Advances in Converting Citrus Wastes into Value-Added Products

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 7485

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongbuk 38541, Republic of Korea
Interests: electrochemistry and materials science; polymers and energy materials; phytochemicals; plant biochemistry; foods

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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Science, Mizoram University, Mizoram 796004, India
Interests: heavy metal pollution;environmental pollution;environmental monitoring;soil science;heavy metals; environmental science; biodiversity; landscape ecology; sustainable development; aquatic ecosystems

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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj 16278, Saudi Arabia
Interests: synthesis and biological Evaluation of heterocyclic compounds; anticonvulsant; anticancer; antioxidant; wound healing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The journal Plants will be publishing a Special Issue on “Advances in Converting Citrus Wastes into Value-Added Products”. Citrus are the  world’s largest grown fruit crop and post processing of citrus fruits leaves approximately half (45-55%) of the fruit as waste which is largely inedible. Dumping of untreated waste creates environmental pollution and health hazards. On the other hand valorization of this waste has been found to produce encouraging results in terms of materials and economy. Extraction, purification and characterization of important phytochemical molecules, such as polyphenols, carotenoids, limonene and essential oils, pectin, seed oils, etc., extracted from citrus wastes through modern extraction and purification techniques have been extensively explored in the current time. Furthermore, the research on corresponding metabolites and derived products, have garnered huge interest beyond traditional medicines at domestic levels and expanded immensely into clinical, pharmacological, cosmetic and even industrial levels. Indeed, natural products are extremely rich sources of important phytochemicals and functional biomolecules which are useful for a multitude of applications ranging from general health supplements, food additives; nutraceutical and pharmaceutical formulations, digestives; biopolymers and functional polymeric blends derived from limonene; synthetic chemicals; products from biotransformation of citrus wastes, such as biofuels (biomethane, bioethanol), enzymes, organic acids, pre-biotic, single cell proteins, and so on. In the past few decades, a wide variety of methods/techniques have emerged and are in the process of continuous development, to extract and purify pectin and essential oils for commercial purposes. The health benefits of essential oils have been adored since ancient times till today. On the other hand, with global rise in the demands by consumers for health products derived from plants and natural resources rather than artificial and synthetic means have introduced huge opportunity in the markets worldwide to receive newer materials from innovative researches. Recent progresses in the research in this regard include enhancing shelf-life of the health products, maintenance and improvement of nutritional attributes, formulation of functional products, innovation in biotechnological approaches, and constructing a global database. Thus, considering the high interest in citrus waste-derived phytochemicals and functional biomolecules as an emerging field of research for modern drug development, health and dietary supplements, biofuels and bio-organic products, this Special Issue will cover a wide variety of areas addressing citrus waste as a natural, renewable, sustainable and economic resource for the production of valuable products and aiming to contribute to the overall knowledge from several aspects.

Prof. Dr. Neelima Mahato
Dr. Prabhat Kumar Rai
Dr. Mehnaz Kamal
Prof. Dr. Francesco Meneguzzoe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Citrus waste valorization
  • Citrus essential oils
  • Pharma-and Nutraceutical molecules from citrus waste
  • Limonene and derived products
  • Citrus polyphenols
  • Carotenoids
  • Fuels from citrus waste
  • Citrus waste biotransformation
  • Citrus pectin
  • Extraction of valuable compounds from citrus waste
  • Citrus waste derived biopolymers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

32 pages, 7239 KiB  
Article
Physical Characteristics, Mineral Content, and Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities of Punica granatum or Citrus sinensis Peel Extracts and Their Applications to Improve Cake Quality
by Hossam S. El-Beltagi, Nareman S. Eshak, Heba I. Mohamed, Eslam S. A. Bendary and Amal W. Danial
Plants 2022, 11(13), 1740; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11131740 - 30 Jun 2022
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4525
Abstract
One-third of all food produced for human use is discarded as waste, resulting in environmental pollution and impaired food security. Fruit peels have bioactive compounds that may be used as antimicrobials and antioxidants, and the use of fruit peels is considered an alternative [...] Read more.
One-third of all food produced for human use is discarded as waste, resulting in environmental pollution and impaired food security. Fruit peels have bioactive compounds that may be used as antimicrobials and antioxidants, and the use of fruit peels is considered an alternative way to reduce environmental problems and agro-industrial waste. The aim of this study was to evaluate the phytochemical, mineral, extraction yield, total phenolic, total flavonoids, antioxidant, and antibacterial activity of several peel fruits, including Citrus sinensis (orange) and Punica granatum (pomegranate). The results revealed that pomegranate peel powder contains the highest amounts of ash, fiber, total carbohydrates, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Cu, while orange peel contains the highest amounts of moisture, protein, crude fat, P, and K. Furthermore, the aqueous and methanolic pomegranate peel extracts yielded higher total phenolic and total flavonoids than the orange peel extract. The identification and quantification of polyphenol compounds belonging to different classes, such as tannins, phenolic acids, and flavonoids in pomegranate peel and flavonoid compounds in orange peel were performed using UPLC-MS/MS. In addition, GC-MS analysis of orange peel essential oil discovered that the predominant compound is D-Limonene (95.7%). The aqueous and methanolic extracts of pomegranate peel were proven to be efficient against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria linked to human infections. Sponge cake substituting wheat flour with 3% pomegranate peel and 10% orange peel powder had the highest total phenolic, flavonoid compounds, and antioxidant activity as compared to the control cake. Our results concluded that pomegranate and orange peel flour can be used in cake preparation and natural food preservers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Converting Citrus Wastes into Value-Added Products)
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16 pages, 1804 KiB  
Article
Aqueous Extract from Leaves of Citrus unshiu Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in a Mouse Model of Systemic Inflammation
by Kosuke Nishi, Takako Ito, Ayumu Kadota, Momoko Ishida, Hisashi Nishiwaki, Naohiro Fukuda, Naoaki Kanamoto, Yoko Nagata and Takuya Sugahara
Plants 2021, 10(8), 1708; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081708 - 19 Aug 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2241
Abstract
Inflammation is related to various life-threatening diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic syndrome. Because macrophages are prominent inflammatory cells, regulation of macrophage activation is a key issue to control the onset of inflammation-associated diseases. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the [...] Read more.
Inflammation is related to various life-threatening diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic syndrome. Because macrophages are prominent inflammatory cells, regulation of macrophage activation is a key issue to control the onset of inflammation-associated diseases. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential anti-inflammatory activity of Citrus unshiu leaf extract (CLE) and to elucidate the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory effect. We found the inhibitory activity of CLE on the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and a chemokine from mouse macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages. The inhibitory activity of CLE was attributed to downregulated JNK, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB signaling pathways, leading to suppressed gene expression of inflammation-associated proteins. Oral administration of CLE significantly decreased the serum level of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNFα and increased that of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation mice. In addition, oral administration of CLE decreased secretion and gene expression of several proinflammatory proteins in the liver and spleen of the model mice. Overall results revealed that C. unshiu leaf is effective to attenuate inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Converting Citrus Wastes into Value-Added Products)
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