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Special Issue "New Methods and Applications of Nondestructive Testing in Close Ranging"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Juan V. Sánchez-Pérez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Av. de los Naranjos s/n, Valencia 46022, Spain
Interests: Use of ultrasounds and photogrammetry in nondestructive testing; Application to pictorial artworks.
Dr. Fernando Buchón Moragues
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Geodésica, Cartográfica y Topográfica, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera, s/n, 46022 Valencia, España
Interests: close-range photogrammetry applied to medicine, art, industry, and heritage; laser scanner; virtual representations; archeology
Dr. Tomás Gómez Álvarez-Arenas
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid, Spain
Interests: optimization and design of ultrasonic transducers (air-coupled, ferroelectret, arrays, etc.); characterization of piezoelectric materials; ultrasound propagation in complex media, composite materials, and biomaterials; use of ultrasonic techniques for materials characterization; ultrasonic NDT; medical application of ultrasonic techniques for diagnosis; industrial application of ultrasonic techniques for quality control; metaheuristics for optimization and inverse problem solutions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to present the call for papers for the launch of a Special Issue of Sensors the MDPI journal devoted to "new methods and applications of nondestructive testing in close ranging". The topics included in this Issue refer to the development of new methodologies for nondestructive analysis in close ranging, including techniques based on ultrasounds, photogrammetry, or radar, and new applications in construction, art and heritage, medicine, industry, and processes.

Prof. Juan V. Sánchez-Pérez
Dr. Fernando Buchón Moragues
Dr. Tomás Gómez Álvarez-Arenas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nondestructive testing
  • close ranging
  • construction
  • art and heritage
  • medicine
  • industry and processes

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Application of Phase-Reversal Fresnel Zone Plates for Improving The Elevation Resolution in Ultrasonic Testing with Phased Arrays
Sensors 2019, 19(23), 5080; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19235080 (registering DOI) - 21 Nov 2019
Abstract
Currently, phased arrays have found wide application in ultrasonic nondestructive testing. Volumetric results provided by the Full article
Open AccessArticle
Estimation of the Precision of a Structured Light System in Oil Paintings on Canvas
Sensors 2019, 19(22), 4966; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19224966 - 14 Nov 2019
Abstract
The conservation and authentication of pictorial artworks is considered an important part of the preservation of cultural heritage. The use of non-destructive testing allows the obtention of accurate information about the state of pictorial artworks without direct contact between the equipment used and [...] Read more.
The conservation and authentication of pictorial artworks is considered an important part of the preservation of cultural heritage. The use of non-destructive testing allows the obtention of accurate information about the state of pictorial artworks without direct contact between the equipment used and the sample. In particular, the use of this kind of technology is recommended in obtaining three-dimensional surface digital models, as it provides high-resolution information that constitutes a kind of fingerprint of the samples. In the case of pictorial artworks with some kind of surface relief, one of the most useful technologies is structured light (SL). In this paper, the minimum difference in height that can be distinguished with this technology was estimated, establishing experimentally both the error committed in the measurement process and the precision in the use of this technology. This study focused on the case of oil paintings on canvas and developed a low-cost system to ensure its wide use. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Integrated Photogrammetric-Acoustic Technique for Qualitative Analysis of the Performance of Acoustic Screens in Sandy Soils
Sensors 2019, 19(22), 4881; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19224881 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
In this work, we present an integrated photogrammetric-acoustic technique that, together with the construction of a scaled wind tunnel, allows us to experimentally analyze the permeability behavior of a new type of acoustic screen based on a material called sonic crystal. Acoustic screens [...] Read more.
In this work, we present an integrated photogrammetric-acoustic technique that, together with the construction of a scaled wind tunnel, allows us to experimentally analyze the permeability behavior of a new type of acoustic screen based on a material called sonic crystal. Acoustic screens are devices used to reduce noise, mostly due to communication infrastructures, in its transmission phase from the source to the receiver. The main constructive difference between these new screens and the classic ones is that the first ones are formed by arrays of acoustic scatterers while the second ones are formed by continuous walls. This implies that, due to their geometry, screens based on sonic crystals are permeable to wind and water, unlike the classic ones. This fact may allow the use of these new screens in sandy soils, where sand would pass through the screen, avoiding the formation of sand dunes that are formed in classic screens and drastically reducing their acoustic performance. In this work, the movement of the sand and the resulting acoustic attenuation in these new screens are analyzed qualitatively, comparing the results with those obtained with the classic ones, and obtaining interesting results from the acoustic point of view. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Phase Method for Visualization of Hidden Dielectric Objects in the Millimeter Waveband
Sensors 2019, 19(18), 3919; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19183919 - 11 Sep 2019
Abstract
A method of detecting dielectric objects hidden behind an opaque barrier located on a reflective background, based on the distortion of interference fringes, is proposed in this article. Experiments conducted in the millimeter wavelength range demonstrated the effectiveness of the method under consideration, [...] Read more.
