3D and 4D Printing of Polymers: Modeling and Experimental Approaches

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Processing and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 543

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Widener University, Chester, PA 19013, USA
Interests: 3D printing; atomic force microscopy; material characterization; nanotechnology

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Widener University, 1 University Place, Chester, PA 19013, USA
Interests: additive manufacturing; fluid dynamics and heat transfer modeling; computational fluid dynamics; thermal management

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Guest Editor
Research Center, Léonard de Vinci Pôle Universitaire, 92916 Paris, France
Interests: polymers; biomedical applications; 3D bioprinting; 4D printing; biomedical

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Guest Editor
1. Léonard de Vinci Pôle Universitaire, Research Center, 92916 Paris La Défense, France
2. Arts et Métiers Institute of Technology, CNAM, LIFSE, HESAM University, 75013 Paris, France
Interests: additive manufacturing; 3D printing of polymers; 3D bioprinting; rheology of materials; mechanics of materials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the past decade, additive manufacturing via Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) has become a popular 3D printing techniques. Various materials have been introduced into FDM. However, polymers such as PLA, ABS, or TPU remain a core part of this technique. Recent efforts using these polymers have demonstrated the potential to expand 3D capabilities by introducing a 4th dimension via electrical, heat treatment, or mechanical stimuli. These novel techniques are dubbed 4D printing.

This Special Issue is focused on gathering the most recent scientific efforts in the modeling and experimentation of 3D printing using polymers, with a focus on 4D printing. This Special Issue invites contributions that address advances in 4D printing techniques, the heat transfer modeling of FDM printing, the mechanical characterization of 3D-printed parts, the enhancement of 3D printing conditions, high-speed 3D printing, and the optimization of FDM 3D printers. This list is only indicative and by no means exhaustive. Any original research or review articles on the simulation and experimentation of FDM 3D and 4D printing are welcome. 

Dr. Babak Eslami
Dr. Kamran Fouladi
Dr. Michèle Kanhonou
Dr. Hamid Reza Vanaei
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fused deposition modeling
  • 3D printing
  • 4D printing
  • CFD modeling
  • additive manufacturing
  • material characterization
  • 3D printing polymers

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

20 pages, 2983 KiB  
Article
Three-Dimensional Bioprinting of GelMA Hydrogels with Culture Medium: Balancing Printability, Rheology and Cell Viability for Tissue Regeneration
by Laura Mendoza-Cerezo, Jesús M. Rodríguez-Rego, Antonio Macías-García, Antuca Callejas-Marín, Luís Sánchez-Guardado and Alfonso C. Marcos-Romero
Polymers 2024, 16(10), 1437; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16101437 (registering DOI) - 19 May 2024
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Abstract
Three-dimensional extrusion bioprinting technology aims to become a fundamental tool for tissue regeneration using cell-loaded hydrogels. These biomaterials must have highly specific mechanical and biological properties that allow them to generate biosimilar structures by successive layering of material while maintaining cell viability. The [...] Read more.
Three-dimensional extrusion bioprinting technology aims to become a fundamental tool for tissue regeneration using cell-loaded hydrogels. These biomaterials must have highly specific mechanical and biological properties that allow them to generate biosimilar structures by successive layering of material while maintaining cell viability. The rheological properties of hydrogels used as bioinks are critical to their printability. Correct printability of hydrogels allows the replication of biomimetic structures, which are of great use in medicine, tissue engineering and other fields of study that require the three-dimensional replication of different tissues. When bioprinting cell-loaded hydrogels, a small amount of culture medium can be added to ensure adequate survival, which can modify the rheological properties of the hydrogels. GelMA is a hydrogel used in bioprinting, with very interesting properties and rheological parameters that have been studied and defined for its basic formulation. However, the changes that occur in its rheological parameters and therefore in its printability, when it is mixed with the culture medium necessary to house the cells inside, are unknown. Therefore, in this work, a comparative study of GelMA 100% and GelMA in the proportions 3:1 (GelMA 75%) and 1:1 (GelMA 50%) with culture medium was carried out to determine the printability of the gel (using a device of our own invention), its main rheological parameters and its toxicity after the addition of the medium and to observe whether significant differences in cell viability occur. This raises the possibility of its use in regenerative medicine using a 3D extrusion bioprinter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D and 4D Printing of Polymers: Modeling and Experimental Approaches)
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