Special Issue "2019 Feature Papers by Plants’ Editorial Board Members"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dilantha Fernando

Department of Plant Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 204 474 7528
Interests: canola and wheat pathology; epidemiology of plant pathogens; evolution/genetic variation of fungal pathogens; biological control of plant diseases; breeding for disease resistance microbial; ecology and microbial interactions
Guest Editor
Dr. Shuanglong Huang

Department of Plant Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: plant physiology; plant anaerobiosis; plant development and morphogenesis; plant-pathogen interactions; phytoglobins; nitric oxide signaling; hormone signaling; cell fate specification; programmed cell death; functional genomics; gene editing and regulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This is a Special Issue of high-quality papers in open access form by the Editorial Board Members, or those recommended and invited by the Editorial Board Members and the Editor-in-Chief. Authors can submit their manuscripts through the Manuscript Tracking System at https://susy.mdpi.com/user/manuscripts/upload?journal=plants.

Prof. Dr. Dilantha Fernando
Dr. Shuanglong Huang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Morphological and Chemical Profile of Three Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Landraces of A Semi-Arid Mediterranean Environment
Received: 20 June 2019 / Revised: 15 July 2019 / Accepted: 6 August 2019 / Published: 8 August 2019
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Abstract
Puglia (Southern Italy), particularly rich in tomato agro-biodiversity, can be considered a typical region of the semi-arid Mediterranean environments. In this study, three local varieties of tomato (Manduria, Giallo di Crispiano and Regina) were characterized by using morphological descriptors according to international standards. [...] Read more.
Puglia (Southern Italy), particularly rich in tomato agro-biodiversity, can be considered a typical region of the semi-arid Mediterranean environments. In this study, three local varieties of tomato (Manduria, Giallo di Crispiano and Regina) were characterized by using morphological descriptors according to international standards. Chemical (isoprenoids, ascorbic acid, total phenols, sugars and mineral content) and agronomic assessment were carried out to highlight the specific traits of these local varieties well adapted to a semi-arid environment. Data of morphological traits according to the “International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants” (UPOV) guideline evidenced a clear distinctness among all three landraces, especially as regards fruits. Results also highlighted that a great part of variation in chemical traits was almost exclusively due to genotypes, while in a few cases observed differences resulted from the interaction between genotype and harvest time. The results of the present study may represent the first step toward the recognition of “conservation variety” status for Regina, Giallo di Crispiano and Manduria tomato landraces. At the same time, both quality traits and agronomic performance of these tomato genotypes suggest the possibility of their cultivation in other semi-arid environments also considering their quality traits, in view of a sustainable production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2019 Feature Papers by Plants’ Editorial Board Members)
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Open AccessArticle
Temporal, Plant Part, and Interpopulation Variability of Secondary Metabolites and Antioxidant Activity of Inula helenium L.
Received: 3 June 2019 / Revised: 11 June 2019 / Accepted: 15 June 2019 / Published: 17 June 2019
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Abstract
Variations in abiotic environmental factors have significant effects on quantity and quality of secondary metabolites, which is particularly important for plant species that possess biologically active compounds. The purpose of this study is determination of the total phenolic content, flavonoid concentration, and antioxidant [...] Read more.
Variations in abiotic environmental factors have significant effects on quantity and quality of secondary metabolites, which is particularly important for plant species that possess biologically active compounds. The purpose of this study is determination of the total phenolic content, flavonoid concentration, and antioxidant activity of the different parts of Inula helenium L. (Asteraceae) sampled from different populations and in different time periods. The amounts obtained for the total phenolics varied from 16.73 to 89.85 mg of gallic acid (GA)/g. The concentration of flavonoids ranged from 9.32 to 376.22 mg of rutin (Ru)/g. The IC50 values of antioxidant activity determined using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical method varied from 161.60 to 1563.02 μg/ml. The inflorescence and roots possessed high concentration of phenolic compounds and significant antioxidant activity, while leaves contained the highest concentration of flavonoids. Additionally, the quantity of the phenolics, as well as antioxidant activity, significantly varied among the different populations due to different impacts of environmental factors. This research showed that I. helenium represents an abundant source of bioactive substances, and that the quantity of these compounds greatly differs among the different populations as well as in the same populations regarding the different time periods as well as plant parts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2019 Feature Papers by Plants’ Editorial Board Members)
