Sustainable Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Materials

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Fibers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2023) | Viewed by 9598

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China
Interests: Fiber-Reinforced Polymers (FRPs); Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECCs); strengthening and repair of concrete structures; durability of concrete structures; recycling of municipal solid waste
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China
Interests: Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP); Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC); strengthening and repairing of concrete structures; durability of concrete structures and recycling of municipal solid waste
Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong 999077, China
Interests: high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete; construction materials for marine and coastal infrastructures; smart and multi-functional cement-based materials; municipal solid waste recycling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
College of Civil and Engineering Management, Guangzhou Maritime University, Guangzhou, China
Interests: engineered cementitious composites, geopolymer and performance of concrete at elevated temperatures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To improve the resilience, durability, and sustainability of concrete infrastructure, sustainable fiber-reinforced cementitious materials (FRCM) have attracted the attention of researchers worldwide. Despite that extensive studies have been carried out in the past decades, there still remain many research barriers that need to be resolved in the futural innovative investigations. The goal of this Special Issue is to provide a platform to report the up-to-date development of FRCM. Researchers in the field of sustainable FRCM are encouraged to submit their works in the form of original research and review on this topic on themes including, but not limited to:

  • Design of sustainable FRCM with different supplemental cementitious materials;
  • Design of sustainable FRCM with environmentally friendly fibers; 
  • Design of sustainable FRCM using alternative binders, such as geopolymer and LC3;
  • Rheological properties of FRCM matrix and its influence on fiber dispersion;
  • 3D printing of sustainable FRCM;
  • Static and dynamic mechanical properties of sustainable FRCM;  
  • Durability of sustainable FRCM;
  • Bond behaviors between steel/FRP bar and sustainable FRCM;
  • Structural applications in the repair and retrofitting areas and newly-constructed infrastructural fields;
  • Experimental and numerical investigation on the fracture behavior of FRCM.

Prof. Dr. Weiwen Li
Dr. Menghuan Guo
Dr. Jing Yu
Dr. Shuai Fang
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 14693 KiB  
Article
Development of Sustainable Engineered Cementitious Composites by Incorporating Local Recycled Fine Aggregate
by Yingwu Zhou, Wenhui Guo, Shuyue Zheng, Feng Xing, Menghuan Guo and Zhongfeng Zhu
Polymers 2023, 15(12), 2701; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15122701 - 16 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2363
Abstract
In this study, sustainable engineered cementitious composites (ECC) exhibiting high tensile strength as well as high tensile strain capacity were successfully developed by incorporating polyethylene (PE) fiber, local recycled fine aggregate (RFA), and limestone calcined clay cement (LC3). The improvement in [...] Read more.
In this study, sustainable engineered cementitious composites (ECC) exhibiting high tensile strength as well as high tensile strain capacity were successfully developed by incorporating polyethylene (PE) fiber, local recycled fine aggregate (RFA), and limestone calcined clay cement (LC3). The improvement in tensile strength and tensile ductility was attributed to the self-cementing properties of RFA as well as the pozzolanic reaction between calcined clay and cement. Carbonate aluminates were also generated owing to the reaction between calcium carbonate in limestone and the aluminates in both calcined clay and cement. The bond strength between fiber and matrix was also enhanced. At the age of 150 days, the tensile stress-strain curves of ECC containing LC3 and RFA shifted from a bilinear model to a trilinear model, and the hydrophobic PE fiber exhibited hydrophilic bonding performance when embedded in RFA-LC3-ECC matrix, which could be explained by the densified cementitious matrix as well as the refined pore structure of ECC. Moreover, the substitution of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) by LC3 resulted in energy consumption and equivalent CO2 emission reduction ratios of 13.61% and 30.34%, respectively, when the replacement ratio of LC3 is 35%. Therefore, PE fiber-reinforced RFA-LC3-ECC demonstrates excellent mechanical performance as well as considerable environmental benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Materials)
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16 pages, 14276 KiB  
Article
Performance of Rubber Concrete Containing Polypropylene and Basalt Fibers under Coupled Sulfate Attack and Freeze–Thaw Conditions: An Experimental Evaluation
by Tao Ran, Jianyong Pang and Jincheng Yu
Polymers 2023, 15(9), 2066; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15092066 - 26 Apr 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1535
Abstract
Rubber concrete (RC) is a new type of concrete that is currently receiving a lot of attention, solving serious pollution problems by grinding waste tires into granules and adding them to concrete. However, rubber concrete has deficiencies in mechanics and durability, and has [...] Read more.
Rubber concrete (RC) is a new type of concrete that is currently receiving a lot of attention, solving serious pollution problems by grinding waste tires into granules and adding them to concrete. However, rubber concrete has deficiencies in mechanics and durability, and has been reinforced by adding fibers in many studies. In this study, the mechanical and durability properties of rubber concrete with added polypropylene and basalt fibers (PBRC) were investigated in a series of experiments including apparent morphology, mass, static compressive and tensile tests, ultrasonic non-destructive testing, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) tests under coupled environments of sulfate attack and freeze–thaw. The results showed that the mass loss rate of RC and PBRC gradually increased with the number of freeze–thaw cycles, with more pits and cement paste peeling from the specimen surface. Moreover, the compressive and splitting tensile strengths of RC and PBRC groups exhibited distinct trends, with the former group showing a lower residual strength relative to the latter. The residual compressive strength of the RC group was only 69.4% after 160 freeze–thaw cycles in 5% MgSO4 solution. However, it is worth noting that the addition of too many fibers also had a negative effect on the strength of the rubber concrete. Additionally, the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicated that the fibers restricted the formation of microcracks in the microstructure and curtailed the brittleness of the concrete. This study can provide a valuable reference for the application of environmentally friendly material fibers in recycled aggregate concrete. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Materials)
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21 pages, 8723 KiB  
Article
Durability Enhancement Effect of Silica Fume on the Bond Behavior of Concrete–PCM Composites under Environmental Conditions
by Mahmudul Hasan Mizan and Koji Matsumoto
Polymers 2023, 15(9), 2061; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15092061 - 26 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1066
Abstract
The long-term performance of the concrete–polymer cement mortar (PCM) interface under environmental exposure is crucial to the safety of the PCM overlaying method as the environmental exposure of the repaired structures caused further degradation of the interface, leading to a significant reduction in [...] Read more.
The long-term performance of the concrete–polymer cement mortar (PCM) interface under environmental exposure is crucial to the safety of the PCM overlaying method as the environmental exposure of the repaired structures caused further degradation of the interface, leading to a significant reduction in intended service life. This study investigates the durability enhancement effect of silica fume of the concrete–PCM interface, considering an individual action of elevated temperature (e.g., 60 °C) [constant (short and moderate duration) and cyclic conditions] and moisture content [continuous immersion and wetting/drying (W/D) cycle]. Our previous research confirmed that the use of silica fume forms more C-S-H with strong binding force and enhances the interfacial bonding strength due to the denser microstructure at the interface, and it is expected to be utilized for durability purposes under the aforementioned exposure conditions. Under all elevated temperature exposure conditions, the reduction percentage of the interfacial performance corresponding to the respective reference specimens reduced significantly with the inclusion of silica fume with overlay material. The occurrence of interface fracture at lower load and a greater number of pure interface fracture modes observed in normal PCM specimens compared to modified PCM specimens indicates a positive influence of higher adhesion with better durability of modified PCM overlay with substrate concrete. Under both conditions of moisture content, significant reduction in interfacial strength was observed in normal PCM specimens. In all cases, the reducing ratio of interfacial strength was higher in normal PCM compared to modified PCM, indicating a positive influence of silica fume under moisture content. Furthermore, silica fume inclusion shifts the fracture mode from pure interfacial fracture to composite fracture mode, indicating a positive response of silica fume to improve the resistance of interface fracture under moisture content. Conclusively, the use of silica fume improves concrete–overlay layer adhesion and enhances the bonding durability under environmental exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Materials)
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Review

