Special Issue "Laser Processing of Polymer Materials"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Processing and Performance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Esther Rebollar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid, Spain
Interests: laser micro- and nanoprocessing of polymers; laser induced period surface structures in polymers; polymer thin films; applications of modified polymers; functional polymers; pulsed laser deposition; atomic force microscopy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the first laser was developed in 1960, laser technology has been growing, and the processing of polymers has now become an important field of applied and fundamental research. Laser techniques constitute attractive alternatives for processing of soft materials affording the sought versatility and reliability. Indeed, laser techniques can be used to fabricate substrates with a variety of high-precision patterns at different length scales and can be applied in noncontact and flexible set-ups under a great variety of environments. Moreover, laser processing can be adapted both to the materials’ properties and to the desired surface pattern by controlling the laser characteristics.

This Special issue “Laser Processing of Polymer Materials” aims to gather contributions on recent advances about the use of laser techniques for the processing of polymers, both concerning surface and bulk modification, micro- and nanostructuring, and considering both the fundamentals of laser processing and the applications of the modified polymer materials.

Dr. Esther Rebollar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Laser microstructuring of polymers
  • Laser nanostructuring of polymers
  • Laser foaming
  • Laser ablation of polymers
  • Laser texturing of polymers
  • Laser polymerization
  • Laser deposition of polymers
  • Laser transfer and printing of polymers
  • Applications of polymers processed by laser
  • Modeling of laser processing of polymers

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Correlations between Process Parameters and Outcome Properties of Laser-Sintered Polyamide
Polymers 2019, 11(11), 1850; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11111850 - 09 Nov 2019
Abstract
As additive manufacturing (AM) becomes more accessible, correlating process parameters with geometric and mechanical properties is an important topic. Because the number of process variables in AM is large, extensive studies must be conducted in order to underline every particular influence. The study [...] Read more.
As additive manufacturing (AM) becomes more accessible, correlating process parameters with geometric and mechanical properties is an important topic. Because the number of process variables in AM is large, extensive studies must be conducted in order to underline every particular influence. The study focuses on two variables—part orientation in the orthogonal horizontal plane and energy density—and targets two outcomes—geometric and tensile properties of the parts. The AM process was conducted on selective laser sintering (SLS) machine EOS Formiga P100 using EOS white powder polyamide (PA2200). After finishing the sinterization process, the parts were postprocessed, measured, weighted, and mechanically tested. The geometric evaluation and mass measurements of every sample allowed us to compute the density of all parts according to the sinterization energy and orientation, and to determine the relative error of every dimension. By conducting the tensile testing, the elastic and strength properties were determined according to process variables. A linear trend regarding sample density and energy density was identified. Also, large relative dimensional errors were recorded for the lowest energy density. Mechanical properties encountered the highest value for the highest energy density at a 45° orientation angle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Processing of Polymer Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Stripping of PFA Fluoropolymer Coatings Using a Nd:YAG Laser (Q-Switch) and an Yb Fiber Laser (CW)
Polymers 2019, 11(11), 1738; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11111738 - 24 Oct 2019
Abstract
Fluoropolymers such as PFA are used as coatings for the protection of metal substrates due to their high chemical inertia and non-stick properties. These are “wear and tear” coatings and they degrade, at which point they should be removed for a new application. [...] Read more.
Fluoropolymers such as PFA are used as coatings for the protection of metal substrates due to their high chemical inertia and non-stick properties. These are “wear and tear” coatings and they degrade, at which point they should be removed for a new application. The removal of these types of coating by laser is of interest due to the process’s flexibility, precision, ease of automation, and environmental sustainability. The efficiency of the procedure was shown with the use of a source in a pulsed Nd:YAG and a source in continuous mode of fiber (Yb). The rates of stripping (cm2/min) and fluence (J/cm2) were analyzed and related to the power of the laser sources. Variations of the substrate after stripping were studied: roughness and hardness. The properties of the coating, thickness, roughness, water sliding angle, and microhardness were also evaluated. It was concluded that the laser in continuous mode was more efficient than the pulsed laser; laser removal of fluoropolymers has a strong relationship with reflectivity, and the mechanical and surface properties of the substrate after stripping remained virtually unchanged. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Processing of Polymer Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Controlling the Performance of Polymer Lasers via the Cavity Coupling
Polymers 2019, 11(5), 764; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11050764 - 01 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The polarization and threshold of distributed feedback (DFB) polymer lasers were controlled by adjusting the cavity coupling. The cavity of DFB polymer lasers consisted of two gratings, which was fabricated by a two-beam multi-exposure holographic technique. The coupling strength of the cavity modes [...] Read more.
The polarization and threshold of distributed feedback (DFB) polymer lasers were controlled by adjusting the cavity coupling. The cavity of DFB polymer lasers consisted of two gratings, which was fabricated by a two-beam multi-exposure holographic technique. The coupling strength of the cavity modes was tuned by changing the angle between the two gratings. The threshold of the polymer lasers decreased with reducing the coupling strength of the cavity modes. A minimum threshold was observed at the lowest coupling strength. Moreover, the azimuthally polarized output of the polymer lasers was modified by changing the cavity coupling. These results may provide additional perspectives to improve the performance of DFB polymer lasers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Processing of Polymer Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Flexible Random Laser Using Silver Nanoflowers
Polymers 2019, 11(4), 619; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11040619 - 03 Apr 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
A random laser was achieved in a polymer membrane with silver nanoflowers on a flexible substrate. The strong confinement of the polymer waveguide and the localized field enhancement of silver nanoflowers were essential for the low-threshold random lasing action. The lasing wavelength can [...] Read more.
A random laser was achieved in a polymer membrane with silver nanoflowers on a flexible substrate. The strong confinement of the polymer waveguide and the localized field enhancement of silver nanoflowers were essential for the low-threshold random lasing action. The lasing wavelength can be tuned by bending the flexible substrate. The solution phase synthesis of the silver nanoflowers enables easy realization of this type of random lasers. The flexible and high-efficiency random lasers provide favorable factors for the development of imaging and sensing devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Processing of Polymer Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Study on the Main Influencing Factors in the Removal Process of Non-Stick Fluoropolymer Coatings Using Nd:YAG Laser
Polymers 2019, 11(1), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11010123 - 12 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The coatings with fluoropolymer resins rich in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are applied as anti-adherent coatings on aluminum–magnesium substrates for use in food containers. In many cases, due to wear, they must be stripped for the application of a new [...] Read more.
The coatings with fluoropolymer resins rich in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are applied as anti-adherent coatings on aluminum–magnesium substrates for use in food containers. In many cases, due to wear, they must be stripped for the application of a new coating on the same substrate. There are several processes for this: blasting, plasma, pyrolysis, chemical processes, laser, high pressure water, and combinations of these. This work focuses on the characterization of the main factors that condition the FEP coating removal process by a continuous wave (CW) Nd:YAG laser, and on the determination of the efficiency of this type of technology used for this purpose. Stripping surface per unit of time and energy consumption per unit area has been determined among other efficiency indicators. Regarding the characterization of the coating object of study, its thickness, surface roughness, contact angle, microhardness and absorbance-reflectance responses have been determined, and the results have been compared with those obtained in the case of PTFE. In addition, to evaluate the mechanical damage caused in the substrate after coating removal by (CW) Nd:YAG laser, the tensile strength, Vickers hardness, Ra and Rz roughness, and the substrate thickness have been measured and analyzed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Processing of Polymer Materials)
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