Open AccessArticle
Factors Affecting the Regeneration, via Organogenesis, and the Selection of Transgenic Calli in the Peach Rootstock Hansen 536 (Prunus persica × Prunus amygdalus) to Express an RNAi Construct against PPV Virus
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 13 June 2019 / Accepted: 15 June 2019 / Published: 17 June 2019
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Abstract
Prunus spp. is one of the most recalcitrant fruit tree species in terms of in vitro regeneration and transformation, mostly when mature tissues are used as explants. The present study describes the in vitro regeneration via indirect organogenesis, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation [...] Read more.
Prunus spp. is one of the most recalcitrant fruit tree species in terms of in vitro regeneration and transformation, mostly when mature tissues are used as explants. The present study describes the in vitro regeneration via indirect organogenesis, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of the peach rootstock Hansen 536 (Prunus persica × Prunus amygdalus) through the use of meristematic bulks (MBs) as starting explants. Efficient adventitious shoot regeneration was obtained when Hansen 536 MBs were cultured on an optimized medium consisting of modified McCown Woody Plant medium (WPM) enriched with 4.4 μM 6-Benzyladenine (BA), 0.1 μM 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6.0 g L−1 plant agar S1000 (B&V). MB slices were used later as starting explants for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to introduce an RNAi construct “ihp35S-PPV194” against PPV virus. Transgenic events were identified by both green fluorescent protein (GFP) screening and kanamycin selection at different concentrations (0, 17 or 42 μM). GFP-fluorescent proliferating callus lines were selected and confirmed to stably express the ihp35S-PPV194::eGFP gene construct by molecular analysis. Although shoot regeneration from these transgenic calli has not been obtained yet, this represents one of the few examples of successful attempts in peach genetic transformation from somatic tissues, and also serves as a useful in vitro system for future gene functional analysis in peach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2019 Feature Papers by Plants’ Editorial Board Members)
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Open AccessArticle
Transcriptomic Analysis Identifies New Non-Target Site Glyphosate-Resistance Genes in Conyza bonariensis
Received: 4 May 2019 / Revised: 31 May 2019 / Accepted: 4 June 2019 / Published: 7 June 2019
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Abstract
Conyza bonariensis (hairy fleabane) is one of the most problematic and widespread glyphosate-resistant weeds in the world. This highly competitive weed species significantly interferes with crop growth and substantially decreases crop yield. Despite its agricultural importance, the molecular mechanisms of glyphosate resistance are [...] Read more.
Conyza bonariensis (hairy fleabane) is one of the most problematic and widespread glyphosate-resistant weeds in the world. This highly competitive weed species significantly interferes with crop growth and substantially decreases crop yield. Despite its agricultural importance, the molecular mechanisms of glyphosate resistance are still unknown. The present RNA-Seq study was performed with the goal of identifying differentially expressed candidate transcripts (genes) related to metabolism-based non-target site glyphosate resistance in C. bonariensis. The whole-transcriptome was de novo assembled from glyphosate-resistant and -sensitive biotypes of C. bonariensis from Southern Brazil. The RNA was extracted from untreated and glyphosate-treated plants at several timepoints up to 288 h after treatment in both biotypes. The transcriptome assembly produced 90,124 contigs with an average length of 777 bp and N50 of 1118 bp. In response to glyphosate treatment, differential gene expression analysis was performed on glyphosate-resistant and -sensitive biotypes. A total of 9622 genes were differentially expressed as a response to glyphosate treatment in both biotypes, 4297 (44.6%) being up- and 5325 (55.4%) down-regulated. The resistant biotype presented 1770 up- and 2333 down-regulated genes while the sensitive biotype had 2335 and 2800 up- and down-regulated genes, respectively. Among them, 974 up- and 1290 down-regulated genes were co-expressed in both biotypes. In the present work, we identified 41 new candidate target genes from five families related to herbicide transport and metabolism: 19 ABC transporters, 10 CYP450s, one glutathione S-transferase (GST), five glycosyltransferases (GT), and six genes related to antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). The candidate genes may participate in metabolic-based glyphosate resistance via oxidation, conjugation, transport, and degradation, plus antioxidation. One or more of these genes might ‘rescue’ resistant plants from irreversible damage after glyphosate treatment. The 41 target genes we report in the present study may inform further functional genomics studies, including gene editing approaches to elucidate glyphosate-resistance mechanisms in C. bonariensis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2019 Feature Papers by Plants’ Editorial Board Members)
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