Special Issue "Open Access"

A special issue of Publications (ISSN 2304-6775).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Remedios Melero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de Alimentos-CSIC. Av Profesor Agustin Escardino 7, 46980 Paterna, Valencia, Spain
Tel. +34 963900022
Interests: open access; scholarly publications; open access repositories; open access policies; copyright issues

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is not an accurate date for the birth of open access scholarly outputs. However, “open access” was first defined in 2002,  during the the Budapest Open Access Initiative. At the beginning, some sceptics believed that this could be the result of a naïve community, who claimed for more visibility and access to research publications. However, open access drums have begun to spread and initiatives around the movement have begun to emerge. The green route, that is, the depositing of copies of research results in open access repositories, and the gold route, that is, the publishing of open access journals, have become familiar among researchers. The creation of institutional repositories, the emergence of new journal business models, the technological implementations that lead to interoperability between systems, the services created over repositories, and the institutional and funder policies in favor of open access to science, have made researchers aware of the benefits of open access and incorporate open access in their customary practices for distributing and sharing their research and academic outputs. On the other hand, open access is not limited to scientific publications; it covers other types of digital objects, such as monographs, theses, e-learning materials, audiovisual stuff, research data or any other digital piece. In this sense, research data are gaining importance, as can be seen from governmental statements, guidelines, and funder mandates. Sharing raw data can generate new results, avoid duplication, and create new services and products, as a result of their harvest and aggregation. Open access does not mean “pay to publish,” does not mean predatory publishing, does not mean lowering quality standards, but the sharing and reuse of pieces that are mostly publicly funded.

I would like to finish this brief discussion about open access with portions of two speeches made by Neelie Kroes, the former European Commission Vice-President responsible for the Digital Agenda. The first one was made during the open access week in 2011:
“I am a fan of open access and innovation. OA to scientific information allows more benefits of science for education and innovation.  Access cannot be a luxury for Europe, it is a  must… The results of publicly funded research should be spread as widely and quickly as possible.” (1)

The second speech was made during the Research Data Alliance Launch and First Plenary:
“I have no doubt that we are entering that phase [the era of open science] and that the impact will be good for citizens, good for scientists, and good for society. Whether it is scientific results, the data they are based on, the software used for analysis, or the educational resources that help us teach and learn, being more open can help, and can transform every discipline from astronomy to zoology, and make our lives better.” (2)

Both pieces articulately reflect the potential of open access and introduce the next new paradigm, that of open science, which encompasses the whole research life cycle, from the conception to the dissemination of research data and results.

This Special Issue will try to cover the different issues and features of open access to scholarly outputs: interoperability, legal issues, publication ethics, open research data, new metrics and OA,  visibility, accountability, OA policies and compliance, journal business models, young researchers and open access, open education, open evaluation tools, etc.

(1)Neelie Kroes (2011).  EU Commissioner Kroes on Open 2011 and Open Access. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAkf7VmpQ5M&feature=player_embedded&mid=50.
(2) Neelie Kroes (2013).  Opening up scientific data. Available at http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_SPEECH-13-236_en.htm

Remedios Melero
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Publications is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • open access
  • academic outputs
  • scientific publications

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Open Scholarship Practices Reshaping South Africa’s Scholarly Publishing Roadmap
Publications 2015, 3(4), 263-284; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications3040263 - 08 Dec 2015
Cited by 5
Abstract
South African higher education institutions are the largest producers of research output on the African continent. Given this status, South African researchers have a moral obligation to share their research output with the rest of the continent via a medium that minimizes challenges [...] Read more.
South African higher education institutions are the largest producers of research output on the African continent. Given this status, South African researchers have a moral obligation to share their research output with the rest of the continent via a medium that minimizes challenges of access; open scholarship is that medium. The majority of South African higher education libraries provide an open access publishing service. However, in most of these cases this service is via engagement with the green open access route, that is, institutional repositories (IR). Some of the libraries have piloted and adopted gold open access services such as publishing of “diamond” gold open access journals and supporting article processing charges. The experiment with publishing open monographs is a new venture. This venture must be viewed against the backdrop of the need for open educational resources (OERs). OER is an area that is very much in a fledgling stage and is gaining traction, albeit, at a slow pace. The growth of IRs, the growth in support for gold open access including the library acting as a publisher, the experimentation with open monographs, and OERs are all shaping South Africa’s scholarly publishing roadmap. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access)
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Open AccessCommunication
Fee Waivers for Open Access Journals
Publications 2015, 3(3), 155-167; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications3030155 - 05 Aug 2015
Cited by 12
Abstract
Open access journals which charge article processing charges (APCs) sometimes offer fee waivers to authors who cannot afford to pay them. This article measures the extent of this practice among the largest toll access and open access publishers by gathering stated fee waiver [...] Read more.
Open access journals which charge article processing charges (APCs) sometimes offer fee waivers to authors who cannot afford to pay them. This article measures the extent of this practice among the largest toll access and open access publishers by gathering stated fee waiver policies from publishers’ websites. A majority (68.8%) were found to offer fee waivers and sometimes they are only available to authors from low- and middle-income countries. This has implications for the ability of authors without funding to publish in journals from these publishers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Open Access Publishing of Health Research: Does Open Access Publishing Facilitate the Translation of Research into Health Policy and Practice?
Publications 2016, 4(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications4010002 - 21 Jan 2016
Cited by 2
Abstract
Health practitioners and policy makers translate health research into practice and policy. However, these end users have limited access to full versions of peer-reviewed literature in subscription journals. Thus, the essential information bypasses the people it is designed to help and the health [...] Read more.
Health practitioners and policy makers translate health research into practice and policy. However, these end users have limited access to full versions of peer-reviewed literature in subscription journals. Thus, the essential information bypasses the people it is designed to help and the health benefits of medical research are limited and delayed. Open access (OA) publishing is one strategy to facilitate the translation of research to improve health. This review explores the evidence that OA publishing is an effective strategy to facilitate the translation of research and improve health. The review examines citation benefit, knowledge translation, diffusion impact, self-archiving and regional responses, and found entrenched views about OA publishing but little empirical research.The many biases and flaws in published research lead to a high level of waste and limit the ability to find innovative solutions to the burgeoning health costs. Evidence is presented here that OA publishing would facilitate a reduction in these flaws and biases, reduce waste in research and facilitate innovation. Although there are positive signs of change, more action and more research are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access)
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