Advancements in Rheology and Processing of Polymer Materials

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Physics and Theory".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 2802

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Center of Mathematics (CMAT), School of Science, University of Minho, Campus of Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
2. Transport Phenomena Research Center (CEFT), Faculty of Engineering at University of Porto (FEUP), Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: computational and applied mathematics; difference and differential equations; engineering mathematics; mathematics and computer science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Mechanical Engineering (Section of Mathematics), FEUP, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
2. Center for Mathematics, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
Interests: numerical analysis; integro-differential equations; mathematical modelling; viscoelastic flows; anomalous diffusion; machine learning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The rheology of polymer materials plays a crucial role in various industrial processes, such as extrusion, injection and blow molding, and film casting. Understanding and manipulating the rheological behavior of polymers is essential for achieving optimal processing conditions, improving product quality, and ensuring efficient manufacturing. This Special Issue aims to highlight recent advancements in this field, focusing on novel experimental techniques, theoretical models, and computational simulations that enhance our understanding of polymer flow behavior and its impact on processing techniques.

Potential Topics:

  1. Rheological characterization techniques for polymer processing:
    • Advances in rheological measurement methods for complex polymeric systems;
    • Rheological characterization of multiphase and filled polymer composites;
    • Time–temperature superposition and nonlinear rheological behavior in processing conditions.
  1. Rheology–processing relationships:
    • Rheological models for predicting processing behavior and product quality;
    • Rheology-driven optimization of processing parameters;
    • Role of rheological properties in polymer melt flow instabilities.
  1. Polymer processing techniques and rheological effects:
    • Rheology of polymer melts in extrusion and injection/blow molding processes;
    • Rheology and flow-induced crystallization in film casting and fiber spinning;
    • Rheological considerations in additive manufacturing and 3D printing of polymers.
  1. Computational rheology and modeling approaches:
    • Multiscale modeling and simulation of polymer processing;
    • Computational rheology for predicting flow behavior and process optimization;
    • Coupling rheology with other modeling techniques (e.g., molecular dynamics, finite element, finite volume, and finite differences).
  1. Emerging trends and future directions:
    • Rheology of biobased polymers and sustainable materials;
    • Rheological challenges in advanced processing technologies (e.g., microfluidics and electrospinning);
    • Novel rheological approaches for emerging polymer processing techniques.

The Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive overview of recent developments and future directions in the field of rheology and polymer processing. Researchers and experts are invited to submit their original research articles, reviews, and perspectives addressing the aforementioned topics. Submissions should present novel insights, experimental techniques, theoretical advancements, or computational modeling approaches that contribute to the field, and both experimental and computational studies are welcome.

Dr. Célio Fernandes
Dr. Luís L. Ferrás
Dr. Alexandre M. Afonso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polymeric systems
  • viscoelasticity
  • molding processes
  • additive manufacturing
  • 3D printing
  • multiscale modeling
  • computational rheology
  • sustainable materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 12315 KiB  
Article
Design and Modification of a Material Extrusion 3D Printer to Manufacture Functional Gradient PEEK Components
by Tobias Ritter, Eric McNiffe, Tom Higgins, Omid Sam-Daliri, Tomas Flanagan, Michael Walls, Pouyan Ghabezi, William Finnegan, Sinéad Mitchell and Noel M. Harrison
Polymers 2023, 15(18), 3825; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15183825 - 19 Sep 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1611
Abstract
In recent years, the creative use of polymers has been expanded as the range of achievable material properties and options for manufacturing and post-processing continually grows. The main goal of this research was to design and develop a fully-functioning material extrusion additive manufacturing [...] Read more.
In recent years, the creative use of polymers has been expanded as the range of achievable material properties and options for manufacturing and post-processing continually grows. The main goal of this research was to design and develop a fully-functioning material extrusion additive manufacturing device with the capability to produce functionally graded high-temperature thermoplastic PEEK (polyether ether ketone) materials through the manipulation of microstructure during manufacturing. Five different strategies to control the chamber temperature and crystallinity were investigated, and concepts of thermal control were introduced to govern the crystallisation and cooling mechanics during the extrusion process. The interaction of individually deposited beads of material during the printing process was investigated using scanning electron microscopy to observe and quantify the porosity levels and interlayer bonding strength, which affect the quality of the final part. Functional testing of the printed parts was carried out to identify crystallinity, boundary layer adhesion, and mechanical behaviour. Furnace cooling and annealing were found to be the most effective methods, resulting in the highest crystallinity of the part. Finally, a functionally graded material cylindrical part was printed successfully, incorporating both low and high crystalline regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancements in Rheology and Processing of Polymer Materials)
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19 pages, 4801 KiB  
Article
Modeling the Ultrasonic Micro-Injection Molding Process Using the Buckingham Pi Theorem
by Marco Salazar-Meza, Oscar Martínez-Romero, José Emiliano Reséndiz-Hernández, Daniel Olvera-Trejo, Jorge Alfredo Estrada-Díaz, Claudia Angélica Ramírez-Herrera and Alex Elías-Zúñiga
Polymers 2023, 15(18), 3779; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15183779 - 15 Sep 2023
Viewed by 781
Abstract
Dimensional analysis through the Buckingham Pi theorem was confirmed as an efficient mathematical tool to model the otherwise non-linear high order ultrasonic micro-injection molding process (UMIM). Several combinations of processing conditions were evaluated to obtain experimental measurements and validate the derived equations. UMIM [...] Read more.
Dimensional analysis through the Buckingham Pi theorem was confirmed as an efficient mathematical tool to model the otherwise non-linear high order ultrasonic micro-injection molding process (UMIM). Several combinations of processing conditions were evaluated to obtain experimental measurements and validate the derived equations. UMIM processing parameters, output variable energy consumption, and final specimen’s Young modulus were arranged in dimensionless groups and formulated as functional relationships, which lead to dimensionless equations that predict output variables as a function of the user-specified processing parameters and known material properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancements in Rheology and Processing of Polymer Materials)
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