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Special Issue "Advanced Micro and Nano Technologies for Gas Sensing"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alvise Bagolini

Guest Editor
Micro-Nano Facility, Centre for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 30123 Trento, Italy
Interests: microfabrication; micro electromechanical technology platforms for radio frequency switches; ultrasonic transducers; inertial sensors; gas sensors; microactuators and manipulators
Dr. Andrea Gaiardo

Guest Editor
Micro-Nano Facility, Centre for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 30123 Trento, Italy
Interests: gas sensors; nanostructured material synthesis; material characterizations; microfabrication process; thin and thick film depositions
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonino Picciotto
Website
Guest Editor
Micro-Nano Facility, Centre for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 30123 Trento, Italy
Interests: microfabrication; high energy physics; nanomaterials; advanced materials for particle acceleration and laser-induced nuclear fusion reactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of innovative devices for the monitoring of gaseous molecules is receiving a strong boost in recent years for many applications in both existing and new markets, including indoor and outdoor air quality monitoring, analysis and diagnosis of clinical disease with non-invasive methods, and safety in the workplace. Thus, gas sensing is a key monitoring technology, and it is under continuous development both in industry and research. Small and low consumption sensors are necessary to enable mobile and wearable electronics applications, as well as diffused monitoring compatible with the IoT world. Therefore, sensor miniaturization using micro- and nanofabrication technologies appears as the main road to develop the next generation of gas sensors. Microfabrication is well established and already employed for a range of gas sensors, but new processes are under development to enhance performance and cmos compatibility. Nanofabrication offers the possibility to dramatically enhance the capability of gas sensors, but its integration with microfabrication is still a challenge.

This Special Issue will cover innovative research on micro and nanotechnologies for the development of gas sensors. Relevant reviews and original research articles for this issue will focus on:

  • Simulation, design, and fabrication of advanced sensors with improvements in miniaturization, low consumption, and performance;
  • Nanomaterials for gas sensing, including properties, advances in synthesis and growth, fabrication technologies, and surface functionalization techniques;
  • New key enabling technologies and device integration concepts for gas sensing, in situ, and in operando measurements.

Dr. Alvise Bagolini
Dr. Andrea Gaiardo
Dr. Antonino Picciotto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental gas sensors
  • Chemical sensors
  • Micro and nanodevices 
  • Nanostructured materials for gas sensing
  • Indoor and outdoor gas detection
  • Micro and nanofabrication processes
  • surface functionalization
  • Semiconductor-based gas sensors
  • Toxic gas detection
  • Micro and nanodevices for medical applications
  • Integrated sensors
  • Microfluidics for gas sensing

