Special Issue "Proteomics to Unravel Plant Adaptation, Acclimation or Vulnerability to Stress and Diseases"

A special issue of Proteomes (ISSN 2227-7382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Laurence Bindschedler
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Senior Lecturer in Plant Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL), Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX, UK
Interests: plant–fungi interaction; plant pathogens; obligate biotrophs; plant immunity and susceptibility; quantitative plant proteomics; cereal powdery mildews; virulence; effector proteins; RNAi; plant disease control
Prof. Dr. Stefanie Wienkoop
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecogenomics and Systems Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Interests: plant–microbes interactions; plant molecular ecology; plant proteomics; plant physiology; plant biology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Dominique Job
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CNRS/UCBL/INSA/Bayer CropScience Joint Laboratory (UMR5240), Bayer CropScience, 14-20 rue Pierre Baizet, F-69263 Lyon CEDEX, France
Interests: plant proteomics; plant biotechnology; plant physiology; plant biology; plant biodiversity; plant–fungi (Botrytis) interactions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue “Proteomics to Unravel Plant Adaptation, Acclimation or Vulnerability to Stress and Diseases” will focus on how plant proteomes evolve and change when plants are subjected to stress or diseases, as a lot has still to be explored on how plants cope with the harsh environment surrounding them. Crucial lessons have to be learnt to improve the quality and yield of crops subjected to increased temperatures, salinity stress, drought, pests, and microbial diseases, in order to cope with the constraints associated with climate change, the main of which is the reduction of arable land, while supporting the increased pressure to produce a sufficient amount of safe food in a sustainable manner. In the last two decades, plant proteomics has established itself as a new discipline. This has been made possible by the increasing number of available plant genomes, since the first sequenced genome of the diploid model plant Arabidopsis thaliana published in 2000, shortly followed by the rice genome in 2002. Together with the tremendous advancement of mass spectrometry, it is now possible to study the proteomes of many food and utility crops and other photosynthetic organisms relevant to the safeguard of our planet. We believe that plant proteomics will further advance knowledge in areas where other omics are ineffective, allowing to decipher plants’ perception of the environment and plant–pests and plant–pathogens interactions.

This Special Issue of Proteomes welcomes submissions of original research articles, as well as review and opinion papers, that aim at unraveling the molecular and physiological processes by which plants respond to environmental stimuli, in particular during stress or disease, with the use of proteomics tools or in combination with other “omics” tools. Technical developments relevant for plant proteomics analyses are also welcomed. 

Dr. Laurence Bindschedler
Prof. Dr. Stefanie Wienkoop
Prof. Dr. Dominique Job
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Proteomes is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Omics data integration
  • Plant physiology and evolution
  • Plant stress
  • Plant disease
  • Plant pathogens
  • Plant interactions with their environment
  • Plant proteomics
  • Quantitative proteomics
  • Protein post-translational modifications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Heat Stress Triggers Differential Protein Accumulation in the Extracellular Matrix of Sorghum Cell Suspension Cultures
Proteomes 2020, 8(4), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes8040029 - 22 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1087
Abstract
Plants reprogram gene expression as an adaptive response to survive high temperatures. While the identity and functions of intracellular heat stress-responsive proteins have been extensively studied, the heat response of proteins secreted to the extracellular matrix is unknown. Here, we used Sorghum bicolor [...] Read more.
Plants reprogram gene expression as an adaptive response to survive high temperatures. While the identity and functions of intracellular heat stress-responsive proteins have been extensively studied, the heat response of proteins secreted to the extracellular matrix is unknown. Here, we used Sorghum bicolor, a species adapted for growth in hot climates, to investigate the extracellular heat-induced responses. When exposed to 40 °C for 72 h, heat-sensitive Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures died, while ICSB338 sorghum cell cultures survived by activation of a transcriptional response characterized by the induction of HSP70 and HSP90 genes. Quantitative proteomic analysis of proteins recovered from cell culture medium revealed specific heat stress-induced protein accumulation within the sorghum secretome. Of the 265 secreted proteins identified, 31 responded to heat (≥2-fold change), with 84% possessing a predicted signal peptide for targeting to the classical secretory pathway. The differentially accumulated proteins have putative functions in metabolism, detoxification, and protein modifications. A germin (SORBI_3003G427700) was highly heat-inducible at both protein and gene level. Overall, our study reveals new insights into sorghum responses to heat and provides a useful resource of extracellular proteins that could serve as targets for developing thermotolerant crops. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD021536. Full article
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Article
Comparative Proteomics of Root Apex and Root Elongation Zones Provides Insights into Molecular Mechanisms for Drought Stress and Recovery Adjustment in Switchgrass
Proteomes 2020, 8(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes8010003 - 19 Feb 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1352
Abstract
Switchgrass plants were grown in a Sandwich tube system to induce gradual drought stress by withholding watering. After 29 days, the leaf photosynthetic rate decreased significantly, compared to the control plants which were watered regularly. The drought-treated plants recovered to the same leaf [...] Read more.
Switchgrass plants were grown in a Sandwich tube system to induce gradual drought stress by withholding watering. After 29 days, the leaf photosynthetic rate decreased significantly, compared to the control plants which were watered regularly. The drought-treated plants recovered to the same leaf water content after three days of re-watering. The root tip (1cm basal fragment, designated as RT1 hereafter) and the elongation/maturation zone (the next upper 1 cm tissue, designated as RT2 hereafter) tissues were collected at the 29th day of drought stress treatment, (named SDT for severe drought treated), after one (D1W) and three days (D3W) of re-watering. The tandem mass tags mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics analysis was performed to identify the proteomes, and drought-induced differentially accumulated proteins (DAPs). From RT1 tissues, 6156, 7687, and 7699 proteins were quantified, and 296, 535, and 384 DAPs were identified in the SDT, D1W, and D3W samples, respectively. From RT2 tissues, 7382, 7255, and 6883 proteins were quantified, and 393, 587, and 321 proteins DAPs were identified in the SDT, D1W, and D3W samples. Between RT1 and RT2 tissues, very few DAPs overlapped at SDT, but the number of such proteins increased during the recovery phase. A large number of hydrophilic proteins and stress-responsive proteins were induced during SDT and remained at a higher level during the recovery stages. A large number of DAPs in RT1 tissues maintained the same expression pattern throughout drought treatment and the recovery phases. The DAPs in RT1 tissues were classified in cell proliferation, mitotic cell division, and chromatin modification, and those in RT2 were placed in cell wall remodeling and cell expansion processes. This study provided information pertaining to root zone-specific proteome changes during drought and recover phases, which will allow us to select proteins (genes) as better defined targets for developing drought tolerant plants. The mass spectrometry proteomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD017441. Full article
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