Conductive Polymers for Smart Textile Applications

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Polymer Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 2809

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Textile Machinery and High Performance Material Technology, Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden, Germany
Interests: fibers and polymers; smart textiles and structures; biotextiles; composite materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Institute of Textile Machinery and High Performance Material Technology, Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden, Germany
Interests: smart textiles and structures; sensors; actuators; measurement technology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Textile Machinery and High Performance Material Technology, Technische Universitat Dresden, Dresden, Germany
Interests: fibers; polymers; conductive polymers; smart fibers; spinning technique

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue investigates the development of novel fibre-based smart systems based on conductive polymers. In this context, conductive polymers are understood to be both intrinsically and composite-based conductive polymer systems processed by either spinning technology in a fibre configuration or by coating technology within a fibre/textile structure. The applications addressed include sensor, actuator, heating, data and energy transfer functions, e.g., in human–machine interfaces, cyber–physical systems, or smart composite systems.

Therefore, the focus of the contribution may be on (i) the material level regarding chemical aspects of polymer synthesis, surface and interface modification, or the compounding of conductive polymers; (ii) the technology level regarding aspects of processing and specific machinery; and (iii) the system level involving the presentation of complete functional smart textile systems for technical and medical applications, including test stands and test scenarios.

Prof. Dr. Chokri Cherif
Dr. Andreas Nocke
Dr. Iris Kruppke
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • conductive polymers
  • smart fibres
  • smart textiles
  • smart composites
  • spinning technique
  • coating technique
  • surface functionalization
  • human–machine interface
  • cyber physical systems

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 9280 KiB  
Article
Structural Health Monitoring of Fiber Reinforced Composites Using Integrated a Linear Capacitance Based Sensor
by Khalid S. Alblalaihid, Saad A. Aldoihi and Abdulaziz A. Alharbi
Polymers 2024, 16(11), 1560; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym16111560 - 31 May 2024
Viewed by 283
Abstract
The demand for fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs) has significantly increased in various industries due to their attributes, including low weight, high strength, corrosion resistance, and cost-efficiency. Nevertheless, FRPs, such as glass and Kevlar fiber composites, exhibit anisotropic properties and relatively low interlaminar strength, rendering [...] Read more.
The demand for fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs) has significantly increased in various industries due to their attributes, including low weight, high strength, corrosion resistance, and cost-efficiency. Nevertheless, FRPs, such as glass and Kevlar fiber composites, exhibit anisotropic properties and relatively low interlaminar strength, rendering them susceptible to undetected damage. The integration of real-time damage detection processes can effectively mitigate this issue. This paper introduces a novel method for fabricating embedded capacitive sensors within FRPs using a coating technique. The study encompasses two types of fibers, namely glass and Kevlar fiber/epoxy composites. The physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique is employed to coat bundle fibers with conductive material, thus creating embedded electrodes. The results demonstrate the uniform distribution of nanoparticles of gold (Au) along the fibers using PVD, resulting in a favorable resistance of approximately ≈100 Ω. Two sensor configurations are explored: axial and lateral embedding of the coated yarn (electrodes) to investigate the influence of load direction on the coating yarn. Axial-sensor configuration specimens undergo tensile testing, showcasing a linear response to axial loads with average sensitivities of 1 for glass and 1.5 for Kevlar fiber/epoxy composites. Additionally, onset damage is detected in both types of fiber composites, occurring before final fracture, with average stress at the turning point measuring 208 MPa for glass and 144 MPa for Kevlar. The lateral-sensor configuration for glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) exhibits good linearity towards strain until failure, with average gauge factors of 0.25 and −2.44 in the x and y axes, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conductive Polymers for Smart Textile Applications)
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10 pages, 1278 KiB  
Article
Electromechanical Properties of Silver-Plated Yarns and Their Relation to Yarn Construction Parameters
by Johannes Mersch, Hans Winger, Ercan Altinsoy and Chokri Cherif
Polymers 2023, 15(21), 4210; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15214210 - 24 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1055
Abstract
For signal transmission and sensing in stretchable structures for human motion monitoring or proprioception of soft robots, textiles with electronically conductive yarns are a promising option. Many recent publications employ silver-plated yarns in knits, braids, wovens for strain or pressure sensing purposes as [...] Read more.
For signal transmission and sensing in stretchable structures for human motion monitoring or proprioception of soft robots, textiles with electronically conductive yarns are a promising option. Many recent publications employ silver-plated yarns in knits, braids, wovens for strain or pressure sensing purposes as well as heating fabrics or twisted string actuators. Silver-plated yarns are available in a wide range of base materials, yarn counts and twists. These structural properties significantly influence the electrical and electromechanical behavior of such yarns. However, until now little research has been carried out on the yarns themselves. To close this research gap, several variations of a single yarn type are electromechanically characterized. Additionally, tensile tests with synchronous resistance measurements are performed. From these measurements, sensor metrics are derived and calculated to compare the different variants quantitatively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conductive Polymers for Smart Textile Applications)
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13 pages, 34378 KiB  
Article
Advancing Smart Textiles: Structural Evolution of Knitted Piezoresistive Strain Sensors for Enabling Precise Motion Capture
by Mareen N. Warncke, Carola H. Böhmer, Carmen Sachse, Susanne Fischer, Eric Häntzsche, Andreas Nocke, Johannes Mersch and Chokri Cherif
Polymers 2023, 15(19), 3936; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15193936 - 29 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 930
Abstract
Recently, there has been remarkable progress in the development of smart textiles, especially knitted strain sensors, to achieve reliable sensor signals. Stable and reliable electro-mechanical properties of sensors are essential for using textile-based sensors in medical applications. However, the challenges associated with significant [...] Read more.
Recently, there has been remarkable progress in the development of smart textiles, especially knitted strain sensors, to achieve reliable sensor signals. Stable and reliable electro-mechanical properties of sensors are essential for using textile-based sensors in medical applications. However, the challenges associated with significant hysteresis and low gauge factor (GF) values remain for using strain sensors for motion capture. To evaluate these issues, a comprehensive investigation of the cyclic electro-mechanical properties of weft-knitted strain sensors was conducted in the present study to develop a drift-free elastic strain sensor with a robust sensor signal for motion capture for medical devices. Several variables are considered in the study, including the variation of the basic knit pattern, the incorporation of the electrically conductive yarn, and the size of the strain sensor. The effectiveness and feasibility of the developed knitted strain sensors are demonstrated through an experimental evaluation, by determining the gauge factor, its nonlinearity, hysteresis, and drift. The developed knitted piezoresistive strain sensors have a GF of 2.4, a calculated drift of 50%, 12.5% hysteresis, and 0.3% nonlinearity in parts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Conductive Polymers for Smart Textile Applications)
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