Special Issue "Cell Separation Processes in Plant Development and Environmental Adaptation"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Physiology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Reidunn Birgitta Aalen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo, Norway
Interests: peptide signalling; cell separation; abscission; cell-to-cell communication
Assoc. Prof. Melinka A. Butenko
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo, Norway
Tel. +47-22854573
Interests: peptide ligand–receptor interactions; floral abscission; developmental biology; biotic and abiotic responses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The wall surrounding plant cells provides support and protection. However, the presence of a wall also hampers cell growth and prevents cell movement. During several stages of development and in response to abiotic and biotic stresses it is therefore necessary for plants to modulate their cell walls. In certain cases, such as during the formation of stomata, during the sloughing of root cap cells or during lateral root emergence the remodeling of the cell wall leads to separation of adjacent cells. The process of cell separation is also required during abscission, when entire plant organs that have served their purpose or have been injured or infected are lost, and when fruits and seeds are detached from the mother plant. As such, abscission has large agricultural implication for plant growth, production yield and postharvest storage.

This Special Issue of Plants will focus on cell separation events during plant development, in reproduction and in defense. We welcome articles (original research papers, perspectives, hypotheses, opinions, reviews, modeling approaches and methods) elucidating cell separation processes in different organs of model species and crops from different perspectives, like evolution, genetics, development, biochemistry, and –omic studies.

Prof. Reidunn Birgitta Aalen
Assoc. Prof. Melinka A. Butenko
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • abscission
  • cell separation
  • organ loss

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
The PIP Peptide of INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION Enhances Populus Leaf and Elaeis guineensis Fruit Abscission
Plants 2019, 8(6), 143; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8060143 - 30 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The programmed loss of a plant organ is called abscission, which is an important cell separation process that occurs with different organs throughout the life of a plant. The use of floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis thaliana as a model has allowed greater [...] Read more.
The programmed loss of a plant organ is called abscission, which is an important cell separation process that occurs with different organs throughout the life of a plant. The use of floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis thaliana as a model has allowed greater understanding of the complexities of organ abscission, but whether the regulatory pathways are conserved throughout the plant kingdom and for all organ abscission types is unknown. One important pathway that has attracted much attention involves a peptide ligand-receptor signalling system that consists of the secreted peptide IDA (INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION) and at least two leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor-like kinases (RLK), HAESA (HAE) and HAESA-LIKE2 (HSL2). In the current study we examine the bioactive potential of IDA peptides in two different abscission processes, leaf abscission in Populus and ripe fruit abscission in oil palm, and find in both cases treatment with IDA peptides enhances cell separation and abscission of both organ types. Our results provide evidence to suggest that the IDA–HAE–HSL2 pathway is conserved and functions in these phylogenetically divergent dicot and monocot species during both leaf and fruit abscission, respectively. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Control of Organ Abscission and Other Cell Separation Processes by Evolutionary Conserved Peptide Signaling
Plants 2019, 8(7), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8070225 - 15 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Plants both generate and shed organs throughout their lifetime. Cell separation is in function during opening of anthers to release pollen; floral organs are detached after pollination when they have served their purpose; unfertilized flowers are shed; fruits and seeds are abscised from [...] Read more.
Plants both generate and shed organs throughout their lifetime. Cell separation is in function during opening of anthers to release pollen; floral organs are detached after pollination when they have served their purpose; unfertilized flowers are shed; fruits and seeds are abscised from the mother plant to secure the propagation of new generations. Organ abscission takes place in specialized abscission zone (AZ) cells where the middle lamella between adjacent cell files is broken down. The plant hormone ethylene has a well-documented promoting effect on abscission, but mutation in ethylene receptor genes in Arabidopsis thaliana only delays the abscission process. Microarray and RNA sequencing have identified a large number of genes differentially expressed in the AZs, especially genes encoding enzymes involved in cell wall remodelling and disassembly. Mutations in such genes rarely give a phenotype, most likely due to functional redundancy. In contrast, mutation in the INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA) blocks floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis. IDA encodes a small peptide that signals through the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases HAESA (HAE) and HAE-LIKE2 (HSL2) to control floral organ abscission and facilitate lateral root emergence. Untimely abscission is a severe problem in many crops, and in a more applied perspective, it is of interest to investigate whether IDA-HAE/HSL2 is involved in other cell separation processes and other species. Genes encoding IDA and HSL2 orthologues have been identified in all orders of flowering plants. Angiosperms have had enormous success, with species adapted to all kinds of environments, adaptations which include variation with respect to which organs they shed. Here we review, from an evolutionary perspective, the properties of the IDA-HAE/HSL2 signaling module and the evidence for its hypothesized involvement in various cell separation processes in angiosperms. Full article
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Open AccessReview
The Yes and No of the Ethylene Involvement in Abscission
Plants 2019, 8(6), 187; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8060187 - 25 Jun 2019
Abstract
Abscission has significant implications in agriculture and several efforts have been addressed by researchers to understand its regulatory steps in both model and crop species. Among the main players in abscission, ethylene has exhibited some fascinating features, in that it was shown to [...] Read more.
Abscission has significant implications in agriculture and several efforts have been addressed by researchers to understand its regulatory steps in both model and crop species. Among the main players in abscission, ethylene has exhibited some fascinating features, in that it was shown to be involved at different stages of abscission induction and, in some cases, with interesting roles also within the abscising organ at the very early stages of the process. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the role of ethylene both at the level of the abscission zone and within the shedding organ, pointing out the missing pieces of the very complicated puzzle of the abscission process in the different species. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Transcriptional Regulation of Abscission Zones
Plants 2019, 8(6), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8060154 - 06 Jun 2019
Abstract
Precise and timely regulation of organ separation from the parent plant (abscission) is consequential to improvement of crop productivity as it influences both the timing of harvest and fruit quality. Abscission is tightly associated with plant fitness as unwanted organs (petals, sepals, filaments) [...] Read more.
Precise and timely regulation of organ separation from the parent plant (abscission) is consequential to improvement of crop productivity as it influences both the timing of harvest and fruit quality. Abscission is tightly associated with plant fitness as unwanted organs (petals, sepals, filaments) are shed after fertilization while seeds, fruits, and leaves are cast off as means of reproductive success or in response to abiotic/biotic stresses. Floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis has been a useful model to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that underlie the separation processes, and multiple abscission signals associated with the activation and downstream pathways have been uncovered. Concomitantly, large-scale analyses of omics studies in diverse abscission systems of various plants have added valuable insights into the abscission process. The results suggest that there are common molecular events linked to the biosynthesis of a new extracellular matrix as well as cell wall disassembly. Comparative analysis between Arabidopsis and soybean abscission systems has revealed shared and yet disparate regulatory modules that affect the separation processes. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the transcriptional regulation of abscission in several different plants that has improved on the previously proposed four-phased model of organ separation. Full article
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