Special Issue "Blood-Brain Barrier Proteomics"

A special issue of Proteomes (ISSN 2227-7382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2023 | Viewed by 3062

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yannis Karamanos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Blood-Brain Barrier Laboratory, UR 2465, University Artois, F-62300 Lens, France
Interests: blood-brain barrier; proteomics; extracellular vesicles; glycobiology; de-N-glycosylation enzymes
Dr. Gwenael Pottiez
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Caprion Biosciences Inc., 141 President Kennedy Ave., Suite SB-5658, Montreal, QC H2X 3Y7, Canada
Interests: discovery proteomics; Mass Spectrometry-base quantitation; extracellular vesicles

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to brain homeostasis by regulating the passage of endogenous and exogenous compounds. Despite decades of research and progress, the BBB is not completely characterized and crossing the BBB remains a critical obstacle in drug development to fight central nervous system (CNS) diseases, i.e., brain tumours, neurodegeneration, neurological disorders, etc. Since the initial discovery of a physiological and physical barrier separating the CNS from the peripheral system, it has progressively been demonstrated that the BBB is a dynamic barrier, thanks to the occurrence of specialized proteins, namely transporters, receptors, efflux pumps, etc. It is now acknowledged that the microvascular endothelium, astrocytes, pericytes and neurons participate in the barrier’s function and constitute the assembly of cells, more recently called “neurovascular unit” (NVU). In addition, the extracellular matrix also plays a crucial role in the NVU. This view of the BBB is critical to understand its development and its physiology. Nowadays, the BBB is considered to be constituted of a gathering of NVU units along the brain vascular tree that give to the BBB and the brain its unique features.

The genomic and proteomic technologies used over the last two decades has already provided several means to extend the BBB knowledge and to investigate additional routes to bypass this barrier. These profiling technologies have been applied to BBB models to decipher the physiological characteristics and, under stress conditions, to understand the molecular mechanisms of brain diseases. Now that the work is in progress to understand the human BBB, it will be necessary to identify the molecular expression, to clarify interspecies and in vivo–in vitro differences, and to estimate transport function in humans. Certainly a thorough proteomic analysis will provide additional information concerning brain pathologies or BBB metabolism.

This Special Issue of Proteomes welcomes submissions of original research or review articles aiming to unravel the physiological and pathological functioning of BBB with the use of proteomics tools. We ask experts in the field to contribute their most recent research and perspectives on this fascinating and rapidly progressing topic.

Prof. Dr. Yannis Karamanos
Dr. Gwenael Pottiez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Proteomes is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

 

  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Brain capillary endothelial cells
  • Neurovascular unit
  • Drug development
  • Proteomics
  • Quantitative proteomics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Disturbance of Key Cellular Subproteomes upon Propofol Treatment Is Associated with Increased Permeability of the Blood-Brain Barrier
Proteomes 2022, 10(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes10030028 - 15 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 805
Abstract
Background: Propofol is a short-acting anesthetic, which is often used for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia, sedation for mechanically ventilated adults and procedural sedation. Several side effects of propofol are known and a substantial number of patients suffer from post-operative delirium after [...] Read more.
Background: Propofol is a short-acting anesthetic, which is often used for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia, sedation for mechanically ventilated adults and procedural sedation. Several side effects of propofol are known and a substantial number of patients suffer from post-operative delirium after propofol application. In this study, we analyzed the effect of propofol on the function and protein expression profile on a proteome-wide scale. Methods: We cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells in absence and presence of propofol and analyzed the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by fluorescein passage and protein abundance on a proteome-wide scale by mass spectrometry. Results: Propofol interfered with the function of the blood-brain barrier. This was not due to decreased adhesion of propofol-treated human brain microvascular endothelial cells. The proteomic analysis revealed that some key pathways in these cells were disturbed, such as oxygen metabolism, DNA damage recognition and response to stress. Conclusions: Propofol has strong effects on protein expression which could explain several side effects of propofol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Blood-Brain Barrier Proteomics)
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Review

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Review
Proteome of the Luminal Surface of the Blood–Brain Barrier
Proteomes 2021, 9(4), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/proteomes9040045 - 10 Nov 2021
Viewed by 1584
Abstract
Interrogation of the molecular makeup of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) using proteomic techniques has contributed to the cataloguing and functional understanding of the proteins uniquely organized at this specialized interface. The majority of proteomic studies have focused on cellular components of the BBB, [...] Read more.
Interrogation of the molecular makeup of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) using proteomic techniques has contributed to the cataloguing and functional understanding of the proteins uniquely organized at this specialized interface. The majority of proteomic studies have focused on cellular components of the BBB, including cultured brain endothelial cells (BEC). Detailed proteome mapping of polarized BEC membranes and their intracellular endosomal compartments has led to an improved understanding of the processes leading to internalization and transport of various classes of molecules across the BBB. Quantitative proteomic methods have further enabled absolute and comparative quantification of key BBB transporters and receptors in isolated BEC and microvessels from various species. However, translational studies further require in vivo/in situ analyses of the proteins exposed on the luminal surface of BEC in vessels under various disease and treatment conditions. In vivo proteomics approaches, both profiling and quantitative, usually rely on ‘capturing’ luminally-exposed proteins after perfusion with chemical labeling reagents, followed by analysis with various mass spectrometry-based approaches. This manuscript reviews recent advances in proteomic analyses of luminal membranes of BEC in vitro and in vivo and their applications in translational studies focused on developing novel delivery methods across the BBB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Blood-Brain Barrier Proteomics)
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