Microalgal–Bacterial Interactions: Biomolecular Meaning and Biotechnological Applications

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics, Genomics and Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 3504

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Engineering, School of Environment, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130117, China
Interests: environmental biological technology; wastewater treatment; microalgal biotechnology; microalgal reclamation and energization; microalgal soil remediation; microalgae–bacteria interactions; environmental engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Marine Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209, China
Interests: MBR; membrane fouling; bacterial–microalgal consortium; mariculture wastewater treatment; microalgae bioenergy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microalgae–bacteria hold exclusive predominance for coupling engineering application with bioenergy production. Large-scale application is highly dependent on the interaction mechanism between microalgae and bacteria. Meanwhile, the distinctive photosynthesis endows this technology advantages of carbon neutrality, and fulfills the sustainable development goals for future society. Thus, we urgently encourage recent progress and advanced techniques to be published in this issue. Excellent and novel investigations are also welcome in this Special Issue, on topics including microalgae–bacteria interaction mechanisms, microalgal biotechnology, engineering application, etc.

Submissions, including review articles, letters and research articles, are welcome, on topics related but not limited to the following:

  • Bioenergy production of microalgae–bacteria consortia;
  • Efficient processing and successful technologies for a high yield of bioenergy production;
  • Interaction mechanism between microalgae and bacteria during biotechnological application;
  • Genetic engineering/gene editing of microalgae for biorefinery purposes.
  • Novel or hybrid reactor configurations for engineering application via the microalgae–bacteria consortia.
  • Life cycle or techno-economic analysis for microalgae–bacteria biotechnology application.

Dr. Chaofan Zhang
Dr. Binghan Xie
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microalgae–bactera interactions
  • symbiotic co-culture
  • interaction mechanism
  • microalgae-based biotechnology
  • microalgal wastewater treatment
  • microalgal biofuel
  • microalgal plastics
  • microalgae–bacteria symbiosis
  • microalgae–bacteria consortia
  • carbon neutralization

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

21 pages, 2186 KiB  
Review
Microalgal and Nitrogen-Fixing Bacterial Consortia: From Interaction to Biotechnological Potential
by Angel Llamas, Esperanza Leon-Miranda and Manuel Tejada-Jimenez
Plants 2023, 12(13), 2476; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12132476 - 28 Jun 2023
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3219
Abstract
Microalgae are used in various biotechnological processes, such as biofuel production due to their high biomass yields, agriculture as biofertilizers, production of high-value-added products, decontamination of wastewater, or as biological models for carbon sequestration. The number of these biotechnological applications is increasing, and [...] Read more.
Microalgae are used in various biotechnological processes, such as biofuel production due to their high biomass yields, agriculture as biofertilizers, production of high-value-added products, decontamination of wastewater, or as biological models for carbon sequestration. The number of these biotechnological applications is increasing, and as such, any advances that contribute to reducing costs and increasing economic profitability can have a significant impact. Nitrogen fixing organisms, often called diazotroph, also have great biotechnological potential, mainly in agriculture as an alternative to chemical fertilizers. Microbial consortia typically perform more complex tasks than monocultures and can execute functions that are challenging or even impossible for individual strains or species. Interestingly, microalgae and diazotrophic organisms are capable to embrace different types of symbiotic associations. Certain corals and lichens exhibit this symbiotic relationship in nature, which enhances their fitness. However, this relationship can also be artificially created in laboratory conditions with the objective of enhancing some of the biotechnological processes that each organism carries out independently. As a result, the utilization of microalgae and diazotrophic organisms in consortia is garnering significant interest as a potential alternative for reducing production costs and increasing yields of microalgae biomass, as well as for producing derived products and serving biotechnological purposes. This review makes an effort to examine the associations of microalgae and diazotrophic organisms, with the aim of highlighting the potential of these associations in improving various biotechnological processes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop