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Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 12th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring (IWSHM 2019)"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Fu-Kuo Chang
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180, USA
Interests: structural health monitoring; design of integrated structures; smart structures; design and damage tolerance of composites structures; multi-functional materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Alfredo Güemes
Website
Guest Editor
Department Aeronautics, University Politecnica de Madrid, Spain
Interests: composite material; structural health monitoring; fiber optic sensors; smart structures; aerostructures
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to the 12th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring (IWSHM 2019) (http://web.stanford.edu/group/sacl/workshop/IWSHM2019/).

Authors of outstanding papers related to novel “smart” sensors, sensors for extreme environments, MEMS/NEMS sensors, fiber optics, piezoelectric, magneto-electric sensors, CNT sensors, etc., will be invited to submit extended versions of their work to the Special Issue for publication.

Prof. Dr. Fu-Kuo Chang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Static Tactile Sensing for a Robotic Electronic Skin via an Electromechanical Impedance-Based Approach
Sensors 2020, 20(10), 2830; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20102830 - 16 May 2020
Abstract
Tactile sensing is paramount for robots operating in human-centered environments to help in understanding interaction with objects. To enable robots to have sophisticated tactile sensing capability, researchers have developed different kinds of electronic skins for robotic hands and arms in order to realize [...] Read more.
Tactile sensing is paramount for robots operating in human-centered environments to help in understanding interaction with objects. To enable robots to have sophisticated tactile sensing capability, researchers have developed different kinds of electronic skins for robotic hands and arms in order to realize the ‘sense of touch’. Recently, Stanford Structures and Composites Laboratory developed a robotic electronic skin based on a network of multi-modal micro-sensors. This skin was able to identify temperature profiles and detect arm strikes through embedded sensors. However, sensing for the static pressure load is yet to be investigated. In this work, an electromechanical impedance-based method is proposed to investigate the response of piezoelectric sensors under static normal pressure loads. The smart skin sample was firstly fabricated by embedding a piezoelectric sensor into the soft silicone. Then, a series of static pressure tests to the skin were conducted. Test results showed that the first peak of the real part impedance signal was sensitive to static pressure load, and by using the proposed diagnostic method, this test setup could detect a resolution of 0.5 N force. Numerical simulation methods were then performed to validate the experimental results. The results of the numerical simulation prove the validity of the experiments, as well as the robustness of the proposed method in detecting static pressure loads using the smart skin. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Variable Thickness in Plates—A Solution for SHM Based on the Topological Derivative
Sensors 2020, 20(9), 2529; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20092529 - 29 Apr 2020
Abstract
The topological derivative tool is applied here in structural health monitoring (SHM) problems to locate small defects in a material plate with complex geometry that is subject to permanent multifrequency guided waves excitation. Compared to more standard SHM methods, based in measuring the [...] Read more.
The topological derivative tool is applied here in structural health monitoring (SHM) problems to locate small defects in a material plate with complex geometry that is subject to permanent multifrequency guided waves excitation. Compared to more standard SHM methods, based in measuring the time-lag between emitted and received propagative pulses plus some postprocessing, the topological derivative somehow compares the measured and computed (solving the full elasto-dynamic equations) response of the damaged plate, instead of relying on only the time of flight of the wave. Thus, the method profits the knowledge behind the physics of the problem and can cope with scenarios in which classical methods give poor results. The authors of this paper have already used the topological derivative in rectangular plates with constant thickness, but with defects consisting simply in both through slits and inclusions of a different material, and actuators/sensors located near the boundary, which makes very difficult to use standard SHM methods. This is an extension of the method, also considering the much more difficult to analyze case of plates with variable thickness and complex (non-rectangular) planform. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Design and Integration of a Wireless Stretchable Multimodal Sensor Network in a Composite Wing
Sensors 2020, 20(9), 2528; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20092528 - 29 Apr 2020
Abstract
This article presents the development of a stretchable sensor network with high signal-to-noise ratio and measurement accuracy for real-time distributed sensing and remote monitoring. The described sensor network was designed as an island-and-serpentine type network comprising a grid of sensor “islands” connected by [...] Read more.
This article presents the development of a stretchable sensor network with high signal-to-noise ratio and measurement accuracy for real-time distributed sensing and remote monitoring. The described sensor network was designed as an island-and-serpentine type network comprising a grid of sensor “islands” connected by interconnecting “serpentines.” A novel high-yield manufacturing process was developed to fabricate networks on recyclable 4-inch wafers at a low cost. The resulting stretched sensor network has 17 distributed and functionalized sensing nodes with low tolerance and high resolution. The sensor network includes Piezoelectric (PZT), Strain Gauge (SG), and Resistive Temperature Detector (RTD) sensors. The design and development of a flexible frame with signal conditioning, data acquisition, and wireless data transmission electronics for the stretchable sensor network are also presented. The primary purpose of the frame subsystem is to convert sensor signals into meaningful data, which are displayed in real-time for an end-user to view and analyze. The challenges and demonstrated successes in developing this new system are demonstrated, including (a) developing separate signal conditioning circuitry and components for all three sensor types (b) enabling simultaneous sampling for PZT sensors for impact detection and (c) configuration of firmware/software for correct system operation. The network was expanded with an in-house developed automated stretch machine to expand it to cover the desired area. The released and stretched network was laminated into an aerospace composite wing with edge-mount electronics for signal conditioning, processing, power, and wireless communication. Full article
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