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20 pages, 2707 KiB  
Review
Sustainable Cement Composite Integrating Waste Cellulose Fibre: A Comprehensive Review
by Sarah Fernando, Chamila Gunasekara, Amin Shahpasandi, Kate Nguyen, Massoud Sofi, Sujeeva Setunge, Priyan Mendis and Md. Tareq Rahman
Polymers 2023, 15(3), 520; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15030520 - 19 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3971
Abstract
This review presents the research conducted to date in the field of cement-based composites reinforced with waste paper-based cellulose fibres, focusing on their composition, mechanical properties, and durability characteristics. The literature demonstrates that the properties of raw material (depending on their own chemical [...] Read more.
This review presents the research conducted to date in the field of cement-based composites reinforced with waste paper-based cellulose fibres, focusing on their composition, mechanical properties, and durability characteristics. The literature demonstrates that the properties of raw material (depending on their own chemical composition) significantly influence the formation of the cement composite binders. When considering fresh properties, the presence of silica and magnesium compounds generally lead to favourable effects on the setting of the cement composite when combined with waste paper cellulose fibre. Reduction in density values, i.e., approximately 25%, was observed with the inclusion of waste paper fibres from 20 to 80% in cement composites. The homogeneous dispersion of fibres in the matrix is one of the crucial factors to achieve in order to develop composites with well-balanced mechanical properties incorporating waste paper cellulose fibres. Hence, dispersion of fibres can be improved by increasing water quantity corresponding to the optimal value, which was a water/cement ratio of 0.64 leading to optimum strength properties of the composite. Even though the effect of fibre dispersion in the matrix improves with the addition of water, higher porosity and voids govern the strength properties beyond an optimum water-to-cement ratio. Higher porosity leads to an increase in the water absorption and a lowering of the thermal conductivity properties with the addition of paper fibre in cement binders. Paper fibre absorbs a high amount of water leading to higher water absorption. This phenomenon is related to the hydrophilic nature of cellulosic fibres absorbing some volume of water due to their microporous structure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Fiber Reinforced Cementitious Materials)
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