Special Issue "Sustainable and Innovative Utilization of Common Reed (Phragmites Australis) in the Bioeconomy"

A special issue of Resources (ISSN 2079-9276).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Volker Beckmann
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Faculty of Law and Economics & Institute of Botany and Landscape Ecology, University of Greifswald, Soldmann Str. 15, 17487 Greifswald, Germany
Interests: institutional change; institutional economics; environmental and resource economics; governance of natural resources; agricultural and land economics; conservation; technology adoption; sustainable land management
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Niels Thevs
Website
Guest Editor
World Agroforestry Centre, Central Asia Office, 138 Toktogol Street, 720001 Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Interests: water resource management, remote sensing, wetland conservation, wetland utilization
Dr. Joachim Venus
Website
Guest Editor
Dept. Bioengineering, Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy (ATB Potsdam), Germany
Interests: industrial biotechnology, biorefineries, scaling-up of bioprocesses, pre-treatment of biomass for microbial conversion processes, bioconversion of renewable resources
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Wendelin Wichtmann
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Botany and Landscape Ecology, University of Greifswald, Soldmann Str. 15, 17487 Greifswald, Germany
Interests: paludiculture, soil physics, landscape–water balance, solute movement in soils, economy on farm level, water management, peatland utilisation, GHG emissions from agriculture, ecosystem services

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Common reed (Phragmites australis) is a worldwide-spread wetland plant with a high biomass potential and plant features that can turn it into a valuable renewable resource for multiple purposes. Traditional utilizations, like its use for thatching in Europe or for pulp and paper production in China, are still common; however, research and development is exploring new innovative utilization options, for instance, for advanced building materials, biofuels, biogas, and bioplastics. Besides proving technical feasibility, many obstacles are usually related to the up-scaling of new utilizations. Securing the resource base, employing cost-efficient and environmentally friendly harvesting technologies, establishing profitable supply and values chains, and raising consumer acceptance are just a few of them. Furthermore, there are different social and ecological contexts in which the utilization of reed is embedded. Reed beds are sometimes considered to be a strongly protected habitat—as, for example, in Germany—or invasive, as in North America. This Special Issue focuses on the sustainable and innovative utilization of reed biomass in the bioeconomy. Research papers, reviews, and case studies are welcome that introduce new utilizations and/or discuss sustainability issues related to reed utilization. In particular, we encourage papers on the organization of supply chains, the acceptance of final consumers, sustainable harvesting techniques, property rights and governances structures, and governmental regulations of the utilization of common reed in the bioeconomy.

Prof. Dr. Volker Beckmann
Dr. Niels Thevs
Dr. Joachim Venus
Dr. Wendelin Wichtmann
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Resources is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioeconomy
  • common reed
  • wetlands
  • renewable construction materials
  • biogas
  • bioplastics
  • biofuels

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Biomethane Yield from Different European Phragmites australis Genotypes, Compared with Other Herbaceous Wetland Species Grown at Different Fertilization Regimes
Resources 2020, 9(5), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources9050057 - 12 May 2020
Abstract
Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia, T. angustifolia and Arundo donax are tall wetland graminoids with the potential to replace fossil fuels under sustainable cultivation conditions. We investigated the biomethane (CH4) production of these four species, including four different genotypes of [...] Read more.
Phragmites australis, Typha latifolia, T. angustifolia and Arundo donax are tall wetland graminoids with the potential to replace fossil fuels under sustainable cultivation conditions. We investigated the biomethane (CH4) production of these four species, including four different genotypes of P. australis, which represent the high intraspecific diversity of European reed. All plants were grown under three different macronutrient supplies (no nutrients added, an equivalent of 75 kg N ha−1 year−1 added and an equivalent of 500 kg N ha−1 year−1 added). Biomethane production was measured in four independent batch digestion tests. Across all experiments, fertilization regime had little effect on CH4 yield, which was on average 222 ± 31 L kg−1 volatile solids (VS). The lowest yield was produced by T. angustifolia (140 L kgVS−1) receiving no nutrients, while the highest yield was produced by A. donax (305 L kgVS−1) in the highest nutrient treatment. The intraspecific diversity of P. australis did not affect biomethane production. All P. australis genotypes produced on average 226 ± 19 L CH4 kgVS−1, which, although high, was still lower than conventional biogas species. The biomass production of P. australis was less increased by fertilization than that of Typha sp. and A. donax, but all species had similar biomass without fertilization. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Biomass Resources of Phragmites australis in Kazakhstan: Historical Developments, Utilization, and Prospects
Resources 2020, 9(6), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/resources9060074 - 16 Jun 2020
Abstract
Common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steud.) is a highly productive wetland plant and a potentially valuable source of renewable biomass worldwide. There is more than 10 million ha of reed area globally, distributed mainly across Eurasia followed by America and [...] Read more.
Common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steud.) is a highly productive wetland plant and a potentially valuable source of renewable biomass worldwide. There is more than 10 million ha of reed area globally, distributed mainly across Eurasia followed by America and Africa. The literature analysis in this paper revealed that Kazakhstan alone harbored ca. 1,600,000–3,000,000 ha of reed area, mostly distributed in the deltas and along the rivers of the country. Herein, we explored the total reed biomass stock of 17 million t year−1 which is potentially available for harvesting in the context of wise use of wetlands. The aim of this paper is to reveal the distribution of reed resource potential in wetland areas of 13 provinces of Kazakhstan and the prospects for its sustainable utilization. Reed can be used as feedstock as an energy source for the production of pellets and biofuels, as lignocellulosic biomass for the production of high strength fibers for novel construction and packaging materials, and innovative polymers for lightweight engineering plastics and adhesive coatings. Thereby, it is unlikely that reed competes for land that otherwise is used for food production. Full article
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