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Growth Mechanisms of ZnO Micro-Nanomorphologies and Their Role in Enhancing Gas Sensing Properties
Sensors 2021, 21(4), 1331; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21041331 - 13 Feb 2021
Viewed by 255
Abstract
Zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the main functional materials used to realize chemiresistive gas sensors. In addition, ZnO can be grown through many different methods obtaining the widest family of unique morphologies. However, the relationship between the ZnO morphologies and their gas [...] Read more.
Zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the main functional materials used to realize chemiresistive gas sensors. In addition, ZnO can be grown through many different methods obtaining the widest family of unique morphologies. However, the relationship between the ZnO morphologies and their gas sensing properties needs more detailed investigations, also with the aim to improve the sensor performances. In this work, seven nanoforms (such as leaves, bisphenoids, flowers, needles, etc.) were prepared through simple wet chemical synthesis. Morphological and structural characterizations were performed to figure out their growth mechanisms. Then, the obtained powders were deposited through screen-printing technique to realize thick film gas sensors. The gas sensing behavior was tested toward some traditional target gases and some volatile organic compounds (acetone, acetaldehyde, etc.) and compared with ZnO morphologies. Results showed a direct correlation between the sensors responses and the powders features (morphology and size), which depend on the specific synthesis process. The sensors can be divided in two behavioral classes, following the two main morphology kinds: aggregates of nanocrystals (leaves and bisphenoids), exhibiting best performances versus all tested gases and monocrystal based (stars, needle, long needles, flowers, and prisms). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Micro and Nano Technologies for Gas Sensing)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimization of a Low-Power Chemoresistive Gas Sensor: Predictive Thermal Modelling and Mechanical Failure Analysis
Sensors 2021, 21(3), 783; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21030783 - 25 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 380
Abstract
The substrate plays a key role in chemoresistive gas sensors. It acts as mechanical support for the sensing material, hosts the heating element and, also, aids the sensing material in signal transduction. In recent years, a significant improvement in the substrate production process [...] Read more.
The substrate plays a key role in chemoresistive gas sensors. It acts as mechanical support for the sensing material, hosts the heating element and, also, aids the sensing material in signal transduction. In recent years, a significant improvement in the substrate production process has been achieved, thanks to the advances in micro- and nanofabrication for micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technologies. In addition, the use of innovative materials and smaller low-power consumption silicon microheaters led to the development of high-performance gas sensors. Various heater layouts were investigated to optimize the temperature distribution on the membrane, and a suspended membrane configuration was exploited to avoid heat loss by conduction through the silicon bulk. However, there is a lack of comprehensive studies focused on predictive models for the optimization of the thermal and mechanical properties of a microheater. In this work, three microheater layouts in three membrane sizes were developed using the microfabrication process. The performance of these devices was evaluated to predict their thermal and mechanical behaviors by using both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, a statistical method was employed to cross-correlate the thermal predictive model and the mechanical failure analysis, aiming at microheater design optimization for gas-sensing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Micro and Nano Technologies for Gas Sensing)
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Open AccessArticle
Nanostructured SmFeO3 Gas Sensors: Investigation of the Gas Sensing Performance Reproducibility for Colorectal Cancer Screening
Sensors 2020, 20(20), 5910; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20205910 - 19 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 516
Abstract
Among the various chemoresistive gas sensing properties studied so far, the sensing response reproducibility, i.e., the capability to reproduce a device with the same sensing performance, has been poorly investigated. However, the reproducibility of the gas sensing performance is of fundamental importance for [...] Read more.
Among the various chemoresistive gas sensing properties studied so far, the sensing response reproducibility, i.e., the capability to reproduce a device with the same sensing performance, has been poorly investigated. However, the reproducibility of the gas sensing performance is of fundamental importance for the employment of these devices in on-field applications, and to demonstrate the reliability of the process development. This sensor property became crucial for the preparation of medical diagnostic tools, in which the use of specific chemoresistive gas sensors along with a dedicated algorithm can be used for screening diseases. In this work, the reproducibility of SmFeO3 perovskite-based gas sensors has been investigated. A set of four SmFeO3 devices, obtained from the same screen-printing deposition, have been tested in laboratory with both controlled concentrations of CO and biological fecal samples. The fecal samples tested were employed in the clinical validation protocol of a prototype for non-invasive colorectal cancer prescreening. Sensors showed a high reproducibility degree, with an error lower than 2% of the response value for the test with CO and lower than 6% for fecal samples. Finally, the reproducibility of the SmFeO3 sensor response and recovery times for fecal samples was also evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Micro and Nano Technologies for Gas Sensing)
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Other

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Open AccessLetter
Effect of Tungsten Oxide Nanostructures on Sensitivity and Selectivity of Pollution Gases
Sensors 2020, 20(17), 4801; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20174801 - 26 Aug 2020
Viewed by 485
Abstract
We report on the different surface structures of tungsten oxides which have been synthesized using a simple post-annealing-free hot-filament CVD technique, including 0D nanoparticles (NPs), 1D nanorods (NRs), and 2D nanosheet assemblies of 3D hierarchical nanoflowers (NFs). The surface morphologies, crystalline structures, and [...] Read more.
We report on the different surface structures of tungsten oxides which have been synthesized using a simple post-annealing-free hot-filament CVD technique, including 0D nanoparticles (NPs), 1D nanorods (NRs), and 2D nanosheet assemblies of 3D hierarchical nanoflowers (NFs). The surface morphologies, crystalline structures, and material compositions have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The sensor performances based on the synthesized samples of various surface morphologies have been investigated, as well as the influences of operating temperature and applied bias. The sensing property depends closely on the surface morphology, and the 3D hierarchical nanoflowers-based gas sensor offers the best sensitivity and fastest response time to NH3 and CH3 gases when operated at room temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Micro and Nano Technologies for Gas Sensing)
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