Special Issue "Selected Papers from the XXIII Meeting of the Spanish Society of Plant Physiology and the XVI Hispano-Portuguese Congress of Plant Physiology (FV2019)"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jorge Lozano-Juste
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Guest Editor
Institute for Plant Molecular and Cell Biology, IBMCP, Valencia, Spain
Interests: growth; development; hormone signalling; chemical genomics; drug discovery; ABA signalling; drought stress
Dr. Javier Pozueta-Romero
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Guest Editor
Institute of Agrobiotechnology, IdAB, Navarra, Spain
Interests: metabolism; plant-microbe interaction; starch, plant biotechnology
Dr. Ainhoa Martínez-Medina
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Guest Editor
Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología de Salamanca
Interests: plant-other organisms interactions
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Antonio Díaz-Espejo
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Guest Editor
Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology, IRNAS, Seville, Spain
Interests: photosynthesis; stomatal conductance; mesophyll conductance; leaf hydraulics; process-based models; plant water relations; precision agriculture; applied plant physiology
Dr. J. Carlos del Pozo
Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Biotecnología y Genomica de Plantas CBGP (UPM-INIA)
Interests: abiotic stress; root development; phosphate starvation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will comprise selected, extended papers from the XXIII Meeting of the Spanish Society of Plant Physiology and the XVI Hispano-Portuguese Congress of Plant Physiology (FV2019) to be held in Pamplona, Spain, on 26–28 June 2019 (https://www.fv2019.org). Selected contributions will address a wide range of topics in plant biology, covering very different aspects presented and discussed at the meeting, such as metabolism and biochemistry, applied plant physiology and molecular breeding, ecophysiology and climate change, interaction of plants with other organisms, photosynthesis, crop production, abiotic stress, biofertilizers, biostimulants and mineral nutrition, systems biology and omics, growth and development, signaling and plant biotechnology. Contributors are welcome to submit original research, method, opinion, and review articles related to the topics covered in FV2019. Submissions to this Special Issue are accepted from the conference attendees and their co-authors. Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subjected to a rigorous peer-review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments, and applications.

Dr. Jorge Lozano-Juste
Dr. Javier Pozueta-Romero
Dr. Ainhoa Martínez-Medina
Dr. Antonio Díaz-Espejo
Dr. J. Carlos del Pozo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • selected/extended papers from FV2019
  • metabolism and biochemistry
  • applied plant physiology and molecular breeding
  • ecophysiology and climate change
  • interaction of plants with other organisms
  • photosynthesis, water relations and crop production
  • abiotic stress
  • biofertilizers, biostimulants and mineral nutrition
  • systems biology and omics
  • growth and development
  • plant biotechnology and synthetic biology
  • signalling

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Leaf Water Relations in Lime Trees Grown under Shade Netting and Open-Air
Plants 2020, 9(4), 510; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040510 - 15 Apr 2020
Abstract
Physiological plant water status indicators are useful for managing precision irrigation in regions with limited water resources. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of shade netting on the diurnal and seasonal variations of several plant water status indicators in [...] Read more.
Physiological plant water status indicators are useful for managing precision irrigation in regions with limited water resources. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of shade netting on the diurnal and seasonal variations of several plant water status indicators in young lime trees (Citrus latifolia Tan., cv. Bearss), grown at the CEBAS-CSIC experimental station in Murcia, Spain. Stem water potential (Ψstem), leaf gas exchange (net photosynthesis (Pn) and stomatal conductance (gs)), and canopy temperature (Tc) were measured on representative days of winter and summer. The Ψstem daily pattern was quite similar in both seasons under both conditions. However, the circadian rhythm of leaf gas exchange was affected by shade conditions, especially in summer, when shaded leaves showed maximum gs values for a longer time, allowing higher net photosynthesis (37%). Canopy temperature behaved similarly in both conditions, nevertheless, lower values were recorded in open-air than in shaded trees in the two seasons. The canopy-to-air temperature difference (Tc − Ta), however, was lower in shaded trees during the daylight hours, indicating the higher degree of leaf cooling that was facilitated by high gs values. The possibility of continuously recording Tc makes it (or the proposed canopy thermal index, CTI) a promising index for precise irrigation scheduling. Shade netting was seen to favour gas exchange, suggesting that it may be considered alternative to open-air for use in semi-arid areas threatened by climate change. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Growth and Development of Stevia Cuttings During Propagation with Hormones in Different Months of the Year
Plants 2020, 9(3), 294; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9030294 - 01 Mar 2020
Abstract
Stevia is an important non-caloric sweetener that has health-beneficial properties. The objective is to evaluate growth, development, and rooting of stevia plants during different seasons of the year using growth hormones. Eight experiments were set up in Ciudad Guzman, Jalisco, Mexico, with three [...] Read more.
