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Special Issue "Guided-Wave Acoustic Sensors"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Victor Giurgiutiu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dr. Md Yeasin Bhuiyan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
SHM Engineer, Collins Aerospace (A United Technologies Company), Vergennes, VT, USA
Interests: structural health monitoring; applied mechanics; physics-based modeling; sensors; wave propagation
Dr. Mohammad Faisal Haider
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Structures and Composites Laboratory, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Interests: multi-functional composites; multi-functional intelligent structures; structural health monitoring; battery health monitoring; machine learning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Guided-wave acoustic sensors can be small, inexpensive, sensitive, and have the capability of a multitude of measurements depending on their design and manufacturing. They can be used for on-demand, guided-wave structural interrogation; acoustic emission detection; and the measurement of temperature, pressure, and torque. Acoustic wave sensors are made of various piezoelectric materials such as quartz (SiO2); lead zirconium titanate (PZT); and, to a lesser degree, lithium niobate (LiNbO3), aluminium nitride (AlN), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), etc. Each has specific advantages and disadvantages, which include cost, temperature dependence, attenuation, and propagation velocity. Acoustic wave sensors are extremely versatile and have huge commercial potential. This Special Issue serves to explore state-of-the-art acoustic wave sensors for various types of guided-wave detection; acoustic emission detection; and/or innovative applications, commercial or industrial applications, the fabrication of sensors, sensor materials, etc. Papers dealing with but not limited to one or several of the following aspects will be considered for publication:

  • Theory, modeling, and simulation;
  • Novel applications of guided-wave sensors;
  • Guided-wave actuation and detection;
  • The fabrication of acoustic sensors;
  • Acoustic sensor materials;
  • Acoustic sensors for industrial and commercial applications;
  • Harsh environment acoustic sensors;
  • Acoustic sensors for damage or impact detection;
  • Guided-wave damage interaction detection;
  • Wave propagation detection and sensitivity analysis;
  • Acoustic sensors for innovative applications.

Prof. Dr. Victor Giurgiutiu
Dr. Md Yeasin Bhuiyan
Dr. Mohammad Faisal Haider
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • acoustic sensors
  • guided wave propagation
  • signal analysis
  • design and fabrication
  • novel applications

