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Fluorescence and Chemical Luminescence Sensors

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 11137

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Applied Physics “Nello Carrara”, CNR-IFAC, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
Interests: biosensors; biophotonics; fluorescence; label-free
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry “Giacomo Ciamician”, University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna, Italy
Interests: optical biosensors; chemiluminescence biosensors; chemosensors; paper-based devices
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together researchers active in the development of chemo- and biosensors based on fluorescence and general luminescence technologies, methods, or protocols.

Optical sensors (chemo- and biosensors) are analytical tools that have successful applications in many fields, from clinical diagnostics and life science to food safety and environmental monitoring. Work on classical methods or assay formats are welcome in this Special Issue, as well as those based on innovative techniques such as new materials, advanced optical setup, innovative chemical and biochemical receptors and/or luminescence reporters for increased specificity and sensitivity, new assay design, innovative detection principles, microfluidics, and integrated systems. Manuscripts on overcoming challenges, related, for example, to the real-world application of fluorescence and chemical luminescence chemo- and biosensors are also appreciated.

We cordially invite you to share, in the form of articles or reviews, you expertise and insights with the sensor research community.

Dr. Ambra Giannetti
Prof. Dr. Mara Mirasoli
Dr. Sara Tombelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biosensors
  • real applications
  • optical biosensors
  • fluorescence
  • chemiluminescence
  • bioluminescence
  • electrochemiluminescence
  • chemical sensors
  • chemical and biochemical receptors