Stevia is an important non-caloric sweetener that has health-beneficial properties. The objective is to evaluate growth, development, and rooting of stevia plants during different seasons of the year using growth hormones. Eight experiments were set up in Ciudad Guzman, Jalisco, Mexico, with three treatments (T): T1, indol-3 butyric acid (IBA) 7.4 mM; T2, alphanaphthylacetamide (ANA) 6.4 mM + IBA 0.3 mM; and T3, control. The variables evaluated were rooted plantlets, plant height, root length, number of leaves, stem diameter, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight, root dry weight, leaf area, shoot biomass, total biomass, as well as development and growth indexes. Four samplings were conducted in each experiment. The results show that the most appropriate months for propagating stevia cuttings are February, March, April, May, and July, when 96% to 99% of the cuttings rooted. The hormones had the best results related to production of root development. The control was outstanding only in variables related to production of shoot biomass and not to root development. It is concluded that stevia can be propagated vegetatively using cuttings treated with IBA 7.4 mM or ANA 6.4 mM + IBA 0.3 mM, preferable in the period from February to July, with the exception of June. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Alternative Polyadenylation and Salicylic Acid Modulate Root Responses to Low Nitrogen Availability
Plants 2020, 9(2), 251; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9020251 - 16 Feb 2020
Abstract
Nitrogen (N) is probably the most important macronutrient and its scarcity limits plant growth, development and fitness. N starvation response has been largely studied by transcriptomic analyses, but little is known about the role of alternative polyadenylation (APA) in such response. In this [...] Read more.
Nitrogen (N) is probably the most important macronutrient and its scarcity limits plant growth, development and fitness. N starvation response has been largely studied by transcriptomic analyses, but little is known about the role of alternative polyadenylation (APA) in such response. In this work, we show that N starvation modifies poly(A) usage in a large number of transcripts, some of them mediated by FIP1, a component of the polyadenylation machinery. Interestingly, the number of mRNAs isoforms with poly(A) tags located in protein-coding regions or 5′-UTRs significantly increases in response to N starvation. The set of genes affected by APA in response to N deficiency is enriched in N-metabolism, oxidation-reduction processes, response to stresses, and hormone responses, among others. A hormone profile analysis shows that the levels of salicylic acid (SA), a phytohormone that reduces nitrate accumulation and root growth, increase significantly upon N starvation. Meta-analyses of APA-affected and fip1-2-deregulated genes indicate a connection between the nitrogen starvation response and salicylic acid (SA) signaling. Genetic analyses show that SA may be important for preventing the overgrowth of the root system in low N environments. This work provides new insights on how plants interconnect different pathways, such as defense-related hormonal signaling and the regulation of genomic information by APA, to fine-tune the response to low N availability. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Regulated Deficit Irrigation and Environmental Conditions on Reproductive Response of Sweet Cherry Trees
Plants 2020, 9(1), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9010094 - 11 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The reproductive response of fifteen year old sweet cherry trees (Prunus avium L.) combination ‘Prime Giant’/SL64 under Mediterranean climate to deficit irrigation was studied in a commercial orchard in south-eastern Spain for four seasons. Three irrigation treatments were assayed: (i) control treatment, [...] Read more.
