor for Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Detection of Tumor Marker
Sensors 2020, 20(5), 1372; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20051372 - 02 Mar 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
A graphene and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) modified conductive paper-based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) aptasensor has been successfully fabricated by a simple and continuous coating process. A graphene/PEDOT:PSS modified paper electrode forms the nanocomposite providing a conductive and sensitive substrate for further aptamer functionalization [...] Read more.
A graphene and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) modified conductive paper-based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) aptasensor has been successfully fabricated by a simple and continuous coating process. A graphene/PEDOT:PSS modified paper electrode forms the nanocomposite providing a conductive and sensitive substrate for further aptamer functionalization of the biosensor. This low-cost paper-based aptasensor exhibits its sensitivity to carcinoembryonic antigens (CEA) in standard buffer solutions and human serum samples in a linear range of 0.77–14 ng·mL−1. The limit of detection (LOD) is found to be 0.45 ng·mL−1 and 1.06 ng·mL−1 for CEA in both samples, separately. This aptamer-based sensing device was also evaluated and received a good correlation with the immunoassay detection method. The proposed paper-based aptasensor has demonstrated its potential as a rapid simple point-of-care analytical platform for early cancer diagnosis in less developed areas where manufacturing facilities, analytical instruments, and trained specialists are limited. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Dark Field Microscopy-Based Biosensors for the Detection of E. coli in Environmental Water Samples
Sensors 2019, 19(21), 4652; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19214652 - 26 Oct 2019
Abstract
Development of sensitive methods for the determination of E. coli bacteria contamination in water distribution systems is of paramount importance to ensure the microbial safety of drinking water. This work presents a new sensing platform enabling the fast detection of bacteria in field [...] Read more.
Development of sensitive methods for the determination of E. coli bacteria contamination in water distribution systems is of paramount importance to ensure the microbial safety of drinking water. This work presents a new sensing platform enabling the fast detection of bacteria in field samples by using specific antibodies as the biorecognition element and dark field microscopy as the detection technique. The development of the sensing platform was performed using non-pathogenic bacteria, with the E. coli DH5α strain as the target, and Bacillus sp. 9727 as the negative control. The identification of the captured bacteria was made by analyzing the dark field microscopy images and screening the detected objects by using object circularity and size parameters. Specificity tests revealed the low unspecific attachment of either E. coli over human serum albumin antibodies (negative control for antibody specificity) and of Bacillus sp. over E. coli antibodies. The system performance was tested using field samples, collected from a wastewater treatment plant, and compared with two quantification techniques (i.e., Colilert-18 test and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)). The results showed comparable quantification capability. Nevertheless, the present method has the advantage of being faster, is easily adaptable to in-field analysis, and can potentially be extended to the detection of other bacterial strains. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
Microcapsule-Based Signal Amplification Method for Biomolecules
Sensors 2019, 19(12), 2711; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19122711 - 17 Jun 2019
Abstract
The direct signal amplification of target molecules could be an effective means of increasing the sensitivity and reducing the size of biosensors. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel signal amplification method suitable for the detection of biomolecules using microcapsules [...] Read more.
The direct signal amplification of target molecules could be an effective means of increasing the sensitivity and reducing the size of biosensors. The purpose of this study was to propose a novel signal amplification method suitable for the detection of biomolecules using microcapsules that can quickly respond to concentration variation. This microcapsule-based amplification method consists of two elements—microcapsules and a well-array. The microcapsules consist of (i) an inner shell fabricated through layer-by-layer assembly, (ii) a lipid bilayer, and (iii) loaded target molecules. In this method, the inner surface of the well-array was modified using TiO2 as a photocatalyst. The diameter and thickness of the fabricated micro-capsules for biomarker loading were shown to be 2.7 μm and 78 nm, respectively. An ultraviolet (UV) irradiation time of 5 min was needed when the change in optical density reached 90% saturation of the optical density change. Dye molecules were incorporated into the microcapsules and were subsequently released, and the concentration of the released solution changed in proportion with the encapsulated dye concentration. This demonstrates the proof of concept for this novel signal amplification method based on microcapsules. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Multifunctional UV and Gas Sensors Based on Vertically Nanostructured Zinc Oxide: Volume Versus Surface Effect
Sensors 2019, 19(9), 2061; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19092061 - 02 May 2019
Cited by 8
Abstract
This article reports that it is possible to make multifunctional sensing devices with ZnO infiltrated polymers while the sensing interactions could occur throughout the polymer. As such, we find that infiltrated devices with SU-8 polymer can result in highly sensitive UV sensors. Mesh [...] Read more.
This article reports that it is possible to make multifunctional sensing devices with ZnO infiltrated polymers while the sensing interactions could occur throughout the polymer. As such, we find that infiltrated devices with SU-8 polymer can result in highly sensitive UV sensors. Mesh dielectric core devices were found to make sensitive gas sensors with a better than 5 ppm sensitivity for formaldehyde and NO2. A new type of p-n junction device is further demonstrated that is sensitive to UV illumination, thus making it an enhanced UV sensor. Sensing devices relying on volume interactions, such as light absorption, can significantly benefit from the infiltrated polymer. In contrast, devices that rely on surface interactions, such as gas sensors, do not gain performance in any significant way with or without the infiltrated polymer. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Label-Free Bioelectrochemical Methods for Evaluation of Anticancer Drug Effects at a Molecular Level
Sensors 2020, 20(7), 1812; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20071812 - 25 Mar 2020
Abstract
Cancer is a multifactorial family of diseases that is still a leading cause of death worldwide. More than 100 different types of cancer affecting over 60 human organs are known. Chemotherapy plays a central role for treating cancer. The development of new anticancer [...] Read more.
Cancer is a multifactorial family of diseases that is still a leading cause of death worldwide. More than 100 different types of cancer affecting over 60 human organs are known. Chemotherapy plays a central role for treating cancer. The development of new anticancer drugs or new uses for existing drugs is an exciting and increasing research area. This is particularly important since drug resistance and side effects can limit the efficacy of the chemotherapy. Thus, there is a need for multiplexed, cost-effective, rapid, and novel screening methods that can help to elucidate the mechanism of the action of anticancer drugs and the identification of novel drug candidates. This review focuses on different label-free bioelectrochemical approaches, in particular, impedance-based methods, the solid supported membranes technique, and the DNA-based electrochemical sensor, that can be used to evaluate the effects of anticancer drugs on nucleic acids, membrane transporters, and living cells. Some relevant examples of anticancer drug interactions are presented which demonstrate the usefulness of such methods for the characterization of the mechanism of action of anticancer drugs that are targeted against various biomolecules. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop