Special Issue "Forensic Engineering of Advanced Polymer Materials"

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Theory and Simulation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Marek M. Kowalczuk
Website
Guest Editor
1. Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, Zabrze, Poland
2. School of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK
Interests: biocompatible and biodegradable polymer systems; polymer mass spectrometry; bioactive oligomers; controlled drug delivery systems; ring-opening polymerization; forensic engineering of advanced polymeric materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Wanda Sikorska
Website
Guest Editor
Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34, M. Curie-Sklodowska St., 41-819 Zabrze, Poland
Interests: biodegradable polyesters; cosmetic packages; organic recycling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Classical forensic polymer engineering concerns the study of failure in polymer products. This area of science comprises the fracture of plastic products, or any other reason that such a product fails in service, or fails to meet its specification. A recent, novel approach, that is, the forensic engineering of advanced polymer materials (FEAPM), deals with the evaluation and understanding of the relationships between their structure, properties, and behavior before, during, and after practical applications. FEAPM provides a central driving force for the otherwise disconnected works, and should help to precisely design structured polymer materials, and to avoid potential failures of the commercial products manufactured from them.

This Special Issue is dedicated to the prediction of and case studies related to the design of precisely structured polymer materials for diverse applications (e.g., in medicine, advanced plastic technologies, cosmetic industry, utilization of plastic wastes, and agrichemistry).  Both ex-ante investigations and ex-post studies are welcome, in order to increase the efficiency, and to define and minimize the potential failure of precisely structured polymer products. Reviews, full papers, and short communications highlighting the current trends in this area are expected.

Prof. Dr. Marek M. Kowalczuk
Dr. Wanda Sikorska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Thermal Transitions in P3HT:PC60BM Films Based on Electrical Resistance Measurements
Polymers 2020, 12(7), 1458; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12071458 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
In this paper, we present research on thermal transition temperature determination in poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM), and their blends, which are materials that are conventionally used in organic optoelectronics. Here, for the first time the results of electrical resistance [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present research on thermal transition temperature determination in poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC60BM), and their blends, which are materials that are conventionally used in organic optoelectronics. Here, for the first time the results of electrical resistance measurements are explored to detect thermal transitions temperatures, such as glass transition Tg and cold crystallization Tcc of the film. To confirm these results, the variable-temperature spectroscopic ellipsometry studies of the same samples were performed. The thermal transitions temperatures obtained with electrical measurements are well suited to phase diagram, constructed on the basis of ellipsometry in our previous work. The data presented here prove that electrical resistance measurements alone are sufficient for qualitative thermal analysis, which lead to the identification of characteristic temperatures in P3HT:PC60BM films. Based on the carried studies, it can be expected that the determination of thermal transition temperatures by means of electrical resistance measurements will also apply to other semi-conducting polymer films. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forensic Engineering of Advanced Polymer Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Forensic Engineering of Advanced Polymeric Materials—Part VII: Degradation of Biopolymer Welded Joints
Polymers 2020, 12(5), 1167; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051167 - 19 May 2020
Abstract
Welding technology may be considered as a promising processing method for the formation of packaging products from biopolymers. However, the welding processes used can change the properties of the polymer materials, especially in the region of the weld. In this contribution, the impact [...] Read more.
Welding technology may be considered as a promising processing method for the formation of packaging products from biopolymers. However, the welding processes used can change the properties of the polymer materials, especially in the region of the weld. In this contribution, the impact of the welding process on the structure and properties of biopolymer welds and their ability to undergo hydrolytic degradation will be discussed. Samples for the study were made from polylactide (PLA) and poly(3-hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) biopolymers which were welded using two methods: ultrasonic and heated tool welding. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed slight changes in the thermal properties of the samples resulting from the processing and welding method used. The results of hydrolytic degradation indicated that welds of selected biopolymers started to degrade faster than unwelded parts of the samples. The structure of degradation products at the molecular level was confirmed using mass spectrometry. It was found that hydrolysis of the PLA and PHA welds occurs via the random ester bond cleavage and leads to the formation of PLA and PHA oligomers terminated by hydroxyl and carboxyl end groups, similarly to as previously observed for unwelded PLA and PHA-based materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forensic Engineering of Advanced Polymer Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Predicted Studies of Branched and Cross-Linked Polyurethanes Based on Polyhydroxybutyrate with Polycaprolactone Triol in Soft Segments
Polymers 2020, 12(5), 1068; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12051068 - 07 May 2020
Abstract
The number of cross-links in the non-linear polyurethane structure is the basic factor affecting its properties. Selected properties of aliphatic polyurethanes with soft segments made of different amounts of polycaprolactonetriol, polycaprolactonediol and synthetic, telechelic poly([R,S]-3-hydroxybutyrate) were determined. On the basis of changes in [...] Read more.
The number of cross-links in the non-linear polyurethane structure is the basic factor affecting its properties. Selected properties of aliphatic polyurethanes with soft segments made of different amounts of polycaprolactonetriol, polycaprolactonediol and synthetic, telechelic poly([R,S]-3-hydroxybutyrate) were determined. On the basis of changes in polyurethane properties, the correlation between these properties and the construction of soft segments was found. The structure of polyurethanes, their morphology, hydrophilicity, thermal and mechanical properties were examined. These properties were changed linearly up to 15% content of polycaprolactonetriol in soft segments. A further increase in the amount of triol causes that these properties are mainly determined by the high number of cross-links. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forensic Engineering of Advanced Polymer Materials)
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