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

8 pages, 3192 KiB  
Communication
A Flexible Chemosensor Based on Colorimetric and Fluorescent Dual Modes for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Hypochlorite Anion
by Qin Wu, Tao Tao, Yunxia Zhao and Wei Huang
Sensors 2021, 21(23), 8082; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21238082 - 3 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2274
Abstract
A flexible chemosensor has been developed based on colorimetric and fluorescent dual modes using tetraphenylethylene-centered tetraaniline (TPE4A) for rapid and sensitive detection of hypochlorite anion. The fluorescent probe TPE4A exhibits a unique aggregation-induced emission (AIE) character which is proved by a [...] Read more.
A flexible chemosensor has been developed based on colorimetric and fluorescent dual modes using tetraphenylethylene-centered tetraaniline (TPE4A) for rapid and sensitive detection of hypochlorite anion. The fluorescent probe TPE4A exhibits a unique aggregation-induced emission (AIE) character which is proved by a blue shift of the fluorescent peak from 544 to 474 nm with the water equivalents increasing. With the addition of hypochlorite in solution, the absorbance of the probe changes and the responding fluorescence color can be observed to change from light green to purple. The detection limit of hypochlorite is 1.80 × 10−4 M in solution, and the visual detection limit is 1.27 µg/cm2 with the naked eye for the flexible paper-based chemosensor. The proposed flexible chemosensors show a good selectivity and sensitivity which has great potential for effective detection of hypochlorite anions without any spectroscopic instrumentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence and Chemical Luminescence Sensors)
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11 pages, 2813 KiB  
Communication
Development of Lectin Modified Fluorescent Magnetic Particles for Highly Sensitive Detection of Glycoconjugates
by Yoshio Suzuki
Sensors 2021, 21(16), 5512; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21165512 - 17 Aug 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2165
Abstract
I conducted this study to develop an improved method for glycome detection using fluorescent magnetic beads, whose surfaces were modified using lectins, for the highly sensitive detection of saccharides or glycoproteins via fluorescence quenching using a novel fluorescence emitter and quencher pair. The [...] Read more.
I conducted this study to develop an improved method for glycome detection using fluorescent magnetic beads, whose surfaces were modified using lectins, for the highly sensitive detection of saccharides or glycoproteins via fluorescence quenching using a novel fluorescence emitter and quencher pair. The emitter (Cy3 fluorophore) was incorporated into magnetic beads, and a fluorescence quencher (cyanopyranyl group) was bound to glycomes via covalent bonding. The fluorescence intensities of fluorescent magnetic beads containing lectins decreased specifically in the presence of glycomes, which was a result of fluorescence quenching from Cy3 to cyanopyranyl groups due to the formation of a stable complex between lectins and glycome. Fluorescence intensities were plotted as a function of glycoprotein concentration, and good linear relationships were observed. This method enabled the fluorescent reading-out of a series of lectin-glycome interactions on the basis of recognition selectivity and affinity of immobilized lectins without tedious washing processes. Moreover, a simple profiling process was performed using this assay for diverse glycoconjugates, which not only included simple saccharides but also glycoproteins and glycome in cell lysates. These results clearly indicate that the combination of magnetic beads with the novel emitter-quencher pair enabled the highly sensitive detection of lectin-glycome interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence and Chemical Luminescence Sensors)
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13 pages, 3236 KiB  
Article
Integration of 3D Hydrodynamic Focused Microreactor with Microfluidic Chemiluminescence Sensing for Online Synthesis and Catalytical Characterization of Gold Nanoparticles
by Yanwei Wang and Michael Seidel
Sensors 2021, 21(7), 2290; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21072290 - 25 Mar 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2231
Abstract
Chemiluminescence assays have shown great advantages compared with other optical techniques. Gold nanoparticles have drawn much attention in chemiluminescence analysis systems as an enzyme-free catalyst. The catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles for chemiluminescence sensing depends on size, shape and the surface charge property, [...] Read more.
Chemiluminescence assays have shown great advantages compared with other optical techniques. Gold nanoparticles have drawn much attention in chemiluminescence analysis systems as an enzyme-free catalyst. The catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles for chemiluminescence sensing depends on size, shape and the surface charge property, which is hard to characterize in batches. As there is no positive or negative correlation between chemiluminescence signals and sizes of gold nanoparticles, the best way to get optimal gold nanoparticles is to control the reaction conditions via online chemiluminescence sensing systems. Therefore, a new method was developed for online synthesis of gold nanoparticles with a three-dimension hydrodynamic focusing microreactor, directly coupled with a microfluidic chemiluminescence sensing chip, which was coupled to a charge-coupled device camera for direct catalytical characterization of gold nanoparticles. All operations were performed in an automatic way with a program controlled by Matlab. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized through a single-phase reaction using glucose as a reducing agent and stabilizer at room temperature. The property of gold nanoparticles was easily controlled with the three-dimension microreactor during synthesis. The catalyst property of synthesized gold nanoparticles was characterized in a luminol–NaOCl chemiluminescence system. After optimizing parameters of synthesis, the chemiluminescence signal was enhanced to a factor of 171. The gold nanoparticles synthesized under optimal conditions for the luminol–NaOCl system were stable for at least one month. To further investigate the catalytic activity of synthesized gold nanoparticles in various situations, two methods were used to change the property of gold nanoparticles. After adding a certain amount of salt (NaCl), gold nanoparticles aggregated with a changed surface charge property and the catalytic activity was greatly enhanced. Glutathione was used as an example of molecules with thiol groups which interact with gold nanoparticles and reduce the catalytic activity. The chemiluminescence intensity was reduced by 98.9%. Therefore, we could show that using a microreactor for gold nanoparticles synthesis and direct coupling with microfluidic chemiluminescence sensing offers a promising monitoring method to find the best synthesis condition of gold nanoparticles for catalytic activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence and Chemical Luminescence Sensors)
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10 pages, 6068 KiB  
Communication
Software for Matching Standard Activity Enzyme Biosensors for Soil Pollution Analysis
by Valentina A. Kratasyuk, Elizaveta M. Kolosova, Oleg S. Sutormin, Viktoriya I. Lonshakova-Mukina, Matvey M. Baygin, Nadezhda V. Rimatskaya, Irina E. Sukovataya and Alexander A. Shpedt
Sensors 2021, 21(3), 1017; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21031017 - 2 Feb 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3441
Abstract
This work is dedicated to developing enzyme biosensor software to solve problems regarding soil pollution analysis. An algorithm and specialised software have been developed which stores, analyses and visualises data using JavaScript programming language. The developed software is based on matching data of [...] Read more.
This work is dedicated to developing enzyme biosensor software to solve problems regarding soil pollution analysis. An algorithm and specialised software have been developed which stores, analyses and visualises data using JavaScript programming language. The developed software is based on matching data of 51 non-commercial standard soil samples and their inhibitory effects on three enzyme systems of varying complexity. This approach is able to identify the influence of chemical properties soil samples, without toxic agents, on enzyme biosensors. Such software may find wide use in environmental monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence and Chemical Luminescence Sensors)
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