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Special Issue "Inkjet Production of Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alessandro Paccagnella

Università degli Studi di Padova, Padua, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: microelectronic technologies; micro- and nanoelectronic devices; wearable sensors; new materials and technologies for sensing applications; biosensors; radiation sensors
Guest Editor
Dr. Giulio Rosati

Università degli Studi di Padova, Padua, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biosensors; electrochemical methods; surface functionalization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; cyclic voltammetry; inkjet sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The biosensors scenario is a continuously-growing reality that points towards the improvements to sensitivity and detection limits over the years. In the last few years, this paradigm has been changing and criteria, such as low-cost, sustainability, and device customization, are gaining more importance. Inkjet printing of electronic, electrochemical, optical devices, and sensors is a simple technology that opens the door to system personalization and dramatically reduces the concept-to-prototype time. Inkjet sensors printing permits to use affordable and peculiar substrates, such as paper, textiles, and flexible plastic sheets with both research grade and consumer printers.

The applications of inkjet-printed sensors on these substrates cover several fields, such as biomedicine, food and health, environment, and security.

In order to highlight some of the latest inkjet sensors production advances, we would like to invite you to consider submitting a manuscript to our upcoming Special Issue, “Inkjet Production of Sensors”, to be published by the end of autumn 2018. Under the expanded scope of the journal, the aim of this Special Issue is to gather a collection of papers dedicated to all aspects of inkjet-printed sensors and biosensors, with a particular emphasis on novel approaches to sensor design and architecture, signal transduction and novel applications.

We welcome submissions from any area of sensing. Both research papers and review articles will be considered. If you are interested in contributing to this Special Issue, we would very much appreciate receiving the tentative title of your contribution.

Prof. Alessandro Paccagnella
Dr. Giulio Rosati
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Inkjet
  • Paper-based sensors
  • Flexible sensors
  • Nanoparticles
  • Disposable devices
  • Plastic-based sensors
  • Electrochemical sensors
  • Plasmonics
  • Printed sensors
  • Impedance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Aerosol Jet Printed 3D Electrochemical Sensors for Protein Detection
Sensors 2018, 18(11), 3719; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18113719
Received: 10 October 2018 / Revised: 29 October 2018 / Accepted: 30 October 2018 / Published: 1 November 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4229 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of electrochemical sensors for the analysis of biological samples is nowadays widespread and highly demanded from diagnostic and pharmaceutical research, but the reliability and repeatability still remain debated issues. In the expanding field of printed electronics, Aerosol Jet Printing (AJP) appears [...] Read more.
The use of electrochemical sensors for the analysis of biological samples is nowadays widespread and highly demanded from diagnostic and pharmaceutical research, but the reliability and repeatability still remain debated issues. In the expanding field of printed electronics, Aerosol Jet Printing (AJP) appears promising to bring an improvement in resolution, miniaturization, and flexibility. In this paper, the use of AJP is proposed to design and fabricate customized electrochemical sensors in term of geometry, materials and 3D liquid sample confinement, reducing variability in the functionalization process. After an analysis of geometrical, electrical and surface features, the optimal layout has been selected. An electrochemical test has been then performed quantifying Interleukin-8, selected as reference protein, by means of Anodic Stripping Voltammetry. AJP sensors have been compared with standard screen-printed electrodes in terms of current density and relative standard deviation. Results from AJP sensors with Ag-based Anodic Stripping Voltammetry confirmed nanostructures capability to reduce the limit of detection (from 2.1 to 0.3 ng/mL). Furthermore, AJP appeared to bring an improvement in term of relative standard deviation from 50 to 10%, if compared to screen-printed sensors. This is promising to improve reliability and repeatability of measurement techniques integrable in several biotechnological applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inkjet Production of Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Experimental Characterization of Inkjet-Printed Stretchable Circuits for Wearable Sensor Applications
Sensors 2018, 18(10), 3476; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18103476
Received: 20 August 2018 / Revised: 29 September 2018 / Accepted: 11 October 2018 / Published: 16 October 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (13407 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This paper introduces a cost-effective method for the fabrication of stretchable circuits on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using inkjet printing of silver nanoparticle ink. The fabrication method, presented here, allows for the development of fully stretchable and wearable sensors. Inkjet-printed sinusoidal and horseshoe patterns are [...] Read more.
This paper introduces a cost-effective method for the fabrication of stretchable circuits on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using inkjet printing of silver nanoparticle ink. The fabrication method, presented here, allows for the development of fully stretchable and wearable sensors. Inkjet-printed sinusoidal and horseshoe patterns are experimentally characterized in terms of the effect of their geometry on stretchability, while maintaining adequate electrical conductivity. The optimal fabricated circuit, with a horseshoe pattern at an angle of 45°, is capable of undergoing an axial stretch up to a strain of 25% with a resistance under 800 Ω. The conductivity of the circuit is fully reversible once it is returned to its pre-stretching state. The circuit could also undergo up to 3000 stretching cycles without exhibiting a significant change in its conductivity. In addition, the successful development of a novel inkjet-printed fully stretchable and wearable version of the conventional pulse oximeter is demonstrated. Finally, the resulting sensor is evaluated in comparison to its commercially available counterpart. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inkjet Production of Sensors)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Floating Gate, Organic Field-Effect Transistor-Based Sensors towards Biomedical Applications Fabricated with Large-Area Processes over Flexible Substrates
Sensors 2018, 18(3), 688; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18030688
Received: 5 February 2018 / Revised: 15 February 2018 / Accepted: 20 February 2018 / Published: 26 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1766 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Organic Field-Effect Transistors (OFETs) are attracting a rising interest for the development of novel kinds of sensing platforms. In this paper, we report about a peculiar sensor device structure, namely Organic Charge-Modulated Field-Effect Transistor (OCMFET), capable of operating at low voltages and entirely [...] Read more.
Organic Field-Effect Transistors (OFETs) are attracting a rising interest for the development of novel kinds of sensing platforms. In this paper, we report about a peculiar sensor device structure, namely Organic Charge-Modulated Field-Effect Transistor (OCMFET), capable of operating at low voltages and entirely fabricated with large-area techniques, i.e., inkjet printing and chemical vapor deposition, that can be easily upscaled to an industrial size. Device fabrication is described, and statistical characterization of the basic electronic parameters is reported. As an effective benchmark for the application of large-area fabricated OCMFET to the biomedical field, its combination with pyroelectric materials and compressible capacitors is discussed, in order to employ the proposed device as a temperature pressure sensor. The obtained sensors are capable to operate in conditions which are relevant in the biomedical field (temperature in the range of 18.5–50 °C, pressure in the range of 102–103 Pa) with reproducible and valuable performances, opening the way for the fabrication of low-cost, flexible sensing platforms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inkjet Production of Sensors)
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