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Special Issue "Biosensor and Bioelectronics for Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Eileen Yu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
Interests: bioelectrochemical systems; resource recovery; environmental engineering; electrochemical engineering and materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Samet Şahin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Bioengineering, Bilecik Şeyh Edebali University, 11230 Merkez/BİLECİK, Turkey
Interests: enzymatic biofuel cell; biosensors; bioelectronics; modified electrodes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensors have become more and more important due to their essential role in the detection of various physiological markers for biomedical research. They can be highly specific, able to work in different physical parameters depending on the design, and reusable. These unique advantages of biosensors have attracted many researchers to develop different innovative strategies, such as point-of-care detection and wearable and implantable systems. The emerging field of bioelectronics, on the other hand, explores the relationship between biology and electronics for applications such as powering microelectronic systems, information processing, and storage using biological fuel cells, bionics, and biomaterials.

In this context, biosensor and bioelectronic systems play a crucial role in the diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases, and healthcare applications. There are challenges, particularly specificity, sensitivity, selectivity, and stability of the devices in need of advanced approaches and technologies. For final products, simplicity, adaptability, and integration are also critical issues.

This Special Issue is devoted to exploring new approaches, solutions, and applications in biosensor and bioelectronics for biomedical applications. We would like to invite you to contribute with original research papers, as well as comprehensive reviews (subject to editorial pre-approval), focusing on biosensing and bioelectronic solutions in biomedical applications. Contributions to address certain issues in biomedical applications might include but not limited to following topics:

  • Electrochemical biosensors
  • Optic based biosensors
  • Point-of-care biosensing
  • Immunosensors
  • DNA biosensors
  • Wearable biosensor and bioelectronics
  • Lab-on-chip bioelectronics
  • Self-powered bioelectronics
  • Biomaterials for biosensor and bioelectronics

Dr. Eileen Yu
Dr. Samet Şahin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Article
Kinetic Exclusion Assay of Biomolecules by Aptamer Capture
Sensors 2020, 20(12), 3442; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20123442 - 18 Jun 2020
Viewed by 804
Abstract
DNA aptamers are short nucleotide oligomers selected to bind a target ligand with affinity and specificity rivaling that of antibodies. These remarkable features recommend aptamers as candidates for analytical and therapeutic applications that traditionally use antibodies as biorecognition elements. Numerous traditional and emerging [...] Read more.
DNA aptamers are short nucleotide oligomers selected to bind a target ligand with affinity and specificity rivaling that of antibodies. These remarkable features recommend aptamers as candidates for analytical and therapeutic applications that traditionally use antibodies as biorecognition elements. Numerous traditional and emerging analytical techniques have been proposed and successfully implemented to utilize aptamers for sensing purposes. In this work, we exploited the analytical capabilities offered by the kinetic exclusion assay technology to measure the affinity of fluorescent aptamers for their thrombin target and quantify the concentration of analyte in solution. Standard binding curves constructed by using equilibrated mixtures of aptamers titrated with thrombin were fitted with a 1:1 binding model and provided an effective Kd of the binding in the sub-nanomolar range. However, our experimental results suggest that this simple model does not satisfactorily describe the binding process; therefore, the possibility that the aptamer is composed of a mixture of two or more distinct Kd populations is discussed. The same standard curves, together with a four-parameter logistic equation, were used to determine “unknown” concentrations of thrombin in mock samples. The ability to identify and characterize complex binding stoichiometry, together with the determination of target analyte concentrations in the pM–nM range, supports the adoption of this technology for kinetics, equilibrium, and analytical purposes by employing aptamers as biorecognition elements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensor and Bioelectronics for Biomedical Applications)
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