The reproductive response of fifteen year old sweet cherry trees (Prunus avium L.) combination ‘Prime Giant’/SL64 under Mediterranean climate to deficit irrigation was studied in a commercial orchard in south-eastern Spain for four seasons. Three irrigation treatments were assayed: (i) control treatment, irrigated without restrictions at 110% of seasonal crop evapotranspiration; (ii) sustained deficit irrigation treatment, irrigated at 85% ETc during pre-harvest and post-harvest periods, and at 100% ETc during floral differentiation, and (iii) regulated deficit irrigation treatment, irrigated at 100% ETc during pre-harvest and floral differentiation and at 55% ETc during post-harvest. The duration and intensity of the phenological phases of sweet cherry trees, including cold accumulation, flowering, fruit set or fruit and vegetative growth, were assessed to ascertain whether the different irrigation strategies imposed affect the trees’ reproductive response (fruit yield, fruit size, leaf area, fruit physiological disturbances, and starch and soluble carbohydrates stock) in the same season or have a negative effect in the next season. Deficit irrigation did not advance, enhance or penalize flowering, fruit set or fruit growth. Neither did it diminish carbohydrate concentration in roots or cause an increase in the number of double fruits, which was more linked to high temperatures after harvest. However, deficit irrigation decreased vegetative growth and consequently the leaf area/fruit ratio, which, when it fell below 180 cm2 fruit−1, affected cherry size. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Aminoacids and Flavonoids Profiling in Tempranillo Berries Can Be Modulated by the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi
Plants 2019, 8(10), 400; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8100400 - 08 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
(1) Background: Vitis vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo is cultivated over the world for its wine of high quality. The association of Tempranillo with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) induced the accumulation of phenolics and carotenoids in leaves, affected the metabolism of abscisic acid (ABA) [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Vitis vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo is cultivated over the world for its wine of high quality. The association of Tempranillo with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) induced the accumulation of phenolics and carotenoids in leaves, affected the metabolism of abscisic acid (ABA) during berry ripening, and modulated some characteristics and quality aspects of grapes. The objective of this study was to elucidate if AMF influenced the profiles and the content of primary and secondary metabolites determinants for berry quality in Tempranillo. (2) Methods: Fruit-bearing cuttings inoculated with AMF or uninoculated were cultivated under controlled conditions. (3) Results: Mycorrhizal symbiosis modified the profile of metabolites in Tempranillo berries, especially those of the primary compounds. The levels of glucose and amino acids clearly increased in berries of mycorrhized Tempranillo grapevines, including those of the aromatic precursor amino acids. However, mycorrhizal inoculation barely influenced the total amount and the profiles of anthocyanins and flavonols in berries. (4) Conclusions: Mycorrhizal inoculation of Tempranillo grapevines may be an alternative to the exogenous application of nitrogen compounds in order to enhance the contents of amino acids in grapes, which may affect the aromatic characteristics of wines. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Plant Defenses Against Tetranychus urticae: Mind the Gaps
Plants 2020, 9(4), 464; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040464 - 07 Apr 2020
Abstract
The molecular interactions between a pest and its host plant are the consequence of an evolutionary arms race based on the perception of the phytophagous arthropod by the plant and the different strategies adopted by the pest to overcome plant triggered defenses. The [...] Read more.
The molecular interactions between a pest and its host plant are the consequence of an evolutionary arms race based on the perception of the phytophagous arthropod by the plant and the different strategies adopted by the pest to overcome plant triggered defenses. The complexity and the different levels of these interactions make it difficult to get a wide knowledge of the whole process. Extensive research in model species is an accurate way to progressively move forward in this direction. The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch has become a model species for phytophagous mites due to the development of a great number of genetic tools and a high-quality genome sequence. This review is an update of the current state of the art in the molecular interactions between the generalist pest T. urticae and its host plants. The knowledge of the physical and chemical constitutive defenses of the plant and the mechanisms involved in the induction of plant defenses are summarized. The molecular events produced from plant perception to the synthesis of defense compounds are detailed, with a special focus on the key steps that are little or totally uncovered by previous research. Full article
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Other

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Open AccessProtocol
Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting Using the D-Root Device and Optimization for Scarce and/or Non-Accessible Root Cell Populations
Plants 2020, 9(4), 499; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040499 - 14 Apr 2020
Abstract
Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is a technique used to isolate specific cell populations based on characteristics detected by flow cytometry. FACS has been broadly used in transcriptomic analyses of individual cell types during development or under different environmental conditions. Different protoplast extraction protocols [...] Read more.
Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is a technique used to isolate specific cell populations based on characteristics detected by flow cytometry. FACS has been broadly used in transcriptomic analyses of individual cell types during development or under different environmental conditions. Different protoplast extraction protocols are available for plant roots; however, they were designed for accessible cell populations, which normally were grown in the presence of light, a non-natural and stressful environment for roots. Here, we report a protocol using FACS to isolate root protoplasts from Arabidopsis green fluorescent protein (GFP)-marked lines using the minimum number of enzymes necessary for an optimal yield, and with the root system grown in darkness in the D-Root device. This device mimics natural conditions as the shoot grows in the presence of light while the roots grow in darkness. In addition, we optimized this protocol for specific patterns of scarce cell types inside more differentiated tissues using the mCherry fluorescent protein. We provide detailed experimental protocols for effective protoplasting, subsequent purification through FACS, and RNA extraction. Using this RNA, we generated cDNA and sequencing libraries, proving that our methods can be used for genome-wide transcriptomic analyses of any cell-type from roots grown in darkness. Full article
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