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Mobile Acoustic Wave Platform Deployment in the Amazon River: Impact of the Water Sample on the Love Wave Sensor Response
Sensors 2020, 20(1), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20010072 - 21 Dec 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 979
Abstract
This paper presents an experimental platform allowing in situ measurement in an aqueous medium using an acoustic Love wave sensor. The aim of this platform, which includes the sensor, a test cell for electrical connections, a microfluidic chip, and a readout electronic circuit, [...] Read more.
This paper presents an experimental platform allowing in situ measurement in an aqueous medium using an acoustic Love wave sensor. The aim of this platform, which includes the sensor, a test cell for electrical connections, a microfluidic chip, and a readout electronic circuit, is to realize a first estimation of water quality without transportation of water samples from the field to the laboratory as a medium-term objective. In the first step, to validate the ability of such a platform to operate in the field and in Amazonian water, an isolated and difficult-to-access location, namely, the floodplain Logo Do Curuaï in the Brazilian Amazon, was chosen. The ability of such a platform to be transported, installed on site, and used is discussed in terms of user friendliness and versatility. The response of the Love wave sensor to in situ water samples is estimated according to the physical parameters of Amazonian water. Finally, the very good quality of the acoustic response is established, potential further improvements are discussed, and the paper is concluded. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Guided-Wave Acoustic Sensors)
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Article
Impact Localisation in Composite Plates of Different Stiffness Impactors under Simulated Environmental and Operational Conditions
Sensors 2019, 19(17), 3659; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19173659 - 22 Aug 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1312 | Correction
Abstract
A parametric investigation of the effect of impactor stiffness as well as environmental and operational conditions on impact contact behaviour and the subsequently generated lamb waves in composite structures is presented. It is shown that differing impactor stiffness generates the most significant changes [...] Read more.
A parametric investigation of the effect of impactor stiffness as well as environmental and operational conditions on impact contact behaviour and the subsequently generated lamb waves in composite structures is presented. It is shown that differing impactor stiffness generates the most significant changes in contact area and lamb wave characteristics (waveform, frequency, and amplitude). A novel impact localisation method was developed based on the above observations that allows for variations due to differences in impactor stiffness based on modifications of the reference database method and the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) time of arrival (ToA) picker. The proposed method was compared against a benchmark method based on artificial neural networks (ANNS) and the normalised smoothed envelope threshold (NSET) ToA extraction method. The results indicate that the proposed method had comparable accuracy to the benchmark method for hard impacts under various environmental and operational conditions when trained only using a single hard impact case. However, when tested with soft impacts, the benchmark method had very low accuracy, whilst the proposed method was able to maintain its accuracy at an acceptable level. Thus, the proposed method is capable of detecting the location of impacts of varying stiffness under various environmental and operational conditions using data from only a single impact case, which brings it closer to the application of data driven impact detection systems in real life structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Guided-Wave Acoustic Sensors)
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Article
A Guided Wave Transducer with Sprayed Magnetostrictive Powder Coating for Monitoring of Aluminum Conductor Steel-Reinforced Cables
Sensors 2019, 19(7), 1550; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19071550 - 30 Mar 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1407
Abstract
Aluminum conductor steel-reinforced (ACSR) cables are typically used in overhead transmission lines, requiring stringent non-destructive testing owing to the severe conditions they face. Ultrasonic guided wave inspection provides promising online monitoring of the wire breakage of cables with the advantages of high sensitivity, [...] Read more.
Aluminum conductor steel-reinforced (ACSR) cables are typically used in overhead transmission lines, requiring stringent non-destructive testing owing to the severe conditions they face. Ultrasonic guided wave inspection provides promising online monitoring of the wire breakage of cables with the advantages of high sensitivity, long-range inspection, and full cross-sectional coverage. It is a very popular method to generate and receive guided waves using magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers. However, uniformly coupling the acoustic energy excited by transducers into multi-wire structures is always a challenge in the field application of guided waves. Long-term field application of piezoelectric transducers is limited due to the small coupling surface area, localized excitation, and couplant required. Conventional magnetostrictive transducers for steel strand inspection are based on the magnetostrictive effect of the material itself. Two factors affect the transducing performance of the transducers on ACSR cables. On one hand, there is a non-magnetostrictive effect in aluminum wires. On the other hand, the magnetostriction of the innermost steel wires is too weak to generate guided waves. The bias magnetic field is attenuated by the outer layers of aluminum wires. In this paper, an alternative sprayed magnetostrictive powder coating (SMPC) transducer was developed for guided wave generation and detection in ACSR cables. The Fe83Ga17 alloy powder with large magnetostriction was sprayed uniformly on the surfaces of certain sections of the outermost aluminum wires where the transducer would be installed. Experimental investigations were carried out to generate and receive the most commonly used L(0,1) guided waves for wire breakage detection at frequencies of 50 and 100 kHz. The results demonstrate that the discernable reflected waves of the cable end and an artificial defect of three-wire breakage (5.5% reduction in the cable’s cross-sectional area) were received by the transducer with SMPC, which was impossible for the transducer without SMPC. This method makes long-term and online monitoring of ACSR cables feasible due to the high coupling efficiency and good structural surface adaptability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Guided-Wave Acoustic Sensors)
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Review

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Review
Review of Structural Health Monitoring Methods Regarding a Multi-Sensor Approach for Damage Assessment of Metal and Composite Structures
Sensors 2020, 20(3), 826; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20030826 - 04 Feb 2020
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 3653
Abstract
Structural health monitoring (SHM) is the continuous on-board monitoring of a structure’s condition during operation by integrated systems of sensors. SHM is believed to have the potential to increase the safety of the structure while reducing its deadweight and downtime. Numerous SHM methods [...] Read more.
Structural health monitoring (SHM) is the continuous on-board monitoring of a structure’s condition during operation by integrated systems of sensors. SHM is believed to have the potential to increase the safety of the structure while reducing its deadweight and downtime. Numerous SHM methods exist that allow the observation and assessment of different damages of different kinds of structures. Recently data fusion on different levels has been getting attention for joint damage evaluation by different SHM methods to achieve increased assessment accuracy and reliability. However, little attention is given to the question of which SHM methods are promising to combine. The current article addresses this issue by demonstrating the theoretical capabilities of a number of prominent SHM methods by comparing their fundamental physical models to the actual effects of damage on metal and composite structures. Furthermore, an overview of the state-of-the-art damage assessment concepts for different levels of SHM is given. As a result, dynamic SHM methods using ultrasonic waves and vibrations appear to be very powerful but suffer from their sensitivity to environmental influences. Combining such dynamic methods with static strain-based or conductivity-based methods and with additional sensors for environmental entities might yield a robust multi-sensor SHM approach. For demonstration, a potent system of sensors is defined and a possible joint data evaluation scheme for a multi-sensor SHM approach is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Guided-Wave Acoustic Sensors)
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