A method of detecting dielectric objects hidden behind an opaque barrier located on a reflective background, based on the distortion of interference fringes, is proposed in this article. Experiments conducted in the millimeter wavelength range demonstrated the effectiveness of the method under consideration, which does not require a holographic image reconstruction. Such a system can be classified as contour imaging. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study of Fluid-Solid Coupling-Based Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Detection of Stomata Defect of Lithium-Ion Battery
Sensors 2019, 19(10), 2391; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19102391 - 25 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Aiming at the characteristics of the periodic stacking structure of a lithium-ion battery core and the corresponding relationship between the air-coupled ultrasonic transmission initial wave and the wave propagation mode in each layer medium of a lithium-ion battery, the homogenized finite element model [...] Read more.
Aiming at the characteristics of the periodic stacking structure of a lithium-ion battery core and the corresponding relationship between the air-coupled ultrasonic transmission initial wave and the wave propagation mode in each layer medium of a lithium-ion battery, the homogenized finite element model of a lithium-ion battery was developed based on the theory of pressure acoustics and solid mechanics. This model provided a reliable method and basis for solving the visualization of ultrasonic propagation in a lithium-ion battery and the analysis of ultrasonic time-frequency domain characteristics. The finite element simulation analysis and experimental verification of a lithium-ion battery with a near-surface stomata defect, near-bottom stomata defect and middle-layer stomata defect were performed. The results showed that the air-coupled ultrasonic transmission signal can effectively characterize the stomata defect inside a lithium-ion battery. The energy of an air-coupled ultrasonic transmission signal is concentrated between 350–450 kHz, and the acoustic diffraction effect has an important influence on the effect of the ultrasonic and stomata defect. Based on the amplitude response characteristics of the air-coupled ultrasonic transmission wave in the stomata defect area, a C-scan of the lithium-ion battery was performed. The C-scan result verified that air-coupled ultrasonic testing technology can accurately and effectively detect the pre-embedded stomata defect and natural stomata defect in a lithium-ion battery, which is able to promote and expand the application of the technology in the field of electric energy security. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Air-Coupled and Resonant Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Technique
Sensors 2019, 19(10), 2221; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19102221 - 14 May 2019
Abstract
An ultrasonic, resonant, pulse-echo, and air-coupled nondestructive testing (NDT) technique is presented. It is intended for components, with regular geometries where it is possible to excite resonant modes, made of materials that have a high acoustic impedance (Z) and low attenuation [...] Read more.
An ultrasonic, resonant, pulse-echo, and air-coupled nondestructive testing (NDT) technique is presented. It is intended for components, with regular geometries where it is possible to excite resonant modes, made of materials that have a high acoustic impedance (Z) and low attenuation coefficient (α). Under these conditions, these resonances will present a very large quality factor (Q) and decay time (τ). This feature is used to avoid the dead zone, produced by the echo coming from the first wall, by receiving the resonant echo from the whole specimen over a longer period of time. This echo is analyzed in the frequency domain to determine specimen resonant frequency, which can be further used to determine either velocity or thickness. Using wideband air-coupled transducers, we tested the technique on plates (steel, aluminum, and silicone rubber) by exciting the mode of the first thickness. As expected, the higher the Z and the lower the α, the better the technique performed. Sensitivity to deviations of the angle of incidence away from normal (±2°) and the possibility to generate shear waves were also studied. Then, it was tested on steel cylindrical pipes that had different wall thicknesses and diameters. Finally, the use of this technique to generate C-Scan images of steel plates with different thicknesses was demonstrated. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Fully Noncontact Hybrid NDT for 3D Defect Reconstruction Using SAFT Algorithm and 2D Apodization Window
Sensors 2019, 19(9), 2138; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19092138 - 08 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Nondestructive testing of metallic objects that may contain embedded defects of different sizes is an important application in many industrial branches for quality control. Most of these techniques allow defect detection and its approximate localization, but few methods give enough information for its [...] Read more.
Nondestructive testing of metallic objects that may contain embedded defects of different sizes is an important application in many industrial branches for quality control. Most of these techniques allow defect detection and its approximate localization, but few methods give enough information for its 3D reconstruction. Here we present a hybrid laser–transducer system that combines remote, laser-generated ultrasound excitation and noncontact ultrasonic transducer detection. This fully noncontact method allows access to scan areas on different object’s faces and defect details from different angles/perspectives. This hybrid system can analyze the object’s volume data and allows a 3D reconstruction image of the embedded defects. As a novelty for signal processing improvement, we use a 2D apodization window filtering technique, applied along with the synthetic aperture focusing algorithm, to remove the undesired effects due to side lobes and wide-angle reflections of propagating ultrasound waves, thus enhancing the resulting 3D image of the defect. Finally, we provide both qualitative and quantitative volumetric results that yield valuable information about defect location and